Romanzoffia californica

Mist Maidens are an integral part of spring in western Oregon. These delicate looking beauties are actually iron tough. Clouds of white flowers sway above rubbery scalloped foliage beginning in early March and continuing to early June. They have the light fragrance of vanilla. Hot weather shuts them down and they quickly retreat to their bulbous roots to wait out summer in dormancy. Once established they require little interevention from humans. Let them romp around in the spring border with such similar perennials as Primula sieboldii and Viola corsica. Just don’t forget that they are there when they magically disappear.  To 10″ tall and about as wide. In favored circumstances this Oregon native will happily self sow. Pretty and fresh as spring. Found locally in the coast range in Washington and Yamhill county. Once much more widespread. Its common name is derived from its predilection for growing at the edge of seasonal water falls.  Pretty leaves, pretty flowers, easy to please.  Oregon native plant.

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Romneya coulteri ‘Butterfly’

Improved version of the Matilija Poppy that we love to let colonize our dry hillsides. Enormous 8″ wide ruffled pure white flower petals surround a furry central yellow zone. This cultivar has bigger flowers, more of them and bluer foliage. Unfortunately, it is no less vigorous and will take all the real estate you can give it. Thats easily 10′ x 35′ in 5 years. Best in contained areas. Full sun and average, well drained soil. To 8′ tall in bloom. Transplant very carefully, do not disturb the roots- rather dig a hole and gently set the whole undisturbed rootball in there. Water regularly for the first season to establish then none in subsequent years. Stems will usually freeze to the ground in winter. Removes these in February before new growth starts. Strongly deer resistant. Native to S.California.

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Romneya coulteri seedlings

These are seed grown Matilija Poppies. They are very vigorous and will produce 5″ wide pure white flowers with a yellow center from June to September. Soft blue-gray foliage rises on 7′ stems which support the flowers. Full sun and very well drained soil and room to roam. Can travel many tens of feet in unobstructed space. Dies to the ground in winter. Cut back dead stems in spring when new growth emerges. Fried Egg Flower from Southern California. Moderate deer resistance. Wild areas, hillsides, the back 40. Spectacular in bloom.

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Rosa nutkana ‘Xera Pink’

Silently living its beautiful life in a seasonally flooded ditch near our wholesale nursery we spotted this deep pink flowering variant of our locally native Nootka rose.  Intensely fragrant deep pink single flowers appear from May-July. followed by brilliant red hips that ripen in fall. The first and second year canes carry a heavy mahogany tone that is as conspicuous as the deep pink showy flowers. An incredibly tough and adaptable native rose that can endure both seasonally flooded locations and desiccating summer drought. Even the foliage has a sweet fragrance. Carefree shrub that spreads to form colonies and rises to about 4′ tall on average. Laughs at the heaviest, driest clay soils. Red/orange fall color. Not a shrub for shy neighbors, this rose will win. Give it ample room and plan ahead.  Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Western Thimble berry is a widespread relative of raspberries that grows in many biomes and is especially abundant west of the Cascades. The 5 petal pure white  flowers that arrive in spring are among the largest of any Rubus. Thimble berry also does not have thorns. YAY.  It forms imposing patches spreading by a creeping rhizome. The large maple shaped leaves can be up to 10 cm wide To 4′ tall and spreading – give it room and plan ahead. The sweet edible red berries appear in mid-late summer. They may be detached from a core on the end of the stem. It leaves a concave hollow berry- shaped like a thimble. Its fairly high in water content which means it does not ship well and its not big as a commercial crop. Nice looking large, opulent shrub for wild areas. Water to establish then none necessary in subsequent years. Thimble berry has a very long lifespan but it is also a seral species populating disturbed sites from fire, logging, roadsides. Full sun to quite a bit of shade with good air circulation- prone to powdery mildew in wet springs. It seldom causes permanent damage to the plant. Fall color is yellow to russet and lingers. Not bothered by deer  but birds will predate the fruit and then poop out a whole new colony. Wild areas, margins of forests.

Oregon native plant

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Rubus spectabilis ‘Golden Ruby’

This golden leaved form of our native Salmon Berry is an exciting variation for wild areas. The brilliantly colored foliage sparkles with deep pink flowers in spring. In summer it produces salmon colored sweet, edible berries. To 7′ tall and spreading as wide as it would like. Full sun (with irrigation) to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Give this colonizing plant room to spread. It appreciates moist soil but is very tough when established. Deciduous- though it is a short period and the brilliant new leaves begin emerging in late winter.  Stream banks,  the back area of woodlands, wild areas. Moderate deer resistance. Increases by suckering stolons. Easy native to brighten wild woods. Oregon native plant.

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This short lived, very showy perennial is tough as nails. This strain enchants with huge flowers that are almost always single but come in tones from black to yellow, brown, orange, and red.. They immediately remind me of a blanket made by native Americans.  To 28″ tall ( compact ) with enormous flowers up to 5″ across. They come in a profusion from mid summer to early autumn. This strain has a natural life span of 3-5 years – but it does re-sow itself in open and opportune places. Open  soil that has been slightly enriched with compost / fertilizer. Full sun and regular water until fall rains take over. Mix with other sunset orange/ brown toned flowers. I pick the searing true red of Salvia ‘Royal Bumble’ as sell as the soft green spikes of Kniphofia pumila both will bloom simultaneously  with the Rudbeckia Excellent in summer containers and beloved for its long bloom time. Remove spent flowers for the first few rounds to encourage more bloom. leave the last round  to be pollinated and set seed. Excellent pollinator perennial. Regular water for the first season , less the following year. Some deer resistance.

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Rudbeckia occidentale

Our native coneflower found in the Cascades. Look! It forgot the petals. Yup thats our boy. Clump forming tall perennial for moist sunny sites. Rich, soil with ample humus. Easy to grow in a perennial border where you can take advantage of the austere look of the flowers, when they come en masse at the end of 30″ stems they are something to behold. Very good cut flower and it goes with a very modern aesthetic. Full sun. Completely deciduous in winter. Oregon Native Plant.

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Salvia microphylla ‘Flower Child’

This species has yielded some very good cold and wet tolerant cultivars. This selection from Monterey Bay Nursery in Watsonville, CA has proved to be one of the best performers. Masses of outward facing candy pink flowers swarm the stems of this large, semi-woody Salvia. The flowers begin in May and continue unabated to frost. This is a very good hue of pink, very mixeable with other colors without clashing. To 2′ tall x 2′ wide in a single season. Well drained soil of rich to average fertility. Double dig the soil before planting to incorporate oxygen and improve drainage as well as water permeability. It excels on slopes in full all day sun with just light summer water. Flowers continue through the hottest weather- good trait in our climate where many others take a break in in the mid to upper 90’s. Drought adapted when established. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring- then it can be taken back by 2/3rd. New growth will erupt from semi-woody stems around the base and you are up and running. Herbaceous below about 15ºF. Returns from the base if established. Hummers, butterflies, chicks without bras dancing around like nymphs. Its got it all. Moderate deer resistance.

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Salvia muelleri

This purple flowered royal sage has impressed us for years with its hardiness to cold, true purple flowers and tolerance of cold winter wet. A loose spreading perennial that adorns its tips with royal purple flower from June to frost. Never dense it prefers full hot sun and very well drained soils and light but consistent summer water. To 18″ tall by 2′ wide in time. Do not cut back until new growth pushes in spring. It needs a woody framework of branches to protect the overwintering crown. Takes blasting hot conditions. Moderate deer resistance. Very long blooming perennial that doesn’t flinch at heat and drought. The royal purple flowers are held in black calyxes. Excellent on slopes. Some wonderful companions are Epilobium (Zauschneria) septentrionalis ‘Select Mattole’ and Cuphea cyanea ‘hirtella’. Long lived perennial.

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