Hosta ‘Blue Mouse Ears’

Adorable blue leaved dwarf Hosta that we adore for brightening up shady corners and small spots. The thick leaves are slightly corrugated. In july 1′ stems support fragrant tubular light lavender flowers. To 8″ tall and forming an increasing clump to 1′ wide. Excellent in containers or rock gardens. Part shade to high overhead shade. The blue Hosta really do need protection from the sun. Protect emerging plants in April from slugs/snails. Rich soil with regular summer water. Extremely long lived perennial. A great dwarf Hiosta with real substance. Protect from deer and rabbits. Completely winter deciduous- disappears in September. Mix with white wood rush (Luzula nivea) and  Carex tumulicola ‘Willamette Gold’.

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A really wonderful dwarf Lily that doesn’t have you pulling down pollen covered flowers to get a smell. This lily tops out at about 14″ tall so, you’ll be bending down or even better, in a container where you can observe the intricate coloration and sweet perfume. Very thin leaves are like strings and give the small trunk a fine texture. In June/July relatively huge maroon buds open to reveal an extremely fragrant flower with an ivory interior- each individual blossom is 4″ long- very large for the overall size of the plant. Blooms continuously for 3-4 weeks. Full sun and regular water. Not bothered by lily diseases and very easy to grow. This hardy perennial increases by multiplying bulbs as well as bulbils and seed. The fragrance is not closely like most oriental lilies. Instead its a mild perfume that lingers. Plant with other smaller scale perennials. Diascia ‘Blue Bonnet’, Dianthus ‘Dainty Dame’. In time a clump will sport 3-5 flower spikes.

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One of the boldest species of lily turf that is as tough and adaptable as the rest of the genus. Wide leaves (for this genus) measure about 1″ wide and form rosettes that are staunchly evergreen. The initial rosette measures about 1′ across, in time it increases by stolons as well as enlarging clumps. This species is native to SW Asia and is surprisingly cold hardy.  Great year round appearance of foliage. In late summer 2′  thin spikes  rise above the leaves and displays soft mauve flowers for several weeks. An added vertical element that is subtle but very pretty. Part shade to shade, avoid hot dry sites. Rich soil and regular irrigation speeds growth and establishment. Adaptable to dry shade when established. Great in year round containers- I have yet to see it blemished by winter weather. Easy to grow, long lived perennial that is pretty and useful. Not bothered by deer- unsure about rabbits but I suspect they would love it. This Liriope has the widest leaves. Clumping. Consistent summer irrigation for the best appearance. Pronounced Leer-EYE- oh-pee.

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white flowers of Tritelia hyacinthina

Triteleia hyacinthina

Fool’s Onion, though this close relative of Brodiaea is easy to tell apart from Allium as the leaves and stem have no onion odor. A sunny native perennial bulb that forms colonies of white in May-July in meadows, glens, and swales. To 15″ tall in bloom but usually shorter the leaves emerge in mid winter and persist until summer drought. About that time the flowers erupt into clusters of white flowers. Great native bulb for naturalizing, Water if planting from a pot, otherwise it requires only what falls from the sky with a distinct dry period in summer. Associated  plants are Ranunculus occidentalis- Western Buttercup, and Brodiaea elegans- Cluster lily, and Plectritis congesta- Sea Blush.  Native in clay soils that dry completely in summer. Goes very  neatly dormant in summer- nothing is left. Excellent in rock garden conditions. Full sun to very light shade. Moderate deer resistance. Native though out western Oregon. Sweet cutflower Very good for butterflies as well. This plant once occupied large areas of the Willamette Valley, that territory has shrunk considerably.  Oregon native plant.

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