Clarkia amoena 'Dwarf Pink'

Clarkia amoena ‘Dwarf Pink’

Farewell-to-spring is a common wildflower of meadows and glens in Western Oregon. It gets its name because it is often the last wildflower to bloom before the summer drought ends the show. This form differs by its pure pink profuse flowers on a dwarf plant. (The wild form is lavender with a red blotch in the center of each petal.). An amazing display of bloom that appears as if someone dropped a bouquet on the ground. You see no evidence of leaves when its in full fettle. Blooms June to October in a garden setting with regular summer water and rich soil and the gardeners diligence removing spent flowers. Reseeds in open disturbed soil.  to 10″ tall and a little wider forming a dome. Nice cut flower. Fun variation on a native. Very attractive to native pollinators. True hardy annual. Oregon native plant.

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Clarkia amoena 'Dwarf White'

Clarkia amoena ‘Dwarf White’

Excellent little selection of our locally native wildflower ‘Farewell to Spring’. To just 10″ tall this plant(s) become a solid dome of white flowers from May-August. Cute little cut flower. Full sun in rich, to average well drained soil with just light competition from other plants. Re-seeds reliably in open disturbed sites. A great native derivative for hell strips and even containers. Regular summer water – or it will shut down go dormant and think its time to set seed and then make its melon. Rough areas, cut flower. Oregon native plant.

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Clarkia amoena ssp. lindleyi

Clarkia amoena ssp. lindleyi

Farewell to Spring is so called because it is one of the last conspicuous native wildflowers to bloom before the onset of summer drought. And bloom it does  all the way to late August. Its seen in mass populations waving above the already cere grass on hillsides that dot the valley. Little water is needed but a little supplemental water and removing spent flowers will extend the show.  Otherwise it will die upon setting seed. The 2′ tall stems support multiple luminous pink cup shaped flowers. They appear superficially like a poppy. This is the variety that is locally native in the Portland area. The distinctly lavender pink flowers fade to a lighter interior near the center. But it will also appear with a darker pink/red blotch in the center of each petal on a minority of seedlings.  These assist in guiding pollinators and this plant is a prime source for all native bees and butterflies. Excellent cut flower that lasts for quite a while in a vase. This is the source species of all the fancy cultivars that are raised in the cut flower trade. Reseeds happily in open disturbed sites. Excellent plant for wild areas and is often employed on road cuts and freeway embankments in deliberately sown wild flower mixtures. I’ve noticed that this local subspecies re-sows itself annually where other subspecies and especially the showy florist varieties are shy to do so. If you want a robust, climate adapted wildflower then go with this subspecies. It comes back strong. Probably our showiest and longest blooming native annual.  Reseeds- leave stems to dry and disperse seed and remember to leave open spaces for next years show. Wonderful with yellow Madia elegans for a months long display of brilliant native annuals. A Xera favorite plant. See video below (IMG) taken at the William Finley Wildlife Refuge just south of Corvallis.  Oregon native plant.

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Cuphea cyanea var. subhirtella

Cuphea cyanea var. subhirtella

This plant has been a real surprise. Most Cupheas are decidedly tender to cold in our climate, however, this variety soars above the rest. Its been a long term reliable perennial for us. Perhaps just a smidge hardier than the species. This charming little bat flower delights with multicolor flowers- tubular and shades of pink and yellow. The petals that serve as the bats ears are maroon. Wonderful long blooming plant- flowers continuously all summer to autumn. To 1′ tall and as wide. As a perennial it excels in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water in full sun. Just when you think it won’t return in spring it quickly arrives with warm weather and commences blooming almost straight away. Loved by hummingbirds, butterflies and pollinators in general. Treat it well – water and establish and mulch for the first winter. As an annual it is wonderful as a continuous flowering container subject. Native to Mexico.

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Cuphea cyanea 'Strybing Sunset'

Cuphea cyanea ‘Strybing Sunset’

We originally grew this wonderful vivid free blooming bat flower as an annual. But after years of growing it in the ground we’ve found that its remarkably root hardy. To 20″ tall forming a semi-woody shrublet it produces sprays of small but vivid flowers from May to frost. Full sun and rich, WELL DRAINED soil in the ground and patience- it takes a while to come back in spring- usually not until truly hot days appear in  May. Once up- with regular supplemental water it zooms and blooms and resumes its previous stature quickly. Good drainage in a hot position seems to be the key as a perennial. Mine has happily lived in the ground in my garden in North Portland for 7 years- returning from the coldest winters. It will freeze to the ground below about 28ºF- but it always returns. Great seasonal plant in containers and it will draw hummingbirds from 5 counties around. Nice plant. Blooms continuously without intervention. My kind of plant.

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Cuphea micropetala

Cuphea micropetala

Groovy Cuphea that we grow as an annual. In mild winters and with good drainage this rainbow of a plant may over winter. Either way its a long, long blooming plant from June to frost. Spikes appear continuously holding tubular shaped flowers- they begin yellow and age to orange for a multicolor effect that yields a dramatic show. To 10″ x 1′ forming an expanding clump. Full sun and rich well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Best on the edge of a container where the spikes which protrude nearly horizontally will showcase the flowers. Loved by hummingbirds, bumble bees and just about any pollinator. Remove spent flower spikes to encourage more. Very easy to grow. Mexico.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria ) 'Solidarity Pink'

Epilobium (Zauschneria ) ‘Solidarity Pink’

If shocking vermillion, red, and orange are a bit too vibrant for you enter this softly hued selection. Soft pink tubular flowers appear constantly from early August to October. Low spreading perennial to 8″ tall by 2′ wide in a short time. The very light green foliage is clad in soft hairs giving the whole plant a soft mien. Full sun and rich to average well drained soil is ideal. Slopes, rock gardens, walls, hellstrips all are appropriate for this low water plant. Water diligently to establish but never boggy. In subsequent years only light water on occasion is required. Spreads laterally underground by stolons. Long lived perennial if sited and somewhat cared for. Completely winter deciduous- cut away the previous years dead growth in February. Somewhat deer resistant. Mix with other late blooming perennial. Wonderful combined with Cuphea hirtella and the soft yellow flowers of Erodium chrysanthemum.  West coast native plant that calls to hummingbirds far and wide. Takes blasting hot conditions in stride.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) ‘Bowman’

Possibly our second most popular California Fuchsia cultivar as it is more upright but also a free and early bloomer. To 20″ tall the fine green leaves that line the stems make the brilliant orange tubular flowers stand out. Blooms early August to October and spreading underground by stolons to form expanding colonies. To several feet wide- give it room. Ideal in full sun, well drained soil- or on a slope which will further assist in drainage. Brilliant flowers are a beacon to Hummingbirds. Completely drought adapted and requires little if any summer water. Long blooming western native perennial.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) 'Sierra Salmon'

Epilobium (Zauschneria) ‘Sierra Salmon’

Cool late blooming California Fuchsia with silver foliage a great foil for the soft coral and prolific September/October flowers. Spreading to 2′ wide and 1′ tall in bloom it prefers very well drained rich soil with little summer water. Full sun including hot aspects for the best results. Winter deciduous. A great flower color for the genus and pairs sweetly with autumn Salvias, such as ‘Playa Rosa’ and ‘Flower Child’. Drought adapted and cold hardy.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) 'Silver Select'

Epilobium (Zauschneria) ‘Silver Select’

No other California Fuchsia has foliage that even approaches being as ashy white as this cultivar. Its as if the foliage is covered in dense white powder. The 1″ long hot orange/red flowers absolutely shine against this ghostly backdrop. Vigorous perennial for well drained sites and just light summer water. Full sun. To 20″ tall in bloom which starts in early August and continues into October. Hummingbirds dive down for this vivid sweet treat. Expanding to a clump 2′ wide in just a few years. Dies completely away in winter…only the stoloniferous roots remain to regenerate this sexy perennial in spring. Moderate deer resistance.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) cana 'Woody's Peach Surprise'

A beautiful color form of California Fuchsia with kind of a creepy name. No idea who named it. But this is a very long blooming, low, spreading perennial with downy gray green foliage and a constant procession of tubular peach/pink flowers. Loved by low flying hummer’s this plant is ideal for hot, locations in soil that never becomes boggy. To 6″ tall x 2′ wide and forming substantial patches in full sun. Excellent performance in hell strips. Most Epilobiums (Zauschneria) in our climate are drought tolerant but they perform better and are showier in bloom with light, occasional summer water.  Water during the driest times of the year about once every two weeks. Blooms begin in late July and are resplendent well into autumn.  Great long term performance in large containers, planters. Winter deciduous. Remove frost damaged tops when frost kills them. Best to match the vigor of this perennial with vigorous neighbors. It can swamp shy plants. Excellent in rock walls, at the top of walls.  Combine with Sedum palmeri, Helichrysum thianshanicum, Chocolate cosmos for a community of perennials with identical requirements. Winter deciduous. Spreads laterally by underground stolons. Give Woody some room.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) latifolia 'Calistoga'

Epilobium (Zauschneria) latifolia ‘Calistoga’

California Fuchsias are known for their striking hot orange flowers. This variety takes it even  further with profuse flowers that range to vermillion red. To 1′ tall and 3′ wide in rich, well drained soil with little summer moisture. Full sun. This spreading gray leaved perennial begins blooming in August and extends to October. Excellent perennial for dry hillsides, large rock gardens. Combines well with Arctostaphylos and other low water plants. Loved by hummingbirds. Completely deciduous in winter. Give it room to spread.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) septentrionalis 'Select Mattole'

Epilobium (Zauschneria) septentrionalis ‘Select Mattole’

Our most popular hummingbird fuchsia because of its low habit, dense silvery foliage and early and extended bloom period. To just 6″ tall and spreading to form a patch 2′ wide quickly. Well drained rich soil with little summer irrigation once established. Hot vermillion orange tubular flowers are born continuously and en masse from July to October. Completely drought adapted when established. Great on slopes. Light summer water to establish. Winter deciduous. Loved by Hummingbirds. This species is native to the northern California and SW Oregon redwood region.

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Fuchsia 'Alison Patricia'

Fuchsia ‘Alison Patricia’

We adore this incredibly floriferous and compact Fuchsia with masses of flowers that point out and up. The sepals are coral pink with a corolla approaching light violet. This little 2′ x 2′ subshrub begins blooming straight away in June and continues like a powerhouse until frost. Almost always freezes to the ground but recovers its full stature by summer. Best in full sun or even better an open north exposure or easterly aspect with protection from late afternoon heat/sun. Very showy little plant that is a ball of color. Fits well in the borders or containers. Hardy Fuchsias are easily tucked into partly shady corners, though this plant is happier with more sun. Loved by hummingbirds and gardeners a like. Fun to grow Fuchsia that puts out in a big way. Amend the soil to enrich and plant slightly deep for added winter protection. Mulch in fall if you are in a colder garden. Excellent performance in full sun at the Oregon coast.

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Fuchsia 'Campopple'

Fuchsia ‘Campopple’

We love ultra hardy Fuchsias, they are so carefree and they bloom and bloom. We found this Fuchsia in a garden near our shop. It was identified by our friend Annie Hayes at Annie’s annuals. Large growing subshrub to 5′ x 6′ in time. Red sepals surround a deep purple corolla with each petal marked with a strip of hot pink. Lovely. Flowers are large for a hardy Fuchsia and are profuse from June to frost. Fuchsia mite resistant. Very easy to grow in light shade to full sun. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water is ideal. Very established plants can make due with less. Freezes to the ground in the low 20’s- but not every year. Wait until new growth emerges then remove the frozen material. Loved by hummingbirds as well as gardeners. Lustrous  deep green foliage outlines the pendant flowers. You’ll never lose this long lived plant to winter. Good to try where rabbits are a problem.

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Fuchsia 'Dancing Stars'

Fuchsia ‘Dancing Stars’

Adorable Fuchsia that is a prolific bloomer. Widely spreading diagonal stems support curtains of pendant small flowers. The sepals and floral tube are white and the corolla is violet purple. Each flower provides its own contrast but in masses they are beautiful. To 2′ x 3′ in a single season in rich, moisture retentive soil with good drainage. Regular summer water. Apply a handful of all organic fertilizer in mid-spring. Dies to the ground in the first hard freeze, resprouts from the base in mid-spring. Great container Fuchsia. Apply a thick mulch of compost for the first autumn and plant deeply for added winter protection.

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Fuchsia 'Dying Embers'

Fuchsia ‘Dying Embers’

Striking hardy Fuchsia with stunning deeply hued flowers. Sepals are deep wine colored and a corolla of nearly black fading a bit upon opening to deep maroon. Very floriferous Fuchsia with masses of small flowers over a bushy upright growing sub-shrub. To 3′ x 3′ in rich, well drained soil in part shade. Regular summer water and give it a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring. Dies to the ground in very hard freezes and resprouts vigorously in mid-spring. Wonderful plant for borders, the edge of woodlands and even containers. Glossy foliage is very handsome too. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring- then you’ll know what is dead and what to remove. Very hardy variety.

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Fuchsia 'Galfrey Lye'

Fuchsia ‘Galfrey Lye’

Flowers! Flowers! Flowers! This extraordinary hardy garden Fuchsia produces masses upon masses of long tubular flowers. The floral tube and sepals are white and corolla is deep rose with distinct orange tints. To 2.5′ tall and as wide in a single season. Heavy bloom begins almost immediately and continues unabated to frost. Excellent container Fuchsia and in the garden give it rich soil that is moisture retentive but drains. Incorporate plenty of compost into the soil and add a handful of all organic fertilizer at planting. Mulch the first winter and plant deeply to protect the crown. Once established it is reliably hardy. Freezes to the ground below 26ºF. Returns in mid-spring from the base and almost immediately starts blooming. Regular summer water. Full sun to part shade. (Avoid the reflected heat of a wall). Excellent performance on open north exposures where there is bright light but protection from intense heat/sun.

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Fuchsia 'Insulinde'

Fuchsia ‘Insulinde’

Not the hardiest Fuchsia but by all means one of the showiest. This improved form of ‘Gartenmeister’ is taller  with longer brilliant orange red flowers. Tubular pendant flowers in groups to 3″ long. They appear in a massive and continuous display for months petering out around frost. To 30″ tall and very upright- just half as wide. The foliage is a distinct maroon/burgundy which sets off the hot colored flowers nicely. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Part shade to full sun (but not against a hot wall) with water. Incorporate a handful of all organic fertilizer at planting. To over winter this more tender than normal beauty plant deeply, mulch in autumn heavily, and even pile some dry leaves around the crown. It may return from the base if we have a mild winter (above 20ºF). Otherwise its a stellar container constituent. Hummingbirds.

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Fuchsia 'Jim Muncaster'

Fuchsia ‘Jim Muncaster’

A truly cold hardy Fuchsia with excellent attributes. Wine red stems reveal single flowers with a raspberry red petals that surround an opulently deep aubergine purple corolla. Upright sub-shrub to 2′ x 2′ or larger following a mild winter. Perfectly hardy to cold down to 0ºF. Elegant, profuse blooming care free fuchsia for part shade and rich, moisture retentive well drained soil with regular summer water. Emerges quickly in spring growth surpassing damaged wood quickly and often in bloom by early June. Blooms non-stop until frost. Completely reliable garden Fuchsia.

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Fuchsia ‘Preston Guild’

Excellent hardy Fuchsia with very pretty flowers. The sepals are white with a bit of green on the tips. The corolla emerges purple/blue and fades slightly to violet. Upon opening the sepals slowly open and then gracefully recurve over the top of the flower. It reminds me of origami. Very upright growing plant to 2.5′ tall and just 18″ wide in a season. Constant bloomer from June to frost and beyond. Freezes to the ground below 26ºF and returns vigorously from the base in spring. Plant deeply for extra winter protection for the first season. Mulch with compost in autumn. Add a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring. Regular summer water in full sun to part shade to quite a bit of shade. Easy garden Fuchsia with lovely flowers. Hummingbirds, bumblebees, be-sotted gardeners, big containers.

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Fuchsia ‘Ravenslaw’

Cool name for a cool garden Fuchsia. To 2′ x 3′ in a single season. The large, single flowers are “selfed”. That is both the sepals and corolla are the same color of soft red. Very profuse blooming and the large flowers have exceptional grace. Cold hardy, easy to grow Fuchsia that is also remarkably heat tolerant. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, moisture retentive soil that drains. Regular summer water speeds growth and enhances bloom. Plant deeply for added winter protection in the first season and mulch with compost the first autumn. Add a handful of all purpose organic fertilizer in spring- Fuchsias dearly love fertilizer. Freezes to the ground below 26ºF, resprouts vigorously from the base in spring. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring. Very cold hardy. Full sun only with regular summer water. Avoid reflected heat.

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Fuchsia ‘Suikkerbosse’

We took a break from Fuchsias for a few years, but its time to bring back some of the best. This compact, dense growing Fuchsia is a blooming workhorse. Sepals emerge green then take on terra cotta tints while the downward facing corolla is made of intense velvet plum petals. Cold hardy and it returns as a robust clump. To 2′ x 2′ forming a rounded outline. Excellent performance in full sun to part shade.  It becomes a little less compact in shade. This Dutch selection has survived all of the 16 years that we’ve grown it. An open north exposure is the best- open to the sky but no direct heat. Very good in containers. Rich soil and regular summer water. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring. Then remove frost damaged material. Wonderful Dutch selection. Beautiful plant.

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Fuchsia ‘Thomasina’

One of our favorite garden Fuchsias for its unique flower color and prolific blooming habit. Sepals are terra cotta orange with green tips and the corolla is rich auburn red. Very nice. To 14″ x 2′ in a single season. Excellent container Fuchsia where you can match the cool flower colors for a great effect. Part shade to high overhead shade in a cool position. Rich, moisture retentive soil with mulch in fall. Dies to the ground with the first hard freeze and returns quickly from the roots in spring. Plant deeply to ensure greater winter protection for the first season. Fuchsias adore fertilizer- give ‘Thomasina’ a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring. They also respond heartily to liquid fish emulsion. Blooms June to frost.

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Fuchsia ‘Whiteknight’s Pearl’

Big, huge hardy Fuchsia with much larger and more conspicuous flowers than the similar F. m. ‘Molinae’. To 4′ x 4′ in a season. Continuously blooms from June to frost in rich soil with REGULAR irrigation. This is a thirsty Fuchsia and pairs wonderfully with other thirsty plants as Hydrangeas and Weigela. Large flowers have a sepal and corolla of the same chalk pink. The wood is hardy to about 24ºF and it will freeze to the ground below that. Vigorous regrowth in spring shoots up from the semi-woody framework. Very hardy and recommended for the coldest gardens. Excellent performance on the Oregon coast. Purportedly has some resistance to rabbits but I would not bank on that. Makes a great hedge in full sun to part shade. Excellent on an eastern exposure with afternoon shade. Amend the soil well to enrich for the most vigorous establishment. Excellent in concert with all white flowered Fuchsia ‘Hawkshead’. Hardy in containers. A large plant in full bloom is spectacular.

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Fuchsia ‘Zulu Prince’

Wonderful, large spreading hardy Fuchsia that falls in the aubergine clan. That means that at some point in its past the genes involved the deep purple black flowered Fuchsia excorticata. This lax growing plant sends curtains of slim flowers with a corolla of deep aubergine purple and sepals of merlot red. Established plants are about 30″ tall by 3′ wide for rich soil in light shade and regular summer moisture. This Fuchsia LOVES rich soil to perform at its peak. In full blooms its fairly spectacular. Blooms from June to frost. The pewter glinted leaves have deep wine red petioles. The whole plant is a good package. Freezes to the ground below about 25ºF. Mulch for the first winter and do not remove frost damaged growth until you see new growth emerge in spring. You’ll easily identify the material that has to go. Loved by hummingbirds. This cultivar lends itself to planting at the top of a shady wall where you can more easily view the curtains of rich flowers.

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Fuchsia hatchbachii

Regal, rambunctious and totally hardy climbing Fuchsia species with handsome long glossy green leaves and masses of small glossy red and purple tilted flowers on long stems. To 8′ tall in a single season it is one of the cold hardiest of the genus and wood is seldom frozen back all the way to the ground. its hardiness ensure early growth and subsequent bloom. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, well drained soil with light, consistent summer irrigation. Though it will subsist on less. Long lived large plant that can increase by suckering as well as top growth. The vivid glossy flowers are tilted outwards beckoning nectar seeking animals. Wood is hardy to 15ºF- the hardiest of any Fuchsia that we grow. Give it room and support. May be grown as a free standing shrub.

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Fuchsia magellanica ‘Aurea’

Striking and useful ultra hardy Fuchsia with brilliant lime/gold leaves and curtains of simple elongated red and purple flowers. This is a very tough sub-shrub and even tolerates quite dry conditions when established.  To 3′  x 3′ forming a semi woody arching clump. Woody top growth is hardy to about 22ºF and below that this Fuchsia will likely freeze to the ground. In mid-spring an eruption of new growth arrives at the base and if winter was not too harsh woody stems may re-leaf. Best in part shade or morning sun and afternoon shade. Rich soil with regular summer irrigation. Completely hardy and very long lived. Glows in the landscape and the lipstick red flowers are very conspicuous. Blooms late June to frost. Loved by hummingbirds. Excellent even rambunctious performance at the Oregon coast. Wait to cut back frozen/dead growth until you see new growth in spring. This will tell you how much you need to remove. Establishes very quickly. Easy and hardy.

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Fuchsia magellanica ‘Hawkshead’

Fuchsias don’t have to be over the top with huge double flowers the size of wadded up tissue. Nope. This is one of the very best and it makes due with profuse all white flowers- the tips of the sepals are dipped in green. Vigorous hardy Fuchsia that reaches 4′ x 4′ in a single season in rich, well drained soil with consistent summer moisture. Full sun (but with regular water and no reflected heat) to part shade. Masses of pendulous flowers appear from June to October. Loved by hummingbirds. This light airy sub-shrub combines perfectly in lush borders or as a single stunning specimen. Dies to the ground below 20ºF- re-sprouts from the base vigorously in spring. Easy, hardy, beautiful.

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Gaura (Oenothera) lindheimeri

So so many new cultivars of this easy to grow free flowering perennial. And you know what? Some of them don’t even bloom that well and the color pink….a little nauseating. WE love the straight species and grow it from seed each year. Spreading rambunctious perennial with 3′ wands of five petalled white flowers. Full sun and virtually any soil- it can get really wild in rich soil, beware. Native to sand dunes on the barrier islands in Alabama/gulf coast but it loves it here. Begins blooming for us in late May and goes non-stop for months. If it gets tired or ratty simply cut the mother all the way to the ground, water it and wah lah there you go. Light summer water. Pollinator friendly perennial that has great drought adaptation when established. To 3′ wide.

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Oenothera fremontii

Excellent Rocky Mountain native that we love for its long long season of bloom. Large luminous light yellow flowers held against silvery fine foliage. Completely deciduous in winter it sprouts anew each spring to form a fairly compact spreading clump. In June and continuously for two months a parade of large flowers obscures the leaves. To just 10″ tall but spreading to about 1/1/2′ wide annually. Full sun, very well drained soil and little summer water when established. Give it an open exposure with little crowding from other plants. Impervious to the most enervating dry heat. Hellstrips, rock gardens, hillsides. Moderate deer resistance. Seed grown.

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Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn4a -25º to -30ºF
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Oenothera incana var. macrocarpa

Excellent form of this sprawling Rocky Mountain native evening primrose. Super silver leaves are held upright on a spreading plant.  Beginning in June huge 3″ wide shimmering, luminous light yellow fragrant flowers appear almost daily for months. Full sun and rich, well drained soil with little summer water once established. Excellent performance in rock gardens as well as parking strips. The flowers are a really good shade of yellow and harmonize brilliantly with the silver foliage. Winter deciduous.

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Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn4a -25º to -30ºF
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