Banksia marginata 'Nana'

Banksia marginata ‘Nana’

MINIMARGE! This is a dwarf form of Banksia marginata that has been cold hardy in the Portland area. The key to cold hardiness is to establish the plant well. Unlike other members of the Proteaceae this small shrub likes the soil a bit richer, but that drains well. You can even add a small amount of compost when planting but nothing other than that. Water it until you see good new growth then taper off to once every two weeks. Full sun, in a warm, protected location. A south facing slope with protection from east wind is ideal. To 3′ x 3′ in 7 years. On older wood 4″ tall yellow cones are produced as flowers from spring to autumn. Protect young plants from severe cold. Very good performance on the Oregon coast. In time it will form a small lignotuber. A swollen woody base with dormant buds. It may then be cut back fairly hard and re-growth will commence. Avoid crowding this plant with others. Open and happy is how it likes to be. Great plant for a large rock garden. Hummingbirds adore the spectacular long lasting flowers. Foliage is deep green with an underside of silver and forms winding stems- never tidy. A plant for collectors primarily. This is not a plant for beginners. Heh. Avoid all fertilizers. Limited supply.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Embothrium coccineum

Embothrium coccineum

Chilean Fire tree is a  brilliant and fun tree to grow in the milder parts of the PNW. Our seed strain is from established cold hardy specimens around Portland.  Moderately fast growing somewhat thin tree to 18′ tall and just 6′ wide in 10 years. In late spring (May) the tree is smothered in fascinating tubular hot orange/red flowers that are effective for a month or more. Semi-deciduous to deciduous in these hardy forms. Full sun and average well drained soil that has NOT been amended. Protea family it is sensitive to high nutrients- best in our native unimproved conditions. Light summer water. Hummingbirds manna. Long grown in the PNW- because it adores our maritime climate. Fantastic performance at the Oregon coast. Less susceptible to overly enriched soil. Mulch after planting. Fall color is very late Nov/Dec and is red glowing orange. Very important to water this tree until you see progressive new growth. It can be somewhat difficult to establish. Avoid disturbing the roots and mulch lightly with bark. In subsequent years water once every 2 weeks in summer is sufficient. Blooms on wood from the previous year. Prune AFTER flowering if needed. Full sun, from every direction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea australis

Alpine Grevillea is a cold hardy, handsome, adaptable evergreen shrub that is good looking at all times. In late winter/early spring flossy white flowers explode over the bush and emit an intense honey fragrance. Each small leaf is olive/ochre green on the surface and silver below. Dense, fine textured very rounded compact shrub to 4′ tall and 5′ wide in 5 years. Maxes out at that height but continues to gain width. Avoid enriched, over-improved soil. Best in unimproved native or even poor soils with sharp drainage. Little water ever once established. Cold hardiest Grevillea taking temperatures to just near 0ºF with no problem. Tolerates subfreezing wind as well as ice and snow. Easy to grow if left strictly alone. It may be pruned in spring to limit the size- prune tips.  Very good landscaping plant. The powerful honey fragrance of the flowers is detectable for quite a distance on warm days. But for this it would make a good cut flower- fragrance is a little too strong. Cut branches last for several weeks in a vase and foliage is handsome. Takes very well to pruning. Good deer resistance. Video below is of a plant in full bloom. Takes a moment for the video to load.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea australis var. prostrate

Interesting plant for the collector. This is a low and mounding form of the hardiest Grevillea species. The tiny leaves are pointed, not rolled as in the species and they have a uniform tan green hue. In spring- after several years in the ground tiny flossy white flowers swarm the foliage from every leaf axil. They emit a penetrating honey perfume for weeks. VERY VERY slow growing to just 8″ tall and barely 2′ wide after 7 years. Full sun- no shade at all and average to poor well drained soil. It does just fine in native soil that has not been amended and its ultimate preference is for loam. Excellent small evergreen shrub for rock gardens, small spaces. More of a collectors plant. Useful on steep hillsides. Very hardy to cold enduring 5ºF with no issues. Little to no summer water. Moderate deer resistance.  Slow. Tasmania, SE Australian Alps. In the wild it cozies up to boulders to absorb radiant heat. This could be repeated easily in a garden. Rare. Limited quantities.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea juniperina ‘Firewoman’

About 15 years ago we planted this tiny seedling at the top of our propagation hill behind our wholesale nursery in Sherwood. After all those years and two trips down to 5ºF, numerous ice, snow, wind events it has remained completely happy and unblemished. This is closer to the species in form. To 4′ tall x 6′ wide in 5 years. Very prickly needles pose as the leaves forming a very formidable shrub. From January to July flaming red/orange flowers are curly and lick the tips of the stems like flames. And LOVED by hummers. Full sun to part shade, the very poorest, most well drained soil with no summer water once established. Takes clay soils on slopes. Completely drought adapted and it likes it that way. Great deer resistance. Long season of bloom on a charming architectural evergreen shrub. Excellent companion shrub for Arctostaphylos ( they both bloom in winter and attract hummers) as well as other drought adapted plants such as Italian Cypress and Arbutus. Our plant lives in what is termed ‘gravel reject’ which is the tailings from the gravel pit near by. It is 50% gravel and 50% fine soil- and is fairly challenging as far as summer drought goes. This plant has thrived. In richer soil expect faster growth. We do not give our stock plant supplemental water ever. Tough plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea juniperina ‘Lava Cascade’

Low ground cover form of the Juniper Grevillea. Spreading to 6′ wide it rises to just 2′ when happy. Most of the time it is much lower. This selection is the most commonly seen orange form of this species. Spidery orange/red flaming flowers appear in clusters at the branch tips. The most likely bloom period is February-June- but older plants pump out sporadic flowers year round. Excellent on slopes- especially warm south facing slopes in a protected location. Surprisingly cold hardy enduring temperatures down to about 8ºF with no damage. Avoid subfreezing wind as well as boggy conditions and crowding from other plants. It likes to dry out in winter, and loathes wet plants laying on it. Extremely drought adapted requiring no supplemental water after a year or two. Highly deer resistant. Excellent evergreen- but prickily shrub for Hell strips. Loved by hummingbirds. We have since introduced G. j. ‘Xera Ember’ which is a more compact shrub 2′ x 4′ and has more deeply hued (bordering on red) flowers for a longer period. Gains hardiness with age. Pictured here with ‘Molonglo’.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea juniperina ‘Molonglo’

Juniper leaved Grevillea that is a low spreading ground cover. Grass green needle like foliage plays host and is often obscured by masses of curly apricot yellow flowers. They peak in late spring but occur almost any time of year. Poor, well drained soil in full sun with no supplemental water ever. To 2′ tall by 6′ wide in 5 years. Supremely adapted to the heat and drought of parking strips. Prickly foliage deters animals- and even people. Incredibly floriferous shrub that gains cold hardiness with establishment.  Loved by hummingbirds. Protect from subfreezing wind. No fertilizer.  Dense enough growth to smother weeds Best with total neglect. Loved by hummingbirds. Little water when established. Amazing in bloom.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea juniperina 'Orange Zest'

Grevillea juniperina ‘Orange Zest’

We grew and selected this spiky long blooming juniper Grevillea years ago, After a few years hiatus we’ve brought it back. Upright then spreading evergreen shrub. Incredibly sharp needles pose as the leaves. Curly orange typical spider flowers for the species with profuse flowers. Bloom is year round on established plants but for the first several years it peaks in spring. To 3′ x 5′ in 6 years. Full sun to part shade- Increased bloom and a more compact habit will be achieved in full sun. Tolerates a wide variety of soils but seems to excel with at least moderate drainage. Adaptable to clay soils. This is one of the cold hardiest cultivars of this species enduring 5ºF with no damage. Best in an open exposure with reasonable air circulation. No crowding with other plants. Excellent in the back of a rock garden or in a shrub border with Manzanita and Halimium. Water to establish , once its growing in earnest you can taper off and drought adaptation is exceptional. Avoid enriched soils, best in average unamended soil. Double dig a wide hole to assist the plant in rooting into virgin soil. Extremely deer resistant but adored by hummingbirds and many other birds in general. Very fun shrub to grow.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea juniperina ‘Pink Lady’

A pretty shrub for a protected location.  Compact growing evergreen shrub with medium green needle-like foliage. To 2′ x 4′ in 5 years. Nearly year round-but peaking in spring, copious light pink curly flowers are loved by hummers. Protected location in virgin, un-improved soil. Drought adapted when established.  Excellent on a hot south facing slope- avoid crowding by other plants or an exposed cold site. Its possible that this is a hybrid and not pure G. juniperina. However, there is so much variability in this species that we are unsure. Extremely drought tolerant but it seems to grow faster and bloom more profusely with light water in summer. This plant is great at the Oregon coast where it is in nearly full bloom year round. It has survived undamaged in my garden for 9 years and has endured temperatures to 10ºF undamaged. It could be much hardier (when established). Limited qualities.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea juniperina ‘Xera Ember’

Our improved selection of the Juniper Leaved Grevillea with darker orange to near red profuse flowers and a more compact habit. To 2′ x  4′ wide in time the prickly grass green foliage of this spreading evergreen shrub allows the vivid curly deeply colored flowers to shine. Blooms nearly year round with a peak in mid to late spring. Loved by hummingbirds. Completely drought adapted- never needs supplemental water. Poor to average soil that drains but has never been amended or fertilized. Awesome candidate for a hot hillside or a protected hot south facing wall. Spectacular in bloom. Requests neglect- you should oblige. Hardy to around 7ºF.  Full sun.  High deer resistance.

Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea miqueliana var. moroka

Round leaf Grevillea is a great  hardy species from the highest elevations in the mountains of SE Australia. Handsome wavy round evergreen leaves frame showy pendant flower clusters from January to June. The sunset colored flowers feature orange/yellow/pink in various incarnations depending on the temperatures. Loved by over wintering Anna’s hummingbirds. Any reasonably well drained soil that has NOT been amended. Native soils are perfect, and tolerant of clay as well as sand.  Great on slopes. Fast, large growing to 8′ x 8′ in 6 years.  Sporadic flowers appear year round. Avoid fertilizers. One of the best climate adapted Grevilleas that we have grown. Grows very fast with little water. Full sun and a hot position. Listed as endangered/threatened in Australia where it occupies just a half dozen sites in the high mountains. Extra reason to grow this fabulous multidimensional shrub that is good looking year round and blooms for a long, long period. Light summer water is best as infrequent deep soaks when it is not hot. This shrub gains cold hardiness with establishment. Excellent sited where its roots can find protection and a cool respite. Large boulders, even pavers will help create this. A very rare Grevillea that is truly alpine in nature.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea rivularis

Surprisingly cold hardy and wonderful Grevillea that is threatened in the wild. Crinkly, prickily, finely divided leaves (bipinnapartite) create a haze of a frame to 5′ x 6′ in 6 years. This “cage” of foliage is intermittently decorated with soft purple flowers from spring to early autumn. These are tipped with a bright green style that is released in bloom. The flowers are often described as toothbrush like. Full sun to very light shade in average soil. Light summer water speeds growth but that is the only reason it is necessary. A protected location. Hardy to about 10ºF- and suffering no damage in the wild winter of 2016/17. Protect from subfreezing wind. Easy to grow with neglect and good siting. Same hardiness to cold as ‘Canberra Gem’. Give it room as it will steadily and methodically increase before you know it. Moderate deer resistance. AKA Carrington Falls Grevillea. Avoid fertilizers. If it never bloomed this shrub is fantastic for texture alone. Not for cold gardens- best with some urban protection. Very limited quantities.

Photo credit: Loree Bohl

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea victorae ‘Murray Valley Queen’

A vibrant form of Royal Grevillea that is slightly less hardy to cold than the species and requires a protected spot. Why grow this variety? It blooms, and blooms, and blooms. Rusty orange buds decorate pendant clusters that open to fresh orange. This plant sets tons of buds in summer and then releases them to the public through all the months of winter. Slightly smaller leaves are dusted in brown indumentum when young. To 8′ x 8′ very fast in average, unamended soil where water does not linger. Best in urban gardens with extra heat. It does not abort as many, if any flower buds in the summer drought. Excellent performance at the Oregon coast. Rounded upright and spreading evergreen shrub that remains handsome year round. Prune if needed after the last flush of flowers in spring. Winter flowers are a beacon to Anna’s Hummingbirds. Native to Australia where it was discovered near the Capital of Canberra. Nice cut flower. Water to establish then taper to once a month in summer. In colder gardens locate under the canopy of tall trees or near a warm wall. Full sun to light shade.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea victoriae ‘UBC Form’

Royal Grevillea is one of the most handsome shrubs that we can grow in our climate. Native to the highest elevation in Australia and then down to the middle elevations this species has been grown in our climate successfully for many decades. Large, long gray foliage is handsome year round and a great backdrop to the masses of orange pendulous flowers which are most prolific during winter. Loved by hummingbirds – Anna’s will stake out this shrub as one of the few sources of nectar during winter.  Full sun to light shade in average soil with light, consistent water to establish. Avoid baking hot locations as this plant forms and sets its flower buds in late spring and summer and they hold until the cool of autumn arrives to open. If this plant becomes too hot or stressed it can abort these flower buds diminishing the following seasons display. So, an average position away from reflected heat produces the best blooming. Very good performance in cold rural gardens, enduring 5ºF with no issue. Very large growing to 12′ x 12′ and sometimes larger with time. May be pruned hard in early spring to both limit the overall size but to increase density and blooming wood. Great performance at the Oregon coast and in Puget Sound as well as the coast range and Cascade foothills.  In the Willamette Valley the hybrids ‘Neil Bell’, ‘Octopinky’, ‘Poorinda Queen’ and the species G. Juniperina do not abort their flower buds in the hottest weather- and seem to perform more satisfactorily.  Moderately deer resistant.  Long lived. This form is from the University of British Columbia.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Canberra Gem’

One of the easiest Grevilleas to grow in our gardens this free flowering hybrid requires a protected location but is surprisingly hardy when well sited. To 4′ x 6′ wide in 5 years, the needle like foliage is bright green and fairly crowded along the stems. In spring through autumn- and sometimes during mild winters clusters of spidery deep vivid magenta flowers appear all over the plant. Very showy. Loved by hummers. Full sun and average to poor well drained soils. Great at the top of a hillside or next to the south wall of a house. No summer water, or compost necessary.  You may water it weekly to establish and you can trail off as the plant grows. Native unimproved soils are what it loves. Cold hardy to the low teens. It has recovered from lower and we’ve seen established shrubs in protected places all over western Oregon. Fantastic performance at the Oregon Coast where it should become a staple landscape shrub. High deer resistance- and that includes Elk on the coast. Takes well to pruning after the first flush of bloom has ended. Hybrid between G. rosmarinifolia and G. juniperina. Evergreen. See video clip below.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Constance’

This is an important hybrid that is among the best known in the United States of G. victorae x G. juniperina. A wiry rounded shrub with thin twisted green leaves that are rolled at the margins. Throughout the year a constant procession of orange/red flowers decks the whole frame. Loved by hummingbirds. To 7′ x 7′ in 7 years in average, well drained soil in full sun with little water once established. Not the hardiest Grevillea and has been superseded by cold hardier and superior varieties- such as ‘Neil Bell’. It is, however, an excellent evergreen shrub for the milder coastal regions. In Portland it is relegated to the warmest urban areas in protected locations. Easy fast shrub that you should protect from subfreezing wind inland. There are enormous specimens on the northern Oregon coast that adore that climate and it is naturally adapted to sandy soils. High deer resistance. Loved by hummingbirds. Prune to contain and maintain a compact habit. Hardy to about 13ºF- or slightly less hardy than ‘Canberra Gem’. Very floriferous.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Leanne’

Handsome evergreen shrub that displays masses of gold/old gold spidery flowers nearly year round- peaking in late winter into spring. Clean paddle shaped leaves are olive green on top and silver gray on the underside- a great combination with the flower color.  Dense growing to 4′ x 6′ in full sun and poor to average well drained soil. Little summer water when established- extraordinarily drought tolerant.  Loved by hummingbirds. One of the easiest to grow and fairly spectacular in full winter bloom. Excellent everblooming shrub for slopes, dry hillsides, low water areas.  Avoid compost, nutrients. Tip prune if growth is too fast or rank and endangers the plant from rocking.  ‘Leanne’ thrives on our own unimproved native soils. Full sun to very light shade and neglect. Excellent cold hardiness. Hybrid between G. victorae and G. juniperina. Avoid summer water which can leave it susceptible to phytophthera. It can tolerate ANY amount of extreme drought with no problem. Nice mounding habit for hot hell strips. Mixes well with Arctostaphylos, other drought adapted shrubs. Gains cold hardiness with age- establishment.  Excellent garden shrub. At one point this and many other hybrids were known for the ranch, Poorinda where they were discovered/bred. That first moniker has been dropped in all of the varieties (Save for x ‘Poorinda Queen’- which, well. Cuz.) So, this is just Grevillea x ‘Leanne’ now. Why they made this change I do not know. Crazy Australians.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Marshall Olbrich’

Pretty and very large Grevillea that deserves the mildest parts of the garden. Small gray leaves are handsome and a great backdrop to the hot orange pendant clusters of flowers. Blooms year round with an especially large flush in spring. Loved by overwintering Anna’s Hummingbirds. Not the hardiest Grevillea- protect from subfreezing east wind- site on a south or west facing aspect. To 9′ x 9′ fast. Plant in UNAMENDED native soil- avoid compost and fertilizer. Supremely drought adapted. Avoid watering in summer. Excellent performance at the Oregon coast. Our stock plant which has thrived for 15 years in a very cold place is situated on a slope with the overhead protection of Douglas firs. Evergreen. High deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Neil Bell’

A chance seedling in Neil Bell’s Monmouth, Oregon garden has yielded one of the finest Grevilleas that we can grow. Neil graciously shared cuttings of this seedling to us. It turned out to be a fantastic shrub and we named it after Neil. Large evergreen shrub with dapper paddle shaped leaves olive green on top and gray underneath. Year round spidery pendant tomato red flowers appear- waxing and waning with the weather- they favor cooler weather. Fast growing and completely drought adapted. Water to establish then none in subsequent years. Takes well to tip pruning. Well drained average to poor soils that have NOT been improved. Adaptable to clay especially on slopes. Loved by hummingbirds and predominantly staked out in winter by Anna’s who recognize it as a superior food source. It has been cold hardy to 5ºF planted in the ground suffering no damage. 8′ x 8′. Cold adapted Grevilleas have flower buds insulated with fine fine hairs- this protects them from the coldest temperatures. Open flowers may be damaged by lows colder than 23ºF but new, protected flower buds will open in the next thaw so the display resumes quickly.  Prune in early summer- this produces a denser shrub and will spur it to into bloom. Grevilleas may have as much as 1/3 of their mass removed annually and will regrow rapidly. This can be useful for shrubs that have grown too fast or rank and need to be stabilized by resizing.  Cut branches with flowers last in a vase in winter and its a great time to have vibrant cut flowers. Do not water during very hot weather- it is adapted to the most desiccating heat and dry with no ill effects. Fantastic shrub. Protected location. Flower buds do not abort in hot dry weather.

Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Octopinky’

This seedling showed up in my garden about 6 years ago. It must have been from ‘Constance’ which froze out but this seedling remained. Curious shrub with congested deep green small leaves lining long arching branches. Shows little interest in branching on its own- you can fix this with a few snips of the terminal ends of the branches. I was amazed to find the peach/pink flowers that arrived one spring. Orange on the outside the perianth reflexes when open to pink and peach.  Its parent plant had flowers of dark orange/red so this was a surprise. It blooms heavily with clusters of small curly flowers, the perianth reflexes and reveals a long style that is actually light brown. Curious shrub for the collector. Its been hardy below 10ºF in 2013 and since then has never shown cold damage . Full sun and average to poor well drained soil. Little to no summer water when established. The arching stems reminded me of an Octopus. Hence the name. To 7” x 4′ at a moderate clip.

Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Poorinda Queen’

Spectacular hybrid Grevillea with fine needle-like foliage produces  a nearly constant parade of soft citrus orange spidery flowers. The perianth is soft orange and the protruding style is red. No matter the weather this carefree shrub seems to be in bloom. Heaviest flowering is in mid-winter just when the gardener needs it most. Large spreading shrub to 8′ x 8′ in poor, well drained native soil. Little to no summer water when established. Very very cold hardy enduring 5ºF with no damage. Give it room to spread as it can grow very fast. Takes light overhead shade if not too dense. Incredibly drought tolerant. Very difficult to propagate but we are always trying to make as much of this awesome shrub as possible. The intensity of the flower color shifts with the seasons gaining vividness with cooler temps. Wonderful winter blooming shrub. Grevillea victorae x Grevillea juniperina.  A Xera favorite. Protected location. Very good in the city of Portland.

 

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘The Precious’

Excellent introduction from Desert Northwest Nursery in Sequim, WA. This seedling of ‘Leanne’ exceeds that cultivar in several ways. First, its a decidedly smaller, needle-like deep green foliage. Second, its profuse flowers are a brighter and lighter yellow that is showy from a distance and great contrast with the darker foliage. This brand new plant is likely to reach 3′ x 5′ in 8 years. Moderately fast growing. Blooms begin in mid-winter and repeat to autumn. They take a brief break late in the year. They are a beacon to hummingbirds as well as gardeners in the the last cold days of winter. Full sun to very light shade in average, un-amended native soils. Good drainage is helpful. Very little to no water once established. Extremely drought adapted. Beautiful, free blooming shrub that has great promise.Somewhat open habit often with a twisting attitude. Lots of character. Thanks, Ian. High deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


We’ve been attempting to hybridize Grevilleas specifically, and that has proven to be difficult. What I rely on then are open pollinated hybrids – all Grevillea species can cross- to explore their very consistent characteristics. This is seed from a hybrid between Grevillea victorae x  Grevillea juniperina ‘Gold’. I sowed a bunch of seed and this seedling stands out as superior to the other seedlings and to many other Grevilleas that we grow. This is an upright growing and then spending evergreen shrub with distinctive small grass green wedge shaped leaves. The flowers are very large for a hybrid and the perianth is a soft citrus pastel orange. The style or pollen presenter begins life after opening with a red/melon color as it ages the style changes to light yellow from the tip down. The base of the style nearest the perianth remains dark melon red. Very heavy blooming selection. Flowers appear January-July and on older plants year round. The large clusters of un opened buds are shaded light pink before opening.  Upright growing then spreading laterally with age. To 4′ tall and 6′ wide. All Grevilleas are a beacon to Hummingbirds and all birds as is this cultivar.  Full sun in average, un-amended soil. Dig a very large hole and water weekly until you see good new growth then taper to once a month. I’m very proud to offer this seedling, it is a vast improvement on other Grevilleas with similar size flowers- this one beats them all. Best in a warm, protected location.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x ‘Xera Red’

A very interesting Grevillea. This is a seedling of ‘Marshall Olbrich’ that appeared in my former garden. For the past 13 years its thrived in that garden reaching 5′ x 6′ forming an open spreading shrub. The evergreen leaves are soft gray on the underside and distinctly pointed. True red flowers appear year round and are a beacon to all hummers. Handsome shrub that has shown consistent hardiness and ease of culture. Full sun and average, native, un- amended soil. Plant this shrub and water until you see good new growth then taper off. For rapidly growing shrubs tip pruning controls not only the size but encourages root stability AND promotes flowering. Prune after a large flush of flowers. Full sun to very light shade in a warm position. Avoid subfreezing wind exposure. In those areas of east wind locate on a south or west facing aspect. Best true red flowers as of yet on a hardy hybrid. Mulch after planting with bark or gravel. Drought adapted when established. Limited quantities. Absolute hummingbird dream.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grevillea x gaudichaudii

Impressive ground cover Grevillea that can be difficult to locate. To less than one foot tall it spreads out laterally easily 8′ wide in 7 years. The distinctly oak shaped leaves on this shrub emerge deep red before settling to green. All the while it is producing red upward facing “toothbrush” shaped flowers. These appear from February to August primarily but can pop off occasionally year round. All together it forms an amazing ground cover shrub that features fantastic foliage and flowers in a bold tapestry display. Cold hardy to a bit less than 10ºF- it appreciates successively colder frosts to harden off for its ultimate frost resistance. Full sun to part shade in average, well drained soil. Light summer water increases the growth rate- and it can zoom once established. Avoid crowding from other plants- it seems to require good air circulation. Excellent performance on gravel mulch. Large rock garden plant or hot slope cover. Protect young plants from temperatures below 15ºF- it can burn the foliage. Hardiness increases with establishment. The very short trunk emerging from the ground can be surprisingly stout- several inches in diameter. Cover with  frost cloth- held down for wind protection during extreme arctic events. Drought adapted when established. A protected location. One of the coolest shrubs we can grow. A naturally occurring hybrid from the Blue Mountains. Excellent around and over boulders which add radiant heat during extreme cold. Should only be attempted in the mildest gardens.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Hakea epiglottis

Beaked Hakea. Out of this world wiry shrub from Tasmania that forms nearly a tree with modified stems that serve as leaves. Fast growing see through plant that casts no shade for full sun and average to poor well drained soil. Proteaceous- avoid fertilizers and compost. Completely drought adapted needing no supplemental water once established.  Water regularly until new growth commences . Forms a large piece of architecture. In early spring tiny sulphur yellow flowers crowd the leaf axils and emit a sweet clove fragrance. Very easy to grow. Cold hardy to 5ºF but avoid blasting subfreezing winds from the gorge. Completely deer resistant. Very inviting  to small birds who will swarm the shrub to find protection in its wiry center- Bush tits adore this shrub To 8′ x 6′ in 5 years. Specimen, unusual hedgerow. Excellent cut material for groovy bouquets. Very fun to grow. Pronounced HAY-kee-uh.

 

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Hakea microcarpa

Unusual tree/shrub from alpine areas of Australia into Tasmania with spiky modified phyllodes as leaves. The spiky leaves are blue green and it forms an airy conifer like large plant very quickly. In spring flossy white flowers crowd the blue green leaf axils and are showy for several weeks. Full sun and average to poor well drained soil. Little summer water once established. Fast growing in youth to its ultimate size. Cold hardy for us to 5ºF but avoid exposure to subfreezing winds. Proteaceous- do not fertilize or even add compost. Un amended native soils are ideal. Very attractive to birds who will use the leaves as perches. Humming birds love this plant in bloom as well. To 9′ tall and 6′ wide in 6 years. Great on slopes. Casts no shade- great textural element year round. High deer resistance. Very unusual plant- out of the ordinary and cool. Pronounced HAY-kee-uh.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lomatia myricoides

River Lomatia is an elegant but always rare evergreen shrub that has been grown for decades in the PNW but has never been common. This high elevation Australian shrub has dazzling long thin foliage with fine and irregular indentations. The upper surface of the leaf is blue green with an underside of pale blue white. In May sweetly fragrant clouds of ivory colored curly flowers eminate from the the ends of each branch. They create a hazy effect over the handsome foliage. Multitrunked shrub to 12′ tall with a pronounced arching habit. You may prune errant horizontal branches in place of vertical to train the shrub to be more upright. Otherwise the splay stems clad in flowers are delightful and elegant rather than sloppy looking. Excellent performance in protected courtyards. Cold hardy near 0ºF (briefly) once established. Native primarily above 3500′ in the Australian mountains. Full sun and a warm position with light, consistent summer water. Accepts regular irrigation better than most proteoides. Tolerates ice and snow- very bendable branches. Cut foliage ( and flowers) is wonderful in arrangements. Could be deer resistant. Beautiful shrub.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lomatia polymorpha

One of the world’s most fascinating shrubs. Polymorpha in this case specifically refers to the leaves which are a different, form, shape, and texture on each individual plant. Very unusual for a hardy shrub. In early summer each form produces upright 5″ tall trusses of ivory/white flowers that are sweetly fragrant- blooms appear for 2 to 3 weeks. An evergreen shrub- usually of fine texture, that grows moderately fast to 3′-6′ in 5 years. In time the shrub will be larger. Full sun and light summer water, avoid sites with standing water in winter. Excellent on slopes. Native to the highest elevations of Tasmania. Its been cold hardy to about 5ºF. In cold gardens I would err on the side of protected. Does not tolerate shade of any kind. Full, all day sun. Light summer water. We have chosen three clones that we think are particularly handsome and we will be trialing those plants. Until then seedlings all with variable foliage are what we offer. Some have a very compact congested habit while others have stretched out and appear to be ultimately larger plants. Excellent as cut foliage as well as cut flowers. A large shrub in full bloom is a beautiful, sophisticated, party of curly ivory flowers. Fantastic. Might be deer resistant. Very good performance at the Oregon coast. Very rare shrub. Proteaceaous- avoid compost and fertilizers. Mulch with bark/ wood chips. Best as a single specimen. Most applicable common name ‘Variable leaf Lomatia’.  That about covers it.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lomatia tinctoria

AKA Guitar Plant from Tasmania. Still can’t tell why its called that. Perhaps the shape of the finely divided leaves? I dunno. Awesome shrub though that only reaches about 4′ high and 3′ wide in 7 years. In mid-late spring amazing 1′ long spikes rise and unfurl a multitude of curly ivory colored flowers. The effect is pure Monet. Compact evergreen for poor to average well drained soil. Little to no summer water when established. Does not do shade, of any kind. Do not try. Best sited in a protected location- against a south or west facing wall for instance. Elegant thing. Thanks, Tasmania.

Photo credit: Loree Bohl (Danger Garden)

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Telopea x ‘Braidwood Seedlings’

Waratah of Australia, this extraordinary shrub produces some of the most alluring flowers in the flower kingdom. A tall growing evergreen shrub with handsome leaves. In spring and often again in late summer crown shaped flowers emerge purple and open to circular red flowers at the branch tips. These are seedlings of Telopea x ‘Braidwood Brilliant’ which is a hybrid selected for excellent cold hardiness for the cut flower trade. Protea- which means you should avoid fertilizer and too much compost. Rich to average soils- pure loam is ideal in a protected location in full sun to part shade. Avoid reflected heat. Light summer water. Not the easiest shrub to establish but the care and patience are worth it in the end. Cold hardy to approximately 5ºF. Protect from subfreezing wind. Amazing cut flower that lasts for weeks in a vase- if you can spare a stem. Excellent performance at the Oregon Coast.  To 12′ x 8′.

Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: