Anemone nemorosa 'Alba Plena'

Anemone nemorosa ‘Alba Plena’

Excellently climate adapted, there are many forms of Anemone nemorosa but this is by far our favorite. Pure white flowers with a congested bunch of petals in the center. Natures pin cushion. Blooms late March to early May. Spreads  to form large colonies in rich well-drained soil with ample irrigation. The whole plant goes completely dormant by summer, cleanly disappearing before you have time to notice it. Part shade to full sun. Not bothered by pests or animals. Even though it goes summer dormant it’s still beneficial for these plants to receive regular water. You’ll notice the difference the following spring.

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Anemone x lipsiensis

Anemone x lipsiensis

Delicate in appearance but actually pretty tough and long lived, this pale yellow-flowered Anemone spreads to form large colonies. To 5″ tall and blooming from March to April. Remains in bloom for several weeks. Rich, well drained soil that retains moisture. Goes completely dormant by the arrival of hot weather- still keep watering – Anemones appreciate that even though they are fast asleep. Very pretty as a color echo with golden foliage such as the acid yellow emerging foliage of Hakonechloa (Japanese Forest Grass).

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Aquilegia chaplinii

Native to the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico and extreme west Texas this adorable columbine enchants us with its whimsical soft yellow flowers and fine blue foliage. To 18″ tall in bloom the petite flowers have long fantastic tails. They appear from April-June, and occasionally again if you remove spent flowers and prevent seed set. This smaller plant has wonderful finely divided blue green foliage that forms a fountain before and after bloom. Often self sows in open sites. The original plants live about 5 years but the distinctive leaves will give away the seedlings. They seem to favor cracks in pavement, stones. Full sun to very light shade in rich to average soil with regular summer water. Mix with our native Columbine (Aquilegia formosa) for a color echo on the yellow perianth of both. Very popular with pollinators including native pollinators. Winter deciduous.  Moderate deer resistance. Charming and easy to grow wild flower.

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Aquilegia formosa

Western Columbine is a wonderful native wildflower that forms almost permanent colonies in part shade. 20″ stems support pendant flowers of vivid orange and yellow. Blooms April-June. Rich, well-drained sites that retain moisture in part shade.Little summer water once established. Finely divided, blue-green leaves are pretty as well. Excellent perennial for naturalizing in part shade and cool environs. Often seen living in a basin of moss and this may be repeated in the garden. Self sows and blue green foliage is distinctive almost immediately. Long-lived when established. Associated plants are Sidalcea campestris, Symphoricarpos albus, Tellima grandiflora. Works well with smaller ferns too.  Oregon native plant.

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Aquilegia longissima ‘Long Spurred’

Stunning columbine native to the American SW that we cherish for its huge flowers trailed by improbably long tails held against blue foliage. Easy to grow late spring bloomer that thrives in many soil types in part shade to full sun with regular summer irrigation. To 14″ tall and becoming a long lived perennial. Winter deciduous. Mix with gold foliaged plants for- a flower color echo. Lovely flower form that hummingbirds and butterflies find delectable.  Easy to grow. High deer resistance. Soaring wonderful, whimsical flowers.

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Aquilegia vulgaris 'Icy Blue'

Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Icy Blue’

Columbines are a blast to grow in the garden. This form we initially selected for its bright, bright, bright chartreuse yellow foliage. The brightest we have seen. In April to June it’s topped with multiple white/green flowers that slowly age to a soft, luminous blue over several days. Very pretty contrast with the foliage and an excellent bold perennial for contrast in a border. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, well-drained soil with consistent summer moisture. When flowers are over you can take advantage of the brilliant leaves. Solidly perennial and the original plant still survives. (We isolate this plant to ensure the babies are as true to the name as possible- and yes it does work).  To 20″ tall and half as wide. Self sows and a large percentage of the seedlings are gold. Easy to spot.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Aquilegia x ‘Xera Tones’

A little wacky columbine sex in our nursery between our native orange and yellow flowering Aquilegia formosa and the brown and green flowered (and fragrant) Aquilegia viridiflora. The color range of the flowers is truly insane. And many of them are fragrant. They also have inherited the very good leaves of A. formosa- which are decidedly blue and delicate looking. They appear to be long lived perennials just as their parents and you just know that these buggers are going to reseed themselves. Part shade to full sun with regular water.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Clematis ‘Rhapsody’

Possibly one of our favorite large flowered Clematis. This delightful 8′-10′ vine has intense sapphire blue flowers that open light and turn to a darker blue as they age. The petals surround a charming boss of creamy stamens. This very showy vine blooms continuously from July-Sept. Its a smaller scale Clematis that can happily climb large shrubs to small trees without smothering them. The flowers which are 5″ across are dramatic and showy from a distance. Easy to grow in our climate, in rich soil with regular summer irrigation. Full sun to the very lightest shade, but flowers are more vivid with sun. The petioles wrap around supports and hoists this plant up. May be hard pruned in early spring to just several buds. This vine which blooms on new wood will quickly regrow and produce a parade of flowers in just several months. Excellent climbing gold leaved shrubs for brilliant contrast. The flowers born on long stems also make a decent cut flower. Provide support such as a large trellis or #4 copper wire to send it climbing around a post. Beautiful Clematis.

 

 

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Clematis cirrhosa 'Lansdowne Gem'

Clematis cirrhosa ‘Lansdowne Gem’

Extraordinary form of the winter blooming Clematis cirrhosa. A vigorous evergreen vine that thrives in part shade to full sun. Beginning in November and continuing unabated to February a continuous supply of 2″ deep velvet red flowers. They are lighter colored on the outside of the petals. Opulent flowers for winter loved by hummingbirds. Flowers are cold hardy to the upper teens and if frozen more buds are waiting in the wings. Easy to grow but provide support as it is vigorous- to 15′ tall shortly. Light summer water in rich, well drained soil. Position where you can look up into the pendant flowers in winter. Loved by Anna’s hummingbirds. Special thanks to Rogerson’s Clematis Garden for suggesting and giving us this plant.

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Clematis cirrhosa 'Wisley Cream'

Clematis cirrhosa ‘Wisley Cream’

Winter doesn’t end the Clematis season and this variety delights from November to February with masses of small cup shaped cream flowers. A very vigorous evergreen vine that prefers part shade to full sun and a large support system. To 15′ tall very quickly. Rich to average well drained soil. Visited by Anna’s hummingbirds. The delicate appearance of this vine belies its vigor. Nice looking glossy foliage. Flowers are cold hardy into the low 20’s and if open flowers are frozen more buds will be waiting for milder weather. in summer this plant goes into a kind of drought dormancy. No water is necessary, the leaves droop and may drop. This is totally normal. This winter growing vine will wake up quickly with the first cool rains. Excellent up a large tree or along a pergola. It may be pruned hard in late summer. Blooms on both old and new wood. Mediterranean.

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Coptis laciniata

Oregon cut leaf gold thread is a widespread but not common evergreen perennial that is found in dry shade on the west side of the Cascades. Native primarily to Oregon it extends north into Washington and is rare south into California.  A colony creating perennial that has handsome, intricate deep green foliage. The arrow shaped leaves are arranged in rosettes along the expanding yellow stolons. The effect is a dense cover that expands at a slow rate. In spring sparse thread like flowers are curious followed by swollen seed pods arranged in a circle. Rich to average soil in shade to dappled shade, though if pushed it can tolerate  a little sun. Good year round appearance. It may be cut back at the end of winter, but I haven’t really found this to be necessary. Use its best attributes, adaptation to dry shade and evergreen good looks as a limited groundcover beneath woodland perennials or at its best on the forest floor. Not a wide scale groundcover and clumps expand at a slow/moderate pace. Not adapted to compacted or clay soils. Best in heavy duff on the forest floor. Great in shade containers at the foot of Aspidistra . Not bothered by deer. Limited quantities. It derives its common name from the bright yellow roots and stolons. Water until you see good new growth then set it free.  Oregon native plant.

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Delphinium menziesii

Menzie’s Larkspur is one of the most widespread species west of the Cascades. That doesn’t mean it easy to grow, and as a crop it can be a pain, That said its one of the ultimate spring flowers and its lost immense amounts of its range in the Willamette Valley to development. This widespread perennial is a  grassland Delphinium that can be found in oak woodlands with Dodecatheon hendersonii, and Plectritis congesta and Romanzoffia californica. The soils that it inhabits run the gamut from sand near the beach to xeric clay in and around the Willamette Valley. This can be a tricky species to establish, my best advice is to double dig a wide area where there is very little competition from other plants. Add a small amount of all organic fertilizer to the hole. Water in well and water again once a week until June. Then you can permanently taper off. That means in subsequent years it will rely on natural rainfall alone. Upright perennial to 20″ tall multiple brilliant blue flowers often with a lighter bee. I’ve also seen them in a deep black/blue velvet purple. Sets seed and goes dormant in mid-summer. Its very very important to protect the emerging plant or seedling from snails and slugs. Bait heavily when you first see growth in late winter.  Though widespread but no longer common this Delphinium seems to adapt best to cultivation with a light gravel mulch. This protects the plant from slugs and provides a perfect medium to germinate the seeds. Very popular pollinator plant visited by all sorts of bees, fly bees, hover flies, butterflies and more. The seedlings are conspicuous and the leaves mimic the parent plant.  Full sun to light shade.  Oregon native plant.

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Delphinium nudicaule

Delphinium nudicaule

Brilliant orange/red tubular flowers each with  two spurs on the rear of the flower. They appear to be swarming around the green wiry stems that support them. To 20″ tall, blooms rising from a basal rosette of leaves. Blooms May-July in Portland. Somewhat tricky southern Oregon native wildflowers that needs a bit of care and correct siting to establish and become perennial. Rich, well drained soil with light but consistent summer moisture. Native to very steep slopes and cliffs with excellent drainage but with groundwater in the form of seeps near by. Wild areas, gravel gardens for the ultimate wildflower effect. Established plants will often re-bloom if spent flower spikes are removed. Hummingbirds. Moderate deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Delphinium trolliifolium

Delphinium trolliifolium

Giant Larkspur or Cow Poison, I prefer the first common name for this stunning large growing native Delphinium. In vernally wet sites to moist upland sites  it forms large spectacular colonies. In late spring and early summer stems that soar to nearly 4′ tall are loosely decorated with marine blue flowers with a lighter central bee. In habitat its common associates are Oregon Ash (Fraxinus latifolius) and Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) where it can be found in the shade of these deciduous trees. The one variable with this Delphinium is that it is found in cool places- never hot and dry. These shadowy environs can make this plant hard to spot even in full bloom.  Often they will be in standing water during the winter months and they are adapted to very heavy wet clay soils. In cultivation the need for moist conditions continues and it does appreciate at least an application of all organic fertilizer and compost at planting time. Keep it well watered through its bloom cycle, then it can go drier but never dust dry- in time it can handle much less irrigation. An annual mulch is beneficial. Wonderful, bold cut flower , but its loved by pollinators as well ( what is it about blue flowers? ). Forms spreading colonies in time. Give it room to stretch out. Its often found with our native Cow Parsnip (Hieracleum maximum) and great Camas ( Camassia leichtlinii) in habitat. This could easily be replicated in a garden. Native to the Willamette Valley into the Columbia River Gorge. Once widespread in the Willamette Valley its territory has shrunk precipitously. Long lived perennial. Very good deer resistance. Extremely showy in bloom.   Oregon native plant.

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Downingia elegans

Calico flower is a widespread showy annual of vernally wet sites throughout our region.  A low spreading plant that rises up in bloom to reveal shovel shaped blue and white flowers. They closely resemble annual Lobelia (Lobelia erinus) to which it is closely related. Blooms appear from Mid May to early August. Rich soil with regular summer water. Downingia is native to areas that are often submerged in winter. And in the garden it appreciates ample water. Full sun and resists competition from other plants. Very good in rain gardens. One potted plant will expand to 2′ with rising showy flowers. Loved by pollinators of all kinds. Excellent container plant. You can simply remove it when it has completed its life cycle- replace with warm season annuals. A food source for the endangered Willamette Valley endemic Fendler’s Blue Butterfly. Leave established plants in place once they have died to distribute seed for the following year in the ground.  Oregon native plant

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Helleborus x ‘Amethyst Glow’ Winter Jewels ®

Kind of a nifty color breakthrough for the breeding team Ernie and Marietta O’byrne. We’ve been delighted with this soft pewter purple color on a vigorous group of plants that produce enormous blooms. To 2′ x 2′ for shade to part shade in rich, well composted soil. Light summer water. High deer resistance.

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Helleborus x ‘Apricot Blush’ Winter Jewels ®

One of our favorite strains of Hellebore hybrids by the O’Byrnes at Northwest Garden Nursery. Single, large flowers are blushed apricot, russet, to almost orange. Blooms January-April. Vigorous plants. Regular summer water in well composted soil in shade to part shade. To 2′ x 2′.  Great deer resistance.

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Helleborus x ‘Black Diamond’ Winter Jewels ®

The darkest black flowers on a Hellebore that we have encountered. Jet black flowers have a sheen. Great in combination with the deep maroon/purple new foliage. To 2′ x 2′ blooming from January-April. Light, consistent summer water in part shade to shade. Completely deer resistant.

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Helleborus x ‘Blue Diamond’ Winter Jewels ®

Well, blue may be a stretch but this difficult to photograph hue at least attains hints of the color. More aptly its a luminous pewter shade that seems to reflect light in a metallic way. Strong growing perennial for part shade to shade in rich, well composted soils. Regular summer water- though it takes dry conditions in the shade. In extreme drought the leaves will simply lie on the ground- rising up almost immediately with water. Blooms appear from late January and are effective until April. To 2′ tall and as wide in several years. Excellent in combination with the yellow flowered series ‘Golden Sunrise’. Highly deer resistant and long lived. Remove self sown seedlings which will unlikely come true to the parent. A special color.

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Helleborus x ‘Cherry Blossom’ Winter Jewels ®

One of the best strains from the master Hellebore breeders the O’Byrnes. The majority of these seedling feature semi-double or double blushed pink flowers. Even the single flowered plants are well formed and vivid. Part shade to shade in well composted soil with light consistent summer water. To 2′ x 2′ shortly. High deer resistance.

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Helleborus x ‘Cotton Candy’ Winter Jewels ®

Regal strain of double flowered Hellebores from the O’Byrnes. The colors vary but many are light pink with a pronounced picotee on each row of petals. And there are many. The more substance to the flower the longer it remains showy and these already bloom from February to April. To 2′ x 2′ vigorous plants for rich, well drained soil and regular summer water.

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Helleborus x ‘Golden Lotus’ Winter Jewels ®

Spectacular strain of hybrids with fully double flowers. They range in color from lime green to vibrant chartreuse/light yellow. Blooms appear in January and remain showy and effective for several months. The flower retaining their form after they have released their pollen. To 2′ x 2′ forming an expanding clump in part shade to shade in well composted garden soil. Light consistent summer water. Highly deer resistant. Evergreen.

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Helleborus x ‘Golden Sunrise’ Winter Jewels ®

The more we grow Hellebores the more we can advise which are truly the most spectacular to grow. ‘Golden Sunrise’ is a strain that sports true luminous yellow flowers (often with extra markings on the inside). Large vigorous plants whose foliage takes on yellow tints in winter- part of the yellow flower coloration shining through. Don’t be alarmed. These yellow flowers show up from a much farther distance than any other. Easy to grow shade perennial for well composted soil and light but consistent summer moisture. Deer resistant.

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Helleborus x ‘Jade Star’ Winter Jewels ®

Understated but beautiful strain of hybrids that have simple single flowers marked with jade green and brushed with maroon highlights. Finely divided leaves are handsome also. To 2′ x 2′ in rich, well composted soil in part shade to shade with regular summer irrigation. Completely deer resistant.

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Helleborus x ‘Ruby Wine’ Winter Jewels ®

We’ve fallen in love with this richly colored strain of Hellebores. Vivid and intense true wine red flowers are effective both up close and at a distance. Paired with the maroon new growth and you get a good looking total perennial. Hellebores bloom non-stop from February to April The large flowers of this strain do not fade with age. To 2′ x 2′ for part shade and rich, well composted soil. Light but consistent summer water.

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Helleborus x ‘White Pearl’ Winter Jewels ®

There is no doubt that white flowers show up the best from a distance and this is no different with Hellebores. This strain of variants on white has single to semi-double flowers often marked with dots of red or green. Elegant, fascinating flowers that remains showy for months. To 2′ x 2′ in part shade to shade in rich, well composted soil Regular summer water. High deer resistance.

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Helleborus x sternii ‘Pewter Leaf’

There are so many Hellebores flooding the market these days that this really good variety has been sidestepped. Bad move. It has so many great attributes that we can’t help but offer it. Large divided evergreen thick leaves are a scintillating metallic pewter. The undersides of the leaves are soft red. Great combination. In winter simple cupped celadon green flowers pop out of the top and remain fresh and showy for many weeks. To 2′ x 2′ and completely evergreen. Produces multiple stems as the years pass on. Excellently adapted to our climate and dry shade specifically. Light summer water in average to rich soil. Full sun to part shade to shade. High deer resistance. Long lived sturdy and pretty.

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Helleborus x sternii ‘Variegata’

The O’Byrnes gave us this strain of the variegated form of Helleborus x sternii. Inheriting cold tolerance from H. corsica and nifty, thick palmate leaves from the more tender H. lividus .The result is a tough plant with green cupped flowers stained rose on the outside of the bell. The flowers remain effective for several months. Not quite as long as the straight H. x sternii, but a relatively long time. A shrubby species with large evergreen leaves. They are heavily speckled with cream dots with an underside to the leaves and the stems tinted pink. The palmate leaves become large and arching. Full sun with more frequent irrigation to full  shade with less. To 2′ x 2′. Deer and possibly rabbit resistant. The rough leaves resist weather. Site as you would for a small shrub. It is elegant with other woodlanders or can be grown with drought tolerant to low water plants even in full sun. Flower bend over enshrouded in a cup shape that protects the pollen from rain and the vagaries of winter weather.  Blooms January with flowers effective for three months. Great, sophisticated but tough plant for rural areas. May be afflicted with aphids in late spring. Hose those off or do not look closely.

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Nigella sativa

Wonderful multi-use hardy annual that we love for its flowers, seed heads, and edible seeds. Love-in-a-Mist is the common name in reference to the mostly dark blue flowers that are ensconced in a haze of fine green stems. This is a charming cut flower.  Upon finishing the ovaries transform to a ballon shaped structure full of yummy black seeds. You can then detach that as a cut flower as well. The dried black seeds have a peppery taste and are excellent sprinkled on salads. Be sure to sprinkle them on the ground where next year’s crop will be. Truth is once you plant this it is pretty much as permanent as a perennial, so reliable and prolific a re-seeding plant. The ferny seedlings are easy to spot, move or dispatch. Let them flow through your perennial borders. They make a wonderful addition to a cutting garden. Best in rich, open, disturbed soil with supplemental H20 all the way until seed are produced- though not entirely necessary it produces larger plants- and there fore stems, flowers, and more seeds. Blooms June-July. Full sun to light shade. VERY EASY.

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Ranunculus occidentalis

Western Buttercup is our own wonderful wildflower. This is the real thing and NOT the invasive Ranunculus ficaria or repens. Traditionally it occupies open Oregon Oak woodlands and meadows including vernally wet meadows. Though it handles winter inundation it is also adapted to upland situations and in every biome it goes quickly summer dormant. Rosettes of pretty pinked leaves elongate in bloom to an airy spray of bright yellow flowers. Intimately, the petals have a glossy sheen. And growing up in the country it was traditional to put a picked flower under your chin and the reflected color yellow revealed that indeed you did like butter. Great cut flower that peaks on May Day and has made many a wild flower bouquet with purple Oregon Iris and purple Dodecatheon hendersonii- Shooting stars. Pictured here with Common Camas Camassia quamash at the Camassia reserve in West Linn, Oregon. Blooms from mid-April to early June. Vast meadows of western Oregon still harbor this sweet short lived perennial. Adapted to heavy clay soils- reseeds when happy. Suitable for mowed meadows as long as it has gone to seed by the time you mow. Wait until June.  Good competitor with invasives and absolutely integral to a Willamette Valley meadow. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant

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Birds foot buttercup is one of the more common varieties in  Oregon. Larger (taller) than Ranunculus occidentalis it also has a darker almost maroon gray coloring on the back of each petal. Birds foot buttercup thrives in areas that are often submerged in winter Though it favors wet sites in will easily accommodate dry conditions as well and is happy in upland situations.  Short lived perennial (3-5 years). Blooms about three weeks after western buttercup.  in April to June. The whole plant goes quickly summer dormant after setting seed in conspicuous spiked capsules. Easy to grow in gardens as this species is used to regular moist soil. To 14″ x 18″wide. Very forgiving native that will happily reseed if given room. Excellent applications in a rain garden.   It makes a pleasant cut flower too with the same reflective inner petals. Not bothered by deer or rabbits. Rich to average soils and especially heavy clay soils. Good native pollinator plant.  Oregon native plant.

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Tall Thalictrum or Many fruited Rue. A wonderful native perennial that will win you over with its great grace and tenacity. Many divided blue green leaves are composed like shelves along a tall blooming stem. The effect is that of a pastry tray with multiple levels. In early spring a group of these pretty and delicate looking leaves are arranged in a circle. As the spring advances so does the bloom stalk up to 4′ tall in rich soil with regular water. Best with an occasional deep soak in summer, native primarily to wet  areas. Its very common companion is Giant Larkspur Delphinium trolliifolium and both species of Camas. The flower that erupts from a  many branched scape holds mostly downward pointing stamens with very small modest petals. It perches on the end of the stem like a small chandelier. Winter deciduous. Found primarily in the moist areas west of the Cascades in the inland valleys. Very easy to grow native perennial that improves under cultivation but retains its feral tough habit. Long lived perennial for part shade to high over head shade. Not bothered by deer. Oregon native plant.

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Thalictrum occidentale

Smaller growing western meadow rue is a resident of deep moist woods as well as the margins of streams. Many divided leaves are delicate and flutter in the slightest breeze. Each indented leaflet is perched in the arrangement of an arrow. In mid to late spring wiry stems extend above the 1′ tall foliage another 10″ and displays flowers that are comprised of raspberry and brown downward pointed flowers. They make an evenly distributed display that is not so much showy as it is incredibly graceful. Loved by pollinators who swing by for the suspended pollen. Best in enriched soil with consistent irrigation in summer. It spreads to form large colonies and is exceptionally pretty crawling up a low bank or hill. Winter deciduous perennial. This species which is more of an upland species requires a little less water than the similar but taller Thalictrum fendleri but it still requires irrigation in summer, even when well established. Benefits greatly from a top dressing of mulch. Companion plants in habitat are Tellima grandiflora, Mitella, Heuchera and Delphinium . Prefers protection from mid day sun and will burn and/ or die in hot dry situations. ‘Forms expanding colonies. Very good woodland pollinator perennial with a wonderful texture. Moderately deer resistant. Oregon native plant.

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Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn4b -20º to -25ºF
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