Acaena 'Blue Haze'

Acaena ‘Blue Haze’

The blue form of New Zealand Burr with finely divided pinnate evergreen foliage that forms a vigorous creeping ground cover. In summer 3″ stems support round white flowers that appear for several weeks. Easy to grow dense-growing plant to 3″ tall and covering up to 3 square feet in a year. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer moisture to speed growth and keep the appearance fresh. Best in part shade to shade- seems to resent hot sun and permanently dry positions. Excellent for a fast cover that blocks weeds and roots as it grows- perfect erosion control for steep shady slopes. Plant on 1′ centers for a fast cover. Adaptable to dry conditions when established.

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Acaena inermis 'Purpurea'

Acaena inermis ‘Purpurea’

Such a good good plant. The purple-foliaged New Zealand Burr covers the ground in pinnate dark purple foliage. Low spreading evergreen ground cover for full sun to part shade in rich, well drained, moisture retentive soils. Avoid compacted dry soils- it will die out. Instead provide an annual mulch of compost- put it right over the leaves and let the foliage grow up through it. This will give you a dense spectacular ground cover in scintillating purple. Excellent as an understory in containers as well. In summer sporadic 4″ stems support spiky maroon orbs- these are the flowers. New Zealand.

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Alchemilla alpina

Alchemilla alpina

Our friend Anna Kulgren shared this handy and pretty little perennial ground cover with us. Palmate grass green foliage is lined in fine silver fur- very pretty for this hardy deciduous plant. In spring clusters of chartreuse flowers foam above the plant. Full sun and rich, well drained soil. To just several inches high (if that) it spreads happily to several feet wide. Just aggressive enough to  out compete weeds.This would be a great low plant between pavers. Also, at the foot of borders or  along paths. Simple, easy to grow plant.

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Aruncus dioicus

Aruncus dioicus

Goats Beard is a big bold and easy to grow perennial for part shade and perpetually wet sites. To 4′ tall and as wide with large fountains of pure white flowers in late spring to early summer. Native in seeps and along watercourses, mimic those conditions in your garden and you’ll have success. Long lived plant that develops a woody base. Completely winter deciduous. Excellent combined with other mesic water loving plants. Tolerates some inundation but not during the growing season. Often found on cliffs away from the browse of deer. Very large permanent perennial in time.  Fall color is often yellow. Widespread in the PNW. Oregon native plant.

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Eriobotrya japonica

Eriobotrya japonica

Loquat is much hardier than most people think. Enormous specimens are ancient and scattered around Portland. In my previous garden I had a huge specimen that sailed through the worst winters (below 10ºF) and epic ice and snow with NO damage. Bold, broadleaved evergreen tree. The leaves are huge and look very tropical. In winter buds clad in brown fur support many very fragrant white flowers. Loved by overwintering Anna’s Hummingbirds. If the winter fizzles out and temperature fail to drop below 20ºF you may see the small, sweet fruits ripen in summer to early autumn. Primarily it is grown for its great foliage and convenient size. To 18′ tall and 10′ wide forming a rounded crown in 10 years. Full sun and rich to average soil. Completely drought adapted but summer water will increase the growth rate. Hardy to 5ºF and does not suffer foliage damage until that point is reached. Avoid growing this tree in the windy eastern exposed suburbs of Portland. Excellent tree for a small garden. Japan.

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Filipendula palmata 'Variegata'

Filipendula palmata ‘Variegata’

Obscure large herbaceous perennial that finds a happy home in the rich soil and regular moisture of woodlands and margins. To 5′ tall the handsome palmate leaves are edged in white with occasional splashes in the interior. In mid summer plumes of foamy white flowers tower over the plant. Very pretty. Completely deciduous in winter. In time it forms large patches. Woodlands, the back of the border, perpetually wet areas.

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Filipendula ulmaria 'Aurea'

Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’

Gold plants are so popular in our climate perhaps because they add light to the garden when the sky is leaden and dark. This brilliant handsome perennial does just that. Bright gold pinnate leaves are arranged in a circular rosette to 2′ across. In summer 20″ spikes rise and produce foamy white flowers. A good combination overall. Rich, moisture retentive soil in part shade to shade. It doesn’t go green in shade either- remains vibrant. Excellent woodland focal point and adaptable to permanently wet sites. Long lived easy to grow perennial.

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Fragaria chiloense 'Aulon'

Fragaria chiloense ‘Aulon’

Pacific coastal strawberry is a beach native- in fact it occurs all around the Pacific Rim and makes an adorable and durable ground cover on sand dunes. Well this version is like the giant hulk of strawberries. Huge in every way and vigorous? Wow, plant and get out of the way. The large glossy evergreen leaves are up to 6″ across and the single white flowers in spring and summer (sometimes in winter) are large also. The paltry fruit that follows is far from edible. It won’t kill you but you really have to like sour and gritty with millions of seeds.  This is an ideal ground cover for rough sites in full sun to part shade. Don’t bother enriching the soil that will just make this trailing monster roar. Instead err on the side of a little neglect and watch what this native plant can do. Be wary of delicate plants in the vicinity. Evergreen, easy and drought tolerant. Oregon native plant.

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Fragaria vesca 'Golden Alexandria'

Fragaria vesca ‘Golden Alexandria’

Haute edible gardening meet haute ornamental gardening. This cheerful and bright woodland strawberry sets shade alight and continuous small white flowers turn into tasty red berries all summer long. Pair in part shade with Hakenochloa macro ‘All Gold’ Japanese forest grass for a great color echo and contrast in leaf shapes. To 6″ tall and maintaining a clump in part shade and rich, moisture retentive soil. May self sow and gold seedlings are easy to spot and move or give away. Such a good idea for many reasons.

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Fragaria vesca var. bracteata

Fragaria vesca var. bracteata

Woodland strawberry that is native to large parts of Oregon. This upright growing smaller strawberry is delightful when pristine white flowers morph into sweet pendant red fruits. To 10″ tall and as wide this clumping plant expands at a moderate clip forming patches in rich to average soil with light, consistent summer moisture. Blooms in April- fruit arrives in June. This is the locally native form of this widespread plant. In France the same species is famous as Fraise du Bois. Our local species in Oregon will produce several rounds of fruit with reliable irrigation. This is not a long lived species and it seems to find its happy place on its own. Expect several years lifespan and leave fruit on the plant annually to ensure reseeding. Great in containers. Use in partly shady borders, its a diminutive plant and fits nicely among larger perennials. Great for fresh eating…and dogs like them too so protect from marauding pooches. Very natural lining woodland paths. Semi-deciduous to winter deciduous. Native to the Portland city limits. Oregon native plant

 

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Geum ‘Blazing Sunset’

Gems are so useful for us because they virtually laugh at heavy clay soils and still perform. But better is rich amended soil and they will bloom- in the case of this cultivar almost non-stop through the heat of summer. 2′ tall divided spikes yield fully double large brilliant orange red flowers. Opulent but with a wildflower charm at the same time. A big ol branch of flowers makes a great cut flower that lasts for ore than a week. Full sun to light shade and regular summer water. Remove spent flowers to encourage more- and there will be quickly. Forms a substantial patch in a few years. Very long lived perennial. Match with blue flowered Salvias for a thrilling visual bonanza. Completely deciduous in winter.

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Geum ‘Herterton Primrose’

Elegant spring blooming perennial that is very graceful, understated but beautiful. From rosette of lush leaves it sends up branched stems at the end of each is a soft primrose colored nodding flower from a madder red calyx. Wonderful. It remains in bloom and actually re-blooms from early April to early June. To 18″ tall in bloom and forming a patch several feet across. Full sun to part shade in rich, moisture retentive soil. Regular summer water is beneficial. Excellent and fun cut flower. Adapted to clay soils as many Geums are and a great reason to grow them in Western Oregon. Winter deciduous.

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Geum triflorum ‘Ochocos’

From one of our favorite mountain ranges in Oregon The Ochocos Greg spotted this great form of Prairie Smoke. Pretty spreading perennial with gray green divided leaves and in summer upright then nodding pink fur covered buds that mostly overlap small pink petals. Its glory shines when these flowers go to seed. The stems turn straight up and fluffy silver seed heads puff up and wave in the breeze like smoke. Full sun and well drained soil of average fertility. Light summer water. To 2′ x 2′ slowly. Completely deciduous in winter. Ultra cold hardy Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction. 

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Gillenia trifoliata (Porteranthus)

Indian Bow root is an elegant perennial native to the eastern U. S.. Finely divided handsome leaves rise up on 3 stems that support a myriad of small delicate pure white flowers in May/June. The foliage remains handsome following bloom and in autumn turns raspberry red  and holding before falling down. Slowly increasing clumps in rich soil with regular summer moisture. Full sun  to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Long lived carefree perennial. Extremely cold hardy. Winter deciduous.

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Heteromeles arbutifolia

Toyon. One of the most widespread shrubs in California this plant also known as Christmas berry ranges right up to the Oregon State line and appears just inside our border. Large evergreen shrub with finely serrated large green leaves. In late spring flat clusters of white flowers appear- they are pretty but nothing compared to the brilliant red berries that follow and ripen in early autumn- remaining showy through winter. Most often they are eaten by birds. AKA Hollywood this shrub is where that city got its name. heh. Fast growing to 13′ tall by 10′ wide in 10 years in our climate if left strictly unpruned. Slightly tender it requires a protected location. Most large established specimens I’ve seen around Portland are placed on the west or south side of large trees. They get the protection of the overstory and it shields them from the coldest winds. No water or regular water- either way, very adaptable shrub that really likes cultivation. Small tree in time. West coast native evergreen shrub for the mildest gardens. Oregon native plant.

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Holodiscus discolor

Ocean Spray is a well known shrub west of the Cascades. It occupies dry woods in part shade to full sun. Large and spreading it displays foamy white clusters of flowers in early summer. They age to a tan color before falling apart. Handsome small scalloped leaves are very pretty and turn yellow to orange in autumn. To 9′ x 7′ very quickly in virtually any soil type. Extremely drought adapted when established- but amenable to light irrigation in summer. Wild look for wild areas, match with native perennials. Often suckers to form patches and it is common for seedlings to show up around the parent plant. These can be moved when young or dispatched. Birds adore the dried seeds in winter. Pretty native in the Rose family. Moderate deer resistance- but sometimes they attack it if it is newly planted so protect. Winter deciduous. Oregon native plant.

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Lyonothamnus floribundus ssp. Asplenifolius

Catalina Ironwood is a tree locally native to the Channel Islands off of Southern California. Surprisingly hardy once established and older this spectacular evergreen tree in the rose family boasts amazing divided foliage with symmetrical scalloped serrations along each margin. Very pretty. The glossy aromatic leaves are seen to great advantage against the straight, red exfoliating trunk. In spring flat umbels of white flowers appear all over the tree. Fast growing in youth to its ultimate size here 25’+ tall in 15 years. Requires a protected location- such as against the wall of a large building. Avoid direct exposure to subfreezing wind. Little water once established. Wonderful tree for courtyards- protected areas. Fantastic performance at the Oregon Coast. Protect young trees from temperatures below 15ºF- wrap or swaddle in burlap or remay until arctic weather has passed. Reaches its full hardiness several years in the ground. There is a wonderful mature specimen of this tree at the McMennamens in St. John in PDX and scattered large specimens occur around the city. Nice, nice urban tree.

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Nevuisia alabamensis

Cool shrub in the rose family that is native to the state of Alabama. To 5′ x 5′ light green serrated leaves are pretty. In April/May the entire shrub is smothered in white flowers made up entirely of stamens. No petals here. Graceful and durable deciduous shrub for part shade to high overhead shade. Regular soil including heavy clay soils. Light, consistent summer water. Soak once every 2 weeks. Fall color is yellow to light orange. Long lived and easy to grow unusual shrub of great grace. Avoid blasting sun and extreme drought.

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Potentilla aff. gelida

We’ve grown this stunning perennial for years but there has always been some question to the exact species. All we know is that for foliage there really is nothing like it. Large spreading rosettes of pure metallic silver pinnate leaves are gorgeous all season. In summer and not very prolifically sporadic spikes of small yellow flowers rise above the foliage. Not the point of this plant and they can be removed if they are a distraction. To 1′ tall and forming a large patch in RICH, moisture retentive soil in full sun to light shade. Established plants can get by with much less water. Performance is equally as good in either position. Completely deciduous in winter. Beautiful leaves.

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Potentilla gracilis ssp. gracilis

Slender Cinquefoil is a common, somewhat quiet but easy to grow long lived native perennial. Palmate leaves are conspicuously serrated on long stems. In early to mid summer 20″ stems support multiple clumps of sunny single yellow flowers. Full sun to part shade in average to enriched soil. Water to establish the first season then let it go with seasonal rainfall. Wild looking perennial that shines in borders, among shrubs and along the urban wild lands interface. Very pretty clustered at the foot of Holodiscus whose bloom is simultaneous. Loved by pollinators and an important food source for  many butterflies. Native from SW. British Columbia south to San Diego County California. Often found in Ponderosa pine forests. Blooms much more heavily in full sun and improves under cultivation. Winter deciduous. Little deer resistance. Rose family. These are seed raised from Willamette Valley populations so it is the local form.  Oregon native plant.

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Prunus mume ‘Kobai’

Sophisticated winter blooming tree that we love for its incredibly sweet spicy scented flowers.  Double pink flowers are conspicuous and perched perfectly on the green twigs of this asian flowering apricot. Flowers appear in December in mild years as late as February in the coldest. Flowers last forever in the cool winter air. Each spicily scented flower has a prominent boss of white stamens. Its the details man. Flowers are hardy to around 20ºF- closed buds are substantially hardier and will unfurl when the weather warms. Moderately fast growing tree to 18′ x12′ in 10 years. Appreciates deep, rich soil and definitely weekly summer water in its first few years. Fall color is pale yellow. Inedible ornamental fruits often follow the blossoms. Japan.

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Pyracantha x fortuneana ‘Graberi’

The best firethorn for our region. Glossy evergreen foliage is handsome year round. In summer flat clusters of off while small flowers transform into clusters of vivid true red berries. They ripen by autumn and remain showy all winter. Often they are completely consumed by birds. Extremely drought tolerant shrub for full sun to quite a bit of shade. Very fast growing in any well drained soil to 9′ x 8′ in 5 years. It makes a fantastic espalier tolerating the hottest walls. Prune AFTER flowering has ended. Blooms/fruits on wood from the previous year. Respectably deer resistant. Thorny- be careful in siting. Very fast growing even with no irrigation. Easy to prune. Plant on 3′ centers for a dense hedge. Beautiful RED berries.

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Rhaphiolepis umbellata

Yeddo Hawthorne long grown in the PNW and an excellent low, evergreen, very drought tolerant shrub. In spring spikes are lined with multiple clear white fragrant flowers. The flowers are easy to identify in the rose family. Moderate to slow and dense growing shrub to 4′ tall by 4′ wide in 6 years. The rounded thick leaves are resistant to black spot which can afflict this genus- it also appreciates an open exposure with good air circulation. Small blue berries follow the flowers- kind of showy. Takes intensely hot locations with no summer water and thrives. Also, it accepts regular irrigation no problem. Average to rich, well drained soil. Not deer resistant at all- Rose family- deer lunch. Excellent performance in harsh urban conditions. Japan.

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Rhaphiolepis umbellata ‘Blueberry Muffin’

Excellent release from the JC Raulston Arboretum in Raliegh, NC. This dense and rounded shrub is useful for its size- 3′ x 3′ in 7 years- or longer. But it has many other fine points. The leaves are thinner than normal with this species which is native to Japan. It is very very black spot resistant and the leathery glossy leaves turn from olive green/gray in summer to amazing stains of maroon and purple with cooler temperatures. New growth is light beige and coated in furry indumentum before becoming glossy.  A fascinating and beautiful display. White flowers appear in May and are followed by fairly showy blue berries. Extremely drought tolerant and tolerant of high heat. Excellent on south facing walls or exposed urban situations with reflected heat. Handsome at all times and very easy to grow. Grows about 4″ per year. Nice measured growth that forms a rounded upright shrub. Excellent companion for other drought adapted shrubs-landscapes. It also accepts regular irrigation in summer- a useful adaptation for an already useful shrub. Full sun to part shade.

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Rhaphiolepis umbellata ‘Emerald Waves’

Our selection of the tough and adaptable evergreen Yeddo Hawthorne. Each glossy, thick rounded leaf on this cultivar is wavy (undulate) and gives this smaller shrub extra substance. In spring large clusters of pure white flowers cover the whole plant. Often showy blue berries follow. Great resistance to black spot- the best of any we’ve grown. Full sun to very light shade in average to enriched soil. To 3′ x 3′ in 6 years. A long lived shrub that tolerates a great amount of summer drought but greets regular irrigation with equanimity.  A frequent component of Japanese style gardens for its simple and clean habit. Takes blasting heat very well, including blazing western exposures that are shady for most of the day. Cold hardy to 5ºF or briefly lower. Great low water landscape plant. Rose family- not deer resistant. Japan.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Rhaphiolepis umbellata var. minor

Excitement doesn’t really well up with this genus. The reason we grow this plant is that it is healthy, drought adapted, and handsome all the time. And its a great scale and is slow growing. Dense evergreen shrub with wavy deep green foliage. New growth is conspicuously tinted red. In spring clusters of pure white flowers are pretty if not enough to stop a car. To 3′ x 3′ in 8 years. Yep. Slow growing and a great size for full hot sun to light shade and rich to average soil. Drought adapted when established it will also accept regular irrigation. Somewhat formal appearance and a great backdrop to other plants. A nice formal hedge plant or left to its own devices an informal hedge. Clusters of blue berries often follow the flowers and are added interest. NOT DEER RESISTANT. Rose family. Excellent performance in tough urban sites. Including unwatered parking strips. Grouped tougher it can form a low groudcover (3′ high). Regular water to establish. Dwarf japanese yedda hawthorne.

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Rhaphiolepis x delacourii

Unusual hybrid India hawthorn that you rarely see anymore in our area. Its a great, tough, extremely drought tolerant evergreen shrub. To 4′ x 4′ in 7 years. Waxy deep green leaves emerge a soft pink/amber. In early to mid spring upright clusters of pink flowers are very pretty. They can then occur sporadically all year. Slow growing shrub for full sun and good air circulation. Excellent shrub to combat Rhododendron fatigue in spring. Good looking year round. Accepts regular summer water but thrives on none when established. Useful for blasting hot locations. Easy to grow long lived hardy broad leaved evergreen. Rhaphiolepis indica x Rhaphiolepis umbellata. Nice plant.

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Rosa ‘Betty Prior’

With all the knock out, fleurshrubselekt® and every other patented type of rose its reassuring that this old gal still rocks them all. Betty bears clusters of slightly fragrant large single pink flowers. They are light pink w/ a slightly darker sheen to the surface of the petals which almost always open skyward. These upright facing groups of flowers yield not only a lot of color- it blooms constantly from May to frost, it gives the plant a wild appeal not seen in overly bred shrubs. The disease resistant foliage is mid green and handsome as well. To 8′ x 4′ forming a tall bloomy shrub. left unpruned it makes a great climbing rose and will unobtrusively scale small trees, deck railings. It may be hard pruned in early spring if necessary. Remove spent flowers and more will quickly appear. Tough plant that gets by on a less than perfect watering regime.  Regular, deep watering (once a week max) will yield great performance. Established plants can take drought at the expense of re-blooming. Very easy to grow charming rose. Ultra cold hardy.

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Rosa ‘Darlow’s Enigma’

Curious climbing rose that puts on a non-stop display of sprays of intensely fragrant flowers that are diminuitive, white, and semi-double. The anise/fruit scented flowers begin in mid-spring and continue unabated until autumn. A large growing rose to 12′ tall and 8′ wide in time. Excellent trained on a trellis or pergola. Blooms on wood from the current season and may be hard pruned in early spring. This rose seedling was discovered in a garden in Eugene and its popularity has spread throughout the globe. The sweet fragrance will perfume an entire garden on a warm summer day. Captivating cut flower. Disease resistant and very tough rose that gets by on a minimum amount of summer water and still blooms. Regular water in rich soil amplifies this roses performance dramatically. Winter deciduous. Extremely cold hardy.

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Rosa ‘Radway Sunrise’

Years ago I was searching through old and obscure rose catalogs with one goal in mind. Find a single rose that changes color after it opens. The idea was to mimic Rosa x mutablilis  but in different color shades or on a hardier plant. Man did we score. If we could grow only one rose this would be it. ‘Radway Sunrise’ produces large single flowers in clusters that open pale yellow- change to orange and arrive at strong carmine pink. A brilliant multicolored effect on a strong growing virus free and disease resistant rose. Typically grows to 7′ tall in a single season and is amenable to life as a climber too. Rapid re-bloom all summer. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular summer water. Prune this shrub rose hard in mid-February. The fragrant flowers will form hips that ripen in autumn. Great, great rose.

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Rosa glauca (rubrifolia)

The invaluable red or purple leaved rose. Beautiful foliage has hints of blue and with the single pink flowers in May/June its sublime. These are followed by clusters of showy orange hips. To 7′ x 7′ very quickly in full sun and well drained soil of average to rich fertility. Avoid standing water in winter. Very drought tolerant and easy to grow rose with a minimum of thorns. Large arching habit makes it a natural summer scaffold for smaller Clematis. Long lived, cold hardy. Orange fall color. Extremely cold hardy to zone 2 (-40ºF). Tends to be thornier when young. Older established plants have less. Blooms on wood from the previous year, prune if needed after flowering has ended. Hips are bold and last well in wreaths, swags, bouquets. This tough plant finds a home from the back of pampered borders to freeway verge plantings in Washington State.  Long lived. Remove spent wood in winter- it will appear gray. Grown from seed.

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Rosa nutkana ‘Xera Pink’

Silently living its beautiful life in a seasonally flooded ditch near our wholesale nursery we spotted this deep pink flowering variant of our locally native Nootka rose.  Intensely fragrant deep pink single flowers appear from May-July. followed by brilliant red hips that ripen in fall. The first and second year canes carry a heavy mahogany tone that is as conspicuous as the deep pink showy flowers. An incredibly tough and adaptable native rose that can endure both seasonally flooded locations and desiccating summer drought. Even the foliage has a sweet fragrance. Carefree shrub that spreads to form colonies and rises to about 4′ tall on average. Laughs at the heaviest, driest clay soils. Red/orange fall color. Not a shrub for shy neighbors, this rose will win. Give it ample room and plan ahead.  Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Rosa sericea var. pteracantha

Blood thorn rose. Justifiably famous for the sanguine glowing red hue of the thorns on new growth. Back lit by the sun it would make a vampire very very hungry. Large growing species rose that also features 1″ fragrant single white flowers en masse on wood from the previous season. Established plants (1-2 years in the ground) may be coppiced in early spring to emphasize and create new wood clad in thorns. If allowed to mature a year  or two the thorns fade  to gray but then you are rewarded with scintillating flowers in May/June. Full sun and virtually any soil, including heavy clay. But avoid standing water in winter. Average, regular irrigation in summer keeps it looking fresh. Old specimens can make do with little water. If you do coppice this plant for thorns make sure you follow up with a bit of fertilizer (a handful of all organic fertilizer 9.3.4) and regular water to ensure regrowth is robust. Winter deciduous- fall color is orange red and brief. Bright red, shiny hips follow a profuse blooming season. Long lived. To 8′ x 8′ if left unpruned. Regrowth on hard pruned shrubs in a season can be almost as big. Disease resistant, virus free and produced on its own roots. Light deer resistance. Photo credit: Dangergarden Loree Bohl.

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Rosa x ‘Bengal Fire’

Nothing says I love you like a single red rose and this single red rose is perfect. Large 4″ single deep red flowers with a hint of magenta appear continuously from May to frost. Easy, disease free rose with dark foliage that cups the intensely hued flowers. To 6′ x 6′ in a season. May be pruned in early spring to resize, increase density and blooming wood. Rapid rebloom all season. Great landscape rose. Very nice as a component in a border. Simple and clean and colorful. Full sun to light shade in rich, moisture retentive soil. Consistent summer water yields the best bloom but when established this tough rose can sail through a summer with very little water. Mostly deciduous. This, as all of our roses,  is produced on its own roots.

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Rosa x odorata ‘Mutabilis’

Butterfly Rose! One of the most popular roses for its multicolor effect and ease of culture. Single flowers open amber/cream and move to dark pink after several days. Great in combination with the maroon new foliage. Adaptable and will grow just about anywhere there is full sun. Rich soil sends this easy to grow plant soaring to 8′ x 8′ in just a few years. Judicious pruning will keep it in check. Rich, to average well drained soil Blooms continuously from May to frost. Best in warm sunny aspects. Disease resistant.

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Rubus spectabilis ‘Golden Ruby’

This golden leaved form of our native Salmon Berry is an exciting variation for wild areas. The brilliantly colored foliage sparkles with deep pink flowers in spring. In summer it produces salmon colored sweet, edible berries. To 7′ tall and spreading as wide as it would like. Full sun (with irrigation) to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Give this colonizing plant room to spread. It appreciates moist soil but is very tough when established. Deciduous- though it is a short period and the brilliant new leaves begin emerging in late winter.  Stream banks,  the back area of woodlands, wild areas. Moderate deer resistance. Increases by suckering stolons. Easy native to brighten wild woods. Oregon native plant.

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Sanguisorba hasukanensis

LOVE this perennial. In July- September it produces electric pink 2″ long fat fluffy tassel like flowers- they fade after a few days to light pink/white for a fine multicolor effect that lasts quite a long time. The pinnate leaves are rounded and handsome and all around this long lived, cold hardy perennial is of regal quality. North Korean collection. To 30″ tall in bloom by a clump expanding to several feet wide. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular summer irrigation. The leaves are edible and taste faintly (to me) of cucumber. Excellent perennial.

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Sanguisorba officinalis ‘Pink Tanna’

Beautiful summer blooming hardy perennial that fits nicely into the new meadow movement. Divided grass green pinnate leaves densely clothe the base of this clumping perennial. Above the foliage in June- August rise pink furry catkins like blooms on straight stems. The come in profusion and create a light repetitive texture that is ideal with such things as ornamental grasses and other spire perennials like Sidalcea (Checker Mallow). Spent flowers remain until autumn and change to a russet brown. In autumn the foliage turns yellow before disappearing entirely. Completely deciduous in winter. To 18″ tall and as wide in rich soil with regular summer water. Very adaptable to clay soils but requires more regular irrigation. Dried out clay is the worst thing to try and rehydrate. Pretty perennial. Butterfly heaven. Long lived perennial.

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Sanguisorba officinalis ‘Tanna’

Superb form of Burnet that is compact but supplies masses of deep maroon red lozenge shaped flowers on upright straight stems. The flowers appear from June to October and create a great hazy repetitive texture. Ideal in the front of a border or in a meadow with other plants that do not exceed its compact height. To 12″ tall and forming expanding clumps to several feet wide in time. Rich, moisture retentive soil in full sun is best. Very adaptable to heavy clay soils as long as there is regular summer irrigation. Wonderful combined with the grass Schizachyrium scoparium ‘The Blues’. Regular summer water. Blooms turn russet when they are spent but remain vertical. Leaves turn bright yellow in autumn before the whole plant disappears entirely for winter.

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Sanguisorba tenuifolium ‘Korean Snow’

Big, Big, late blooming perennial that is very easy to grow and incredibly showy in bloom. 2″ catkin-like white flowers foam 5′-6′ above the plant in August-October. Excellent cut flower, Full sun and rich to average soil that is moisture retentive. Great in the back of a border where it will tower and wave its lovely pure white flowers in the breeze. Full sun leads to much more vertical plants. Regular summer water. Forms spreading patches. Completely winter deciduous.

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Spiraea betulifolia var. lucida

Underused native Spiraea from the western United States and native in Oregon including the immediate Portland area.  Low mounding deciduous shrub to 2′ x 3′. This is the locally native form. Often the straight species is for sale- its from Asia and is 4 times the size of ours. Pink buds open to foamy white flat clusters of flowers appear in late spring. In autumn it turns amazingly vivid colors of red/orange/gold and it holds its color for weeks. One of the most drought tolerant of the genus requiring light summer water to very little. Full sun and rich soil. Spreads to form patches. Locally native and plentiful near the Columbia Gorge and throughout the mountains whose diminutive habit means that pruning is seldom necessary. Blooms on wood from the previous season. Long lived and an excellent landscape shrub. Birch Leaf Spiraea or glossy leaved Spiraea. Native in the Portland city limits. Oregon native plant.

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Spiraea thunbergii ‘Fujino Pinky’

This is a charming hardy, deciduous shrub with quite a few fine attributes. In late winter to early spring red flower buds line the arching fine stems and open to white/light pink. The effect is a classic apple blossom scheme. The fine leaves are thin and and a pleasant fresh green in summer. I think its finest hour is autumn when the whole shrub becomes a glowing ball of red/ orange/ pink. The chemical that causes the the pink in the flowers is most evident in the fall color. Tough rounded and then arching shrub of fine texture. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune directly AFTER blooming if necessary. Size is somewhat dependent on irrigation. To 4′ x  4′ in 5 years in rich to average soil with regular summer water to establish. Then just avoid severe aridity. Long lived, cold hardy plant that is best with a hard pruning every 6 or so years to refresh. Good for wild areas, not deer resistant but admirably adapted to dryness. Excellent performance in the Columbia Gorge and east of the Cascades. Mix with Spiraea betulifolia var. lucida for summer bloom but a simultaneous spectacular long show in fall. Native to Japan.

 

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