Acaena inermis ‘Purpurea’

Such a good good plant. The purple-foliaged New Zealand Burr covers the ground in pinnate dark purple foliage. Low spreading evergreen ground cover for full sun to part shade in rich, well drained, moisture retentive soils. Avoid compacted dry soils- it will die out. Instead provide an annual mulch of compost- put it right over the leaves and let the foliage grow up through it. This will give you a dense spectacular ground cover in scintillating purple. Excellent as an understory in containers as well. In summer sporadic 4″ stems support spiky maroon orbs- these are the flowers. New Zealand.

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Albizia julibrissin ‘Summer Chocolate’

Amazing form of Mimosa that seems to thrive in the Willamette Valley. Finely divided foliage is a remarkable maroon/black. The pale pink powderpuff flowers that appear just after the leaves and continue for two months are excellently contrasted by the leaves. A very wide spreading tree to 25′ tall and as wide in 10 years. Full, unobstructed sun and virtually any soil that drains well. It’s vitally important that you water this tree heavily upon planting and into its first autumn. It must be well established to sail through its first winter. I have 4 in my garden and I watered them very heavily for the first summer season and they have never looked back. Creates exotic, beautiful specimens in time.

 

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Anthriscus ‘Ravenswing’

Deeply colored foliage and clusters of white umbel flowers combine to give this easy to grow biennial an important place in the garden. The finely divided leaves are almost black but have a bluish hue on the surface that reflects the light in opalescent waves. The first year it produces only this gorgeous foliage. Combine with chartreuse/gold leaved perennials and/or shrubs for excellent contrast. In the second season the foliage extends and masses of pure white umbels wave to 3′ tall above the plant. Light and airy which is cool for a plant with deep, brooding foliage. Self sows prolifically and the seedlings are easy to spot, move, thin, dispatch. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, moisture-retentive soil with light but consistent summer moisture. Excellent in woodlands or sunny borders. It makes a surprisingly good cut flower as well. Umbels…these days its all about umbels. Winter deciduous.

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Arthropodium maculatum ‘Purpureum’

AKA Arthropodium maculatum ‘Candidum’ New Zealand Rock Lily. Intersting clump forming lily relative that has fine strappy leaves in a dense configuration that are dotted with brown over a madder red overlay. Wonderful little foliage plant for part shade in rich, moisture retentive soil. In summer masses of 4″ stems support clouds of tiny nodding white flowers. Fun. Rock gardens, the front of borders, massed together for a more profound effect. To about 10″ wide. Completely winter deciduous. Nice summer container plant.

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Beesia deltophylla

Still relatively new this extraordinary perennial has so many fantastic attributes it will become indispensable in our gardens. Glossy concave heart shaped leaves emerge tinted black before settling to a deep forest green. The dense foliage is seldom bothered by pests and appears to be slug/snail resistant. Throughout the growing season 2′ spikes emerge over the dome of dense foilage with small white flowers. The over effect is cool sophistication in the shade garden. Slowly expanding to 2′ wide. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular summer irrigation. Mix with Hosta, Hakenochloa, Epimedium. Semi-evergreen.

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Callistemon viridiflorus ‘Shamrock’

Our selection of a very compact, dense and tidy growing Mountain Bottlebrush. Moderately slow growing shrub to 5′ x 3′ in 7 years. In May-July 3″ acid green bottlebrush flowers decorate all the branch tips. A thrill for hummingbirds. In winter the small pointed deep green leaves take on dramatic maroon tints- great contrast with the white, cork-like bark. Very tidy compared to the species which can be somewhat wild and unkempt. If you don’t want that try ‘Shamrock’. It fits in small sites well and is adaptable to all types of soil, including heavy clay. Great cold hardiness- suffering no injury at 5ºF. Excellent landscape shrub or foundation plant. Tidy and dense. Moderate deer resistance.  Low water requirements.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Camellia sasanqua ‘French Vanilla’

A really cool winter blooming Camellia that has several surprises. The pure white single flowers that open from December to February are HUGE- up to 5″ across in full bloom. They have a boss of yellow stamens in the center that emit a light sweet scent. When blooming is over the new growth is the next surprise. Glossy deep black leaves emerge and fade slowly to deep green. Its a great foliage transition and gives the shrub extra depth. Large growing upright sasanqua to 8′ tall and 4′ wide in 7 years. Much wider with time. Great espalier subject with vigorous lithe growth. Sets tons of flower buds and if flowers are ruined by frost more will open in sequence. Full sun to part shade in rich, well drained soil. Light but consistent summer moisture. Very easy to grow shrub with spectacular flowers at a good time of the year. Fast growing to 1′-3′ per year when young. Evergreen.

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Coprosma x ‘Black Cloud’

This is a hardy shrub in a genus that is known for being decidedly tender.  A fantastic black leaved evergreen shrub from New Zealand which is an exciting hybrid. Small, glossy green leaves stained with black on handsomely patterned branches.  Full sun to light shade. Spreading habit is low when young eventually it grows upright to 4′ tall and 5′ wide with a distinctive and beautiful tiered branching pattern.  Insignificant small white flowers- they look like little translucent white worms- way more unobtrusive than it sounds.  This shrub has shocked us with its hardiness to cold. It survived temperatures in the single digits in a container and didn’t flinch. This is a wonderful foliage shrub that should be more popular. Excellent appearance year round. Drought tolerant. ‘Black Cloud’ Mirror Plant. Use as a small scale ground cover or first rate landscape plant. Very easy to grow. 

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Dahlia ‘Bednall’s Beauty’

We grow just a select few Dahlias now but over the decades we’ve been able to observe hardiness by cultivar. This is consistently one of the hardiest. And its a wonderful perennial. Finely divided foliage is dark, nearly black on a compact plant to 2′ x 2′ with stunning black/velvet red single flowers. These appear consistently from June to frost. Shorter stems lead to a smaller cut flower but it is still wonderful none-the-less. The intense deep flower color is a perfect match for the foliage yielding a dark tinted plant. Provide contrasting light to golden colored foliage for extra depth. Excellent border perennial for full sun and rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. This hardy perennial requires very little protection other than a layer of mulch in autumn. Even a layer of leaves will provide a modicum of cover. Emerges with truly warm weather in spring. Protect emerging plants from snails/slugs. Full grown plants seem less affected. Loved by pollinators and moderately deer resistant. Far from 100% but still one of the last they will munch.

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Disporum cantonense ‘Night Heron’

Amazing perennial that is a great release from the former Heronswood Nursery. A tall growing evergreen fairy bells that emerges in spring with new growth dyed distinctly black- stems and leaves. They eventually turn to a medium green in summer. White the new growth unfurls its bearing small green/white bell shaped flowers. The effect is sublime. To 4′ tall ( or taller) it rises up to a finely divided scape of leaves in an arching fan construction. Excellent perennial that may be cut back to the ground in late winter to showcase the dramatic new growth. Woodland conditions, rich, humusy soil with regular summer water. Great in containers. Resistant to slugs and snails. I have not tried this perennial in deer land so I’m not sure how it would fare. Please let us know if you have experience with that.

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Epimedium grandiflorum var. higoense ‘Bandit’

We love this little multidimensional barrenwort that pairs fresh green leaves outlined in black in spring while simultaneously producing clouds of star shaped crystal white flowers. A compact smaller growing plant to 10′ tall and with good care spreading to 18″ wide. The remarkable new growth morphs to solid fresh green in summer. Blooms March to May in part to full shade (really doesn’t like sun so don’t fudge it). Regular summer water. Rich, moisture retentive hummus rich soil. Add an annual application of compost and even a  handful of organic fertilizer in spring to increase vigor- give it a good life. Completely winter deciduous. Long lived perennial.

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Epimedium x grandiflorum ‘Pierre’s Purple’

A really good purple flowering barrenwort with new foliage that emerges deep purple and accompanies the mid-violet colored flowers that have spurs tipped in white. A really good effect on a sophisticated long lived perennial. To 1′ tall and 2′ wide in rich, moisture retentive soil. Add a layer of compost annually and water regularly through the dry summer months. Completely winter deciduous. One of the best purples that we’ve grown. Easy plat.

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Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’

Bold cold hardy bulb that we cherish for its rosettes of huge wide deep purple foliage as it emerges in spring/early summer. By the middle of the season stems extend from the middle of the plant with unique columns of dense pink/white flowers. On top is a hat of leaves. Reminds me of a garden form of Carmen Miranda. The resemblance is where we get the common name of Pineapple lily.  Give this big spreading perennial space. Following the flowers the wide, heavy leaves will turn more greenish and lay down. That means they will swamp any delicate neighbors nearby. At least 2′ of clearance on each side. Multiplies happily in rich, deep soil in full sun. Regular summer water restricts stress and keeps the leaves happily vertical. Long lived and hardy. South Africa.

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Euphorbia x ‘Purple Preference’

Excellent Euphorbia hybrid selected for deeply hued purple foliage that it pairs with early spring panicles of large chartreuse yellow flowers. Semi-shrubby evergreen perennial for RICH soil that drains quickly and light summer irrigation. The foliage goes through several hues before settling to deep green (purple to mustard to green). To 3′ tall and half as wide. Completely sterile hybrid that will not reseed or become a pest. Long season of bloom and interest. Appreciates the good conditions.

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Fuchsia ‘Insulinde’

Not the hardiest Fuchsia but by all means one of the showiest. This improved form of ‘Gartenmeister’ is taller  with longer brilliant orange red flowers. Tubular pendant flowers in groups to 3″ long. They appear in a massive and continuous display for months petering out around frost. To 30″ tall and very upright- just half as wide. The foliage is a distinct maroon/burgundy which sets off the hot colored flowers nicely. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Part shade to full sun (but not against a hot wall) with water. Incorporate a handful of all organic fertilizer at planting. To over winter this more tender than normal beauty plant deeply, mulch in autumn heavily, and even pile some dry leaves around the crown. It may return from the base if we have a mild winter (above 20ºF). Otherwise its a stellar container constituent. Hummingbirds.

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Geranium sessiliflorum ‘Red Select’

Very pretty cocoa brown leaves have fine hairs on them that give them a kind of metallic sheen. Everything about this plant is the same uniform cocoa color save for the dime sized white flowers which appear continuously as long as its warm and provide welcome contrast. Mounding evergreen plant to 6″ tall and 20″ wide. Full sun and rich,well drained soil with regular summer water. Takes less water in richer soil. A very pretty and durable New Zealand native Geranium. Not bothered by slugs and snails.

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Geranium x ‘Stanhoe’

Cute little spreading New Zealand Geranium with pewter brown leaves with  silver sheen and small off white/pink flowers all summer long. To 4″ tall but spreading to 11/2′ wide. Great in containers where the foliage provides contrast and the trailing stems clad in flowers arch over the edge of the pot. Very easy to grow and may self sow a bit. Easy to identify the seedlings to dispatch, transplant, or give away. Full sun to part shade and rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Not bothered by slugs and snails.

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Helleborus x ‘Black Diamond’ Winter Jewels ®

The darkest black flowers on a Hellebore that we have encountered. Jet black flowers have a sheen. Great in combination with the deep maroon/purple new foliage. To 2′ x 2′ blooming from January-April. Light, consistent summer water in part shade to shade. Completely deer resistant.

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Helleborus x ‘Ruby Wine’ Winter Jewels ®

We’ve fallen in love with this richly colored strain of Hellebores. Vivid and intense true wine red flowers are effective both up close and at a distance. Paired with the maroon new growth and you get a good looking total perennial. Hellebores bloom non-stop from February to April The large flowers of this strain do not fade with age. To 2′ x 2′ for part shade and rich, well composted soil. Light but consistent summer water.

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Jasminum officinale ‘Affine’

Vigorous and improved selection of cold hardy Poet’s Jasmine. with new growth that emerges maroon and profuse buds that are pink that open to highly fragrant 3/4″ white flowers. Huge floral display in June and then sporadically until frost on new growth. Deciduous vine that develops leaf tones of peach before the leaves drop. Huge vine that is suitable for a pergola or very large trellis. To 15’+ tall in 5 years. Rich to average well drained soil with light summer water which helps it re-bloom. Flower fragrance is most notable in the evening and morning. Very sweet. Mix with climbing roses. Prune AFTER flowering. Cold hardy.

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Lagerstroemia indica ‘Black Diamond Red’®

Striking crape myrtle with jet BLACK foliage that would be cool all by itself. The real kicker is intense true red flowers that smolder with the leaves. A naturally and reliably early blooming almost fastigiate tree. To 9′ tall but just 3′ wide in 7 years. Full hot sun and rich soil with regular summer irrigation for the best results. So far it has been completely mildew free as well. Imagine the late summer combinations? Blooms first appear in early August in urban areas- later in cooler hinterlands. If it never bloomed it would be a cool thing but that red. Wow. Fall color is non-existent.

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Leptinella squalida ‘Platt’s Black’

Its important that a ground cover be successful. They are meant after all to cover the ground, block weeds, discourage erosion, provide a uniform look. After trying many ground covers and the famed “squashables” as we call them (plants don’t like to be stepped on- that why we play football on grass and not Corsican Mint). This is a vigorous evergreen (black) dense growing plant that literally crowds out the competition rather than obscuring it. Tiny, ferny foliage takes on dramatic black tones when mature or the lightest bit stressed. It prefers non-compacted loose friable soil to roam with regular summer water. Full sun creates the darkest foliage and creates the densest plant. If planting in between pavers know that repeat stepping on the stones will compact the soil around them- not many plants especially ground covers like this. To combat this spread a layer of compost right over the plant in early spring. it will quickly grow through it and love the nutrients and oxygen in the soil that it provides. Little inconspicuous button flowers are easy to miss. To 1j/2″ tall and several feet wide.

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Leptospermum scoparium ‘Washington Park’

Manuka. This is a wonderful very upright wispy evergreen shrub with tiny leaves that turn maroon in winter and masses of white flowers in early summer. Flowers are born on wood from the previous season and are much larger than the foliage. The effect in early summer is a shrub clad in snow. To 8′ tall x 4′ wide in 5 years. Full sun and a protected position, such as against a south facing wall. This form is from the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle where it has thrived for many years. A selection made from high elevation inland New Zealand. Grows very fast w/ light summer water. Excellent fine textured plant. Moderate deer resistance. Cold hardy to a little below 10ºF- it has been damaged but recovered from lower temperatures. Very easy to grow wild looking plant. Drought adapted when established.

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Loropetalum chinense var rubrum ‘Zhuzhuo Fuchsia’

A large shrub/ small tree that is one of the best adapted fringe flowers for our climate. New growth is deep maroon settling later on to a deep maroon green. In spring a massive display of hot pink frilly threadlike flowers covers the whole framework. Flowers appear sporadically after that. Evergreen (loses some leaves below 10ºF- but regains foliage quickly in spring.). Moderately fast growing to 9′ x 8 ‘ in 7 years. Full sun to part shade in rich, well drained soil with average summer water. Takes dry conditions when established- its important to water it well during establishment. This immediately improves cold hardiness when young. Perfectly hardy as an established shrub. Wonderful arching stems support tiered graceful foliage.

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Loropetalum chinense var. rubrum ‘Pippa’s Red’

Large growing cold hardy shrub/tree that we love for its deep purple/black foliage and masses of true red fringe flowers in spring. Fast growing shrub to 8′ x 6′ in 7 years. The flowers that appear en masse in spring occur sporadically at any time of the year. As far as we can tell this is the darkest foliage on a very cold hardy shrub. Loropetalums are somewhat tender when young but gain complete hardiness in a season or two. Loses some leaves in exposed locations below about 10ºF. Makes a great small tree in (a long) time. Very graceful the way the pointed leaves alternate on the arching stems. Worth growing for foliage alone. Full sun to part shade in a warm position. Regular summer water rapidly increases the growth rate. Otherwise once established requires only light summer irrigation. One of the most popular landscape shrubs in the world if you include China where it is native and has been grown ornamentally for eons. Prune AFTER flowering if needed.

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Mahonia aquifolium

Oregon Grape, our ubiquitous state flower. This evergreen shrub can be found almost anywhere aside from the immediate coast to high Cascades west of the mountains. Its native from B.C. to Southern California. Variable shrub to on average 5′ tall and suckering as wide. In rich, happy conditions it will soar to 8′ or more and in more impoverished conditions it makes its life as a spreading low plant. In late February-April the top of the plant erupts in golden yellow incredibly fragrant flowers that are one of the first joys of spring. By late summer this flowers have transformed into clusters of dusty blue incredibly sour fruits. Often employed in the toughest situations where its performance is some what rough. It thrives in cultivation with light, consistent summer moisture. Tolerates heavy clay soils and summer drought. The pinnate leaves often take on purple/maroon tints in winter. Ours are cuttings native to our wholesale nursery site. So its a local plant. Full sun to part shade to quite a bit of shade at the expense of blooming and a lankier outline. Excellent deer resistance when established. Oregon native plant.

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Mahonia nervosa var. mendocinoensis

Rare but excellent form of Cascades Mahonia that is actually found only in the redwoods of N. California to southern Oregon. A TALL upright growing shrub with thick trunks to 9′  eventually. It forms a clump of stems and can increase by suckering closely to the main clump and sending up new stems. Handsome foliage- pinnate dark green leaves to 1′ + long.  In winter the whole shrub takes on great plum purple tones. In mid-spring trailing clusters of yellow flowers are followed by blue berries. Moderately slow growing evergreen shrub for part shade to dense shade. Established plants take dust dry conditions in shade. Accepts regular summer water as well- in well drained soil that is not compacted. Mulch each year with a coarse bark. Easy to grow. Appearance is very much like the M. x media hybrids. New growth emerges red. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Melianthus major ‘Purple Haze’

Nice selection of Honey Bush that shares tints of purple predominantly when new leaves are unfurling. The enormous blue/lavender serrated leaves are amazing. Lower growing than either the species or ‘Antonow’s Blue’. To 4′ tall (usually shorter) by at least 6′ wide. Red flowers are produced on the black scape that can follow mild winters. Technically a subshrub as it can freeze to the ground and fully recover from the root in a single season. IF it has been well established in its first season. For that reason we only sell Melianthus in 2 gallon sizes. A larger plant establishes faster and has more mass going into winter. Plant in a protected location- against a wall or with light overstory protection. Mulch for the first winter. Freezes to the ground at prolonged temperatures below about 20ºF. Re-sprouts in mid-late spring. Water and fertilize to speed the recovery. South Africa.

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Monardella macrantha ‘Marian Sampson’

Shockingly showy little perennial wildflower that display relatively huge brilliant red tubular flowers from a somewhat demure plant. Deep green/maroon foliage is aromatic but gives no hint at the ultimate showiness of the flowers. Blooms appear continuously from late spring to autumn. Very well drained soil of moderate fertility in full sun. Light summer water but occasional deep soaks spurs flowers. Hummingbirds actually get down to ground level for this 3″ tall by 14″ wide matt forming perennial. Good drainage aids in cold hardiness for this striking California native wildflower. Exceptional and long blooming in containers.

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Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Purpureus’

Remarkable form of the holly leaf tea olive with new growth that emerges a deep purple black. It settles to dark green in summer on a large growing shrub to 8′ x 8′ in 7 years. Full sun to very light shade in all soils that drain well. Very drought adapted when established. Mature shrubs bear masses of tiny white flowers in the leaf axils in October-November that cast a sweet perfume. Excellent cold hardiness. This is one of the few broad leaf evergreens that is perfectly hardy to the subfreezing wind of the gorge. Troutdale, this shrubs for you. Great hedge as well as specimen. Flowers occur on wood from the previous year- prune in winter after flowering.

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Phormium tenax ‘Atropurpureum’

The most commonly seen New Zealand Flax in our climate and arguably one of the most hardy to cold. Deep maroon/purple evergreen foliage in a large clump to 5′ x 5′ ultimately in a hot position and full sun in rich, well drained soil. Regular summer water increases the growth rate which in turn establishes the plant more thoroughly. The more established the Flax the more vigorously it returns if it gets hit by cold. If it does, try not to cut the whole thing to the ground but leave as many viable leaves as possible for food to aid in the recovery. Great plant for hot hellstrips and containers. Borders. etc. Following mild winters (above 20ºF) it may send up 6′ spikes with duckbill shaped yellow flowers in summer. Thrives at the Oregon Coast where it seldom is ever bothered by cold and where it absorbs blasting salt laden winds happily. High deer resistance.

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Phormium tenax ‘Portland Night’

We selected this incredibly dark foliaged New Zealand Flax from a huge seed batch. It was the darkest maroon/black and exhibited great vigor. To 3′ x 3′ in rich, well drained soil with light but consistent summer moisture. Soak once every two weeks once established. Full sun to light shade in a somewhat protected location. When established it is capable of freezing back in extreme winters and recovering fully by early summer. Following mild winters (above 20ºF) 6′ spikes may appear with tubular yellow flowers on a much branched inflorescence. If in containers move to a freeze free location in the event of an arctic blast (about once every four years). Arching stems are graceful. High deer resistance. Great performance on the Oregon Coast. Evergreen.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Pittosporum divaricatum

Unless you look REALLY REALLY closely you would never even think this was a Pittosporum, let alone even in that family. But life was tough in alpine New Zealand and this baby would have none of the grazing by huge Moa Birds. So the twiggy, zig zaggy stems evolved (the official term is divarication). The tiny, tiny leaves are serrated if you look closely (you might even take out glass to amplify the details). Tiny white flowers line the stem and mostly go unnoticed in spring. What it does provide is a very architectural compact shrub with stunning black stems in winter that change to ashy grey in summer. Perfectly hardy to cold down to below 5ºF. Full sun and average to enriched soil with little summer water once established. Groovy, somewhat rare shrub for excellent effects. To 6′ x 3′ in 8 years. Moderate deer resistance. Great structural shrub for containers.

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Primula ‘Guinevere’

Good reliable perennial Primrose with dark maroon leaves and stems in great contrast to the simple lavender pink flowers. A nice yellow eye adorns the center of each flowers. Blooms February to early May. Low growing form that makes colonies over time in rich, moisture retentive soil with regular water. Must have regular summer water to survive the drought season and this one will without huge amounts of effort. Under shrubs in woodland glens. Easy perennial.

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Rhaphiolepis umbellata ‘Blueberry Muffin’

Excellent release from the JC Raulston Arboretum in Raliegh, NC. This dense and rounded shrub is useful for its size- 3′ x 3′ in 7 years- or longer. But it has many other fine points. The leaves are thinner than normal with this species which is native to Japan. It is very very black spot resistant and the leathery glossy leaves turn from olive green/gray in summer to amazing stains of maroon and purple with cooler temperatures. New growth is light beige and coated in furry indumentum before becoming glossy.  A fascinating and beautiful display. White flowers appear in May and are followed by fairly showy blue berries. Extremely drought tolerant and tolerant of high heat. Excellent on south facing walls or exposed urban situations with reflected heat. Handsome at all times and very easy to grow. Grows about 4″ per year. Nice measured growth that forms a rounded upright shrub. Excellent companion for other drought adapted shrubs-landscapes. It also accepts regular irrigation in summer- a useful adaptation for an already useful shrub. Full sun to part shade.

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Rosa ‘Lady Hillingdon’

Everyone needs at least one fluffy rose in their garden and this one deserves a place. A true tea rose introduced in 1910 it is also very cold hardy for this class.  Very double flowers emerge orange sherbet and age from the outside in to a soft pastel apricot- as per this class the petals are heavily scrolled. The nodding blossoms (a hallmark of a true tea rose) are somewhat loose with the powerful fragrance of dried black tea. Sweet and inviting. New foliage is maroon and transitions to deep glossy green. This is a wonderful backdrop to the ‘egg yolk’ colored flowers that virtually glow. Do not hard prune. Instead limit pruning to removing spent wood and the previous years spent blossoms. Blooms repeatedly from June to September- removing spent flowers encourages more. Full sun to part shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water for best bloom. Roses are heavy feeders and this one is no different. Begin its life with a large amendment of organic fertilizer to ensure a large and vigorous root system. Top dress with Alfalfa Meal in March. To 5′ on average and about 1/2 as wide.  For diligent gardeners it may be trained as a climber. Joke: This rose was often grown against warm walls in colder climates. Hence, the phrase: ‘Lady Hillingdon’ she’s bad in a bed but great against a wall. HARR! Thank you Marcella Garcia-Moore for this excellent rose. Available Spring 2019.

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Rosa glauca

The invaluable red or purple leaved rose. Beautiful foliage has hints of blue and with the single pink flowers in May/June its sublime. These are followed by clusters of showy orange hips. To 7′ x 7′ very quickly in full sun and well drained soil of average to rich fertility. Avoid standing water in winter. Very drought tolerant and easy to grow rose with a minimum of thorns. Large arching habit makes it a natural summer scaffold for smaller Clematis. Long lived, cold hardy. Orange fall color.

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Rosa x odorata ‘Mutabilis’

Butterfly Rose! One of the most popular roses for its multicolor effect and ease of culture. Single flowers open amber/cream and move to dark pink after several days. Great in combination with the maroon new foliage. Adaptable and will grow just about anywhere there is full sun. Rich soil sends this easy to grow plant soaring to 8′ x 8′ in just a few years. Judicious pruning will keep it in check. Rich, to average well drained soil Blooms continuously from May to frost. Best in warm sunny aspects. Disease resistant.

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Sempervivum ‘Reinhard’

A really fun and rightfully famous cultivar. Celery green leaves are tipped in black. Very dramatic and the kind of contrast that makes a plant stand out. Rosettes are 4″ across and offsets are produced constantly. Very pretty dense small scale ground cover. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Deals with drought by shrinking. They rehydrate with the first rains. They look better and grow faster with water. Excellent in containers, crevice gardens, rock gardens, rock walls, troughs. I’ve never seen this variety bloom but I assume the flowers would be red or white…doesn’t matter thats not the point. Detach babies and give to neighbors with the official name. Increases its specialness, impresses the neighbor. This would be a good variety for a living wall.

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Sempervivum ‘Virgil Ford’

Collectively this handsome Hens and chicks is one of our favorites. Soft pink to lavender and tipped with purple in cold weather. Nice. Large rosettes to 5″ across when happy. Boisterous multiplier and forming large colonies quickly. Rich, well drained soil with regular water to keep up appearances. Containers, rock walls, rock gardens, as a small scale weed smothering ground cover. Full sun to light shade. Even dry shade when established. Detach the babies and give them to a friend. Or chuck them at a Trump voter. Pretty plant. High deer resistance.

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Trillium kurabayashii

One of Oregon’s greatest wildflowers. This native of the Siskiyous and the SW part of the state makes an outstanding garden plant. Ours are divisions from well marked leaves and flowers with a deep maroon/black hue. To 18″ tall in bloom it responds readily to rich, humus filled soil with regular summer water. In very dry conditions it will go happily summer dormant. And it usually does anyway by the end of the hot season. The black and green leaves are dramatic but a  great collar to the tall upright dark flowers. Blooms appear in Portland in April/May and last for weeks. Part shade to shade- avoid blasting hot sun- it will grow in sun but go dormant very quickly. Roots very deep into the ground- difficult to move once established so pick its home carefully. Multiplies into a substantial patch with good care. One of our favorite native wildflowers. Limited quantities. Oregon native plant.

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