Cold hardy and very showy  Hebe that is an excellent small scale ground cover. To just inches high it expands over time to up to 4′ wide. The gray evergreen foliage is handsome year round. In early summer the tips of the plant are ensconced in violet- blue colored flowers. This showy display draws pollinators and butterflies. One of the showiest of the very cold hardy varieties. Takes temperatures below 10ºF with no damage. Excellent on slopes. Expanding branches can root where they touch the ground, making this spreader excellent for erosion control. It also grows with such density to block weeds. Very easy to grow. Mix with perennials and in-between shrubs in full sun to very light shade. Light CONSISTENT summer irrigation. The small gray leaves line the black stems for more exquisite detail. Excellent at the top of a wall where it will trail and follow the contours exactly. Moderate deer resistance.

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Everything about this form of hardy flowering maple is identical  to the species except the molten red flowers with deeper veins shot through. The 2″ pendant flowers appear from May to October on a large growing sub-shrub. To 6′ in a single season It makes rapid growth as temperature rise above 70ºF. Full sun, in a protected location in rich soil with regular summer irrigation. Abutilons look absolutely horrific in spring even after a normal winter. Expect this. The solution is to water, water, water especially as the temperatures rise. It blooms on new wood and flowers are continuous as the shrub grows. Mostly deciduous but it can be evergreen at the coast or in protected places in mild winters. Loved  by hummingbirds who are lured by the lurid red flowers filled with nectar. Cut back by 1/2 after all danger of frost has passed. Supply a handful of all organic fertilizer and water faithfully. Excellent performance at the Oregon coast. Inland it is best with the protection of a shrub covering its roots so that the soil does not freeze. In this situations it can live even thrive for many many years. Mulch with compost. Native to the mountains of Brazil. Root hardy to about 10ºF. Long lithe stems can be woven through a fence or a lattice.

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Oxalis oregana ‘White Flower Form’

There are quite a few selection off Redwood Sorrel or Oregon sorrel. This is the most common light green leaved form that you see carpeting shady dells and tree rootwells in the deepest shade. To 8″ tall and spreading vigorously by underground stolons. Clear white flowers in mid to late spring. Edible. Very simple plant to grow in part shade to shade. It will even thrive on an open north exposure. The soft foliage is semi-evergreen and has a great rebirth in spring. Not bothered by pests or deer. Spreads to several feet wide in rich soil high in humus. Do not plant with smaller delicate neighbors this plant will easily swamp them. Avoid full sun and compacted soils. Established plants can get by the summer with minimal to no irrigation. Oregon native plant.

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We’ve been attempting to hybridize Grevilleas specifically, and that has proven to be difficult. What I rely on then are open pollinated hybrids – all Grevillea species can cross, pollinated by European honeybees in my garden they almost all set seed.  This is seed from a hybrid between Grevillea victorae x  Grevillea juniperina ‘Gold’. I sowed a bunch of seed and this seedling stands out as superior to the other seedlings and to many other Grevilleas that we grow. This is an upright growing and then spending evergreen shrub with distinctive small grass green wedge shaped leaves. The flowers are very large for a hybrid and the perianth is a soft citrus pastel orange. The style or pollen presenter begins life after opening with a red/melon color as it ages the style changes to light yellow from the tip down. The base of the style nearest the perianth remains dark melon red. Very heavy blooming selection. Flowers appear January-July and on older plants year round. The large clusters of un opened buds are shaded light pink before maturing.  Upright growing then spreading laterally with age. To 4′ tall and 6′ wide. All Grevilleas are a beacon to Hummingbirds and all birds as is this cultivar.  Full sun in average, un-amended soil. Dig a very large hole and water weekly until you see good new growth then taper to once a month. I’m very proud to offer this seedling, it is a vast improvement on other Grevilleas with similar size flowers- this one beats them all. Best in a warm, protected location.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Tan bark oak or Tan Oak is native to the SW corner of Oregon south into the mountains of southern Calfiornia. The large convex leaves emerge clad in gray fur as this wears off it reveals a mature deep green with an underside of silver. Moderately fast growing evergreen tree to 45′ tall x 25′ wide in 30  years. Grows on average 2′-4′ per year when young. This close relative of Oaks produces acorns that are light tan and born out of an indumentum covered prickly cup. In Oregon this tree mostly of mountains can be found most extensively from Douglas and Coos County south to the coastal border. It is found in the higher elevations of the mountains of northern California where quite a bit of heavy wet snow occurs. This tree will bend in snow and ice and it will not break. Conical and spreading crown. Tan Oak which was harvested in the 19th and early 20th century for the collection of commercial tannins. Full sun, it grows well but is slower and a bit spindly as an understory tree. The furrowed bark is dark brown to black. Its range is almost the same in Oregon as Canyon live oak (Quercus chrysolepis) and cold hardiness is equivalent too, hardy just below 0ºF. Wonderful, stately, native evergreen shade tree. Ours are raised from acorns collected at the northern extent of its range in Douglas County.  Oregon native plant.

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Hebe pimelioides ‘Quicksilver’

Fascinating New Zealand Hebe that is native to higher montane areas and is therefore very hardy to cold. Many arch black stems cradle rows of symmetrical small gray foliage. The color effect is more machine than plant and this arching shrub gains density by shearing the tips after flowering has ended in June. 2″ spikes support rows of violet blue flowers that fade to white in the oldest blooms. This shrub is best in containers or new gardens. It tends not to age well after 5 or so it begins to look unkempt. You can stave this off with pruning- prune just under the base of the lowest flower spike in July. Excellent new garden or rock garden plant for fine silvery texture and contrast with black stems. It truly shine in winter containers where it looks its best. To 14″ tall x 16″ wide forming somewhat of an anvil shape. Consistent summer water during hot spells. Cold hardy to the single digits.

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This is a relatively cold hardy and spectacular bottlebrush. Very upright growth on a vertical growing plant with distinctly blue leaves. In late spring soft yellow thick bottle brush flowers appear in a massive display. Hummingbirds and people come running. The glowing flower color set against a blue backdrop is sublime. Full sun (no shade, don’t even try) in a warm, protected location such as a south facing wall or fence. Moderately fast growing in the ground to 12′ tall and 4′ wide in 7 years. It can suffer considerable damage in our coldest winters, but established plants have recovered from temperatures below 10ºF. Blooms on wood from the previous year. Prune if needed after blooming has ended. Rows of button shaped woody seed capsule follow and persist for several years. Spectacular and easy at the coast. Aromatic foliage has some deer resistance. Protect containerized plants from temperatures below 20ºF. Blooms well in a container. Tasmania. Water to establish then occasionally in summer. Avoid strong subfreezing wind.

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The blue flowers of the common and loved herb rosemary rivals that of Ceanothus and Lithodora. That is on certain varieties. Bloom typically begins in December and peaks in early spring continuing until late spring on the best varieties. This is the best variety for blue flowers. The obvious Salvia flowers on ‘Mozart’ are thick on the stems and are entirely dark blue- no interior dots of white or white splotches. Full sun and water to establish in average soil. Extremely drought adapted when established. This strongly arching shrub goes up to about 30″ and spreads to 4′ wide. Hillsides, the top of rock walls, containers subjected to reflected heat. Pork roast. Very good culinary use/taste for this plant. Hardy to about 5ºF. Good drainage improves cold hardiness. Tolerates the hottest places with no stress. Aromatic waxy resin will attach to your fingers. Blooms on wood from the previous season. Prune or harvest when needed after blooming has ended. Some deer resistance. Extraordinarily drought adapted. Great performance at the Oregon coast.

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The O’Byrnes gave us this strain of the variegated form of Helleborus x sternii. Inheriting cold tolerance from H. corsica and nifty, thick palmate leaves from the more tender H. lividus .The result is a tough plant with green cupped flowers stained on the outside of the bell. The flowers remain effective for several months. Not quite as long as the straight H. x sternii, but a relatively long time. A shrubby species with large evergreen leaves. They are heavily speckled with cream dots with an underside to the leaves and the stems tinted pink. The palmate leaves become large and arching. Full sun with more frequent irrigation to full  shade with less. To 2′ x 2′. Deer and possibly rabbit resistant. The rough leaves resist weather. Site as you would for a small shrub. It is elegant with other woodlanders or can be grown with drought tolerant to low water plants even in full sun. Flower bend over enshrouded in a cup shape that protects the pollen from rain and the vagaries of winter weather.  Blooms January with flowers effective for three months. Great, sophisticated but tough plant for rural areas. May be afflicted with aphids in late spring. Hose those off or do not look closely.

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Ceanothus gloriosus ‘Anchor Bay’

A very good looking mounded, evergreen shrub that is best appreciated in milder gardens. In colder gardens provide a warm protected site. The small holly-like leaves are mat green and good looking year round. This moderately fast growing shrub at first spreads out and then with time mounds up. To 30″ tall by 4′ wide in 6 years. Dense growth suppresses weeds. In Apri/May for 3 weeks button shaped flower cluster are pale sky blue and appear on wood from the previous year. Prune, if needed after bloom has ended. This is seldom necessary. Consistent summer water for the first season then none in subsequent years. Excellent adaptation to the Oregon coast.  Cold hardy to 8º-10ºF briefly. Very good performance in hot sunny hell strips. Accepts part shade (at the expense of bloom) and poor soils. Somewhat formal in appearance it avoids the brush pile look with dense, closely layered leaves. Not as palatable to deer. Good appearance year round.

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