Stellar passion vine with distinctly purple tepals and deep black to blue on the interior of the flower. Vigorous vine for a protected location in full sun. To 12′ in a season and blooming continuously from June to October. Attaches itself by winding tendrils. The flowers appear on new wood, as the vine grows it produces new flowers.  Average to rich soil with REGULAR irrigation during the first season and then occasionally. Passafloras must be well established going into their first winter. In half of the winters (below 20ºF) it can freeze to the ground. It will then rapidly break from the base when truly warm weather arrives.  Mulch heavily the first winter, Place on a trellis against  warm, sunny wall for the best performance. The intricate and beautiful flowers are about 4″ across. Sometimes sets inedible fruit. Passion vines are loved by everybody but especially children. The toy-like flowers enchant everybody. Sweetly fragrant flowers up close. Loved by hummingbirds.  One of the best hybrid Pnassafloras for our gardens. Moderate deer resistance

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: ,


A very mysterious Gardenia that I got from the east coast and whose flowers are ENORMOUS and powerfully fragrant. Everything about this hardy Gardenia is big. The leaves are 5″x 3″ and are forest green and delightfully glossy. A moderately fast growing evergreen shrub to 6′ x 6′. Full sun but best in dappled shade in a protected location. Regular, consistent water is crucial. Gardenias like heat and water. Poorly irrigated plants will show yellow leaves on the interior of the plant before wilting. This is especially important since we’ve had consecutive dry springs and most likely you will need to water this plant beginning in April. Rich soil with regular water. Protect from subfreezing wind, and plant in rich soil with ample compost. Apply a handful of all organic fertilizer in early summer. The enormous flowers begin i July and continue to October. The only information I can find on this cold hardy cultivar is that it is particularly resistant to pests. Since Gardenias in our climate aren’t really pest magnets this is moot, but good to know. Spectacular flowers are 5″ across and semi-double. Excellent for corsages and even for floating in a bowl, one flower will perfume a wide area. It is crucially important that this shrub be well established going into winter otherwise its hardiness to cold will be compromised.  Limited quantities.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Obscure but exceedingly handsome and reliable shrub for hedges, specimens, eventually a small tree. Rounded leaves are good looking year round and especially when they first emerge brilliant salmon red before settling to dark green. This is the most showy display on this plant and it lasts for weeks. In mid-late summer small pendant white/cream flowers are nestled among the leaves, you really have to look to see them. Clean evergreen whose foliage is never marred by fungus or cold. Full sun to high overhead shade. To 8′-10′ tall and about half as wide. With great age and no pruning it can achieve small tree status and it forms attractive cloud like crowns of foliage. As a hedge  it excels. Plant 2 gallon plants on 3′ centers and mulch. Irrigate about once a week until you see good new growth. Established plants are very tolerant of dry conditions. Theaceae- Camellia family. Excellent cold hardiness to 0ºF, tolerate some subfreezing wind. Excellent companion plant for Rhododendrons, Pieris, Illicium. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. Native to Japan.  Good looking tough plant. Light deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Wonderful dwarf/very small Mountain Yew Pine. To just 2′ tall forming a very dense plant to 3′ wide in 10 years. Late in the summer and autumn it pushes beautiful red stained growth that persists through winter. This small formal looking plant has deep green fine, yew like foliage the remainder of the year. Adaptable conifer that takes clay soils as well as sand. Occasional deep watering not only improves appearance it guarantees that the late summer and autumn color change to red is more dramatic. Full sun to very light shade (with a slightly more open habit). Tiny green pillar shaped flowers can turn into red berries. Very easy to grow for a formal, clean or modern aesthetic. The dense growth is a great fine texture that mixes brilliantly with smaller ornamental grasses and other small conifers. Hybrid between two southern hemisphere Podocarpus. Does not require pruning or maintenance of any kind. Tiny needles are but 4mm long. CUTE. Long lived. Light deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


(California) Coffee Berry. Greg collected the berries/seed from this evergreen shrubby species in southwestern Oregon. In Josephine county it is a common dry shade understory component of both the forest and in open stands in chaparral. A light and gaunt  evergreen with slightly glossy convex leaves that hang on the tips of the gray branches. In spring/ summer tiny green flowers morph into the familiar berries. They start green move to red and arrive at black/brown. To 6′ tall x 6′ wide on average. Growth in rich soil is much more verdant and dense. In dry shade, its natural haunt, it assumes its most common form. Birds will spread this tough shrub that is ideal for wild scaping, xeric landscaping, rural areas. Perhaps its most wonderful characteristic is that it is completely deer resistant Leaves are glossy on top and blue/gray on the reverse and persist for 3-5 years. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in average to slightly enriched soil. Water to establish, or ideally plant in fall then natural rainfall alone. It will tolerate quite a bit of shade as well as root competition but not low shade, high overstay shade is better. . Informal shrub- good year round appearance. Extreme drought adaptation when established. In habitat this shrub is found with Arctostaphylos canescens, viscida, and Rhododendron occidentale and macrophyllum. Overstory is Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, Pseudotsuga, Pinus attentuata, Umbellularia californica. Quercus sp.  Cold hardy. Great for wildlife. Seed grown., Oregon native plant

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


We selected this seedling long ago for its vigor, it was culled from a batch of 50 as one of the best and it is. ‘Foxy Red’ is a mounding, low growing shrub that spreads. To 3′ tall x 8′ wide it produces a nearly year round parade of tomato red flowers. The  elongated superior foliage is olive green on the upper surface and gray below and comes to sharp point. Fast growing in full sun to light shade. Average unimproved soils are ideal, dig a large hole and soften the soil on the outer edges.  Water faithfully, once a week until good new growth commences then water less- once every two weeks/month depending on aridity. Nice looking winter blooming shrub that is ideal planted above rock walls where it can cascade down. Loved by hummingbirds, especially wintering Anna’s who see an out of season nectar source as gold. Mulch after planting- coarse bark, chips, gravel…. Established plants take summer drought without supplemental irrigation. Should be deer resistant. At some point we’ll test it for their consumption. Really nice looking shrub both in foliage and bright flower. May be pruned at any time of the year. Avoid strong subfreezing east wind. Protected site- south or west facing.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Grevilleas are interesting in that almost all species will cross. And you can end up with some really weird shit. In this instance I selected  this mounding evergreen shrub for the vividness of its orange flowers and superior cold hardiness from about 50 others. This cross between G. victorae and G. juniperina has thicker leaves than most cultivars (and seedlings) and that translates directly to improved cold hardiness and they end in a sharp tip. This variety has weathered 10ºF so far and could be hardier.  Larger, vivid orange flowers with a style stained melon red that quickly matches the orange of the perianth. (Pouch like petals that reflex when open). To 3′ tall x 8′ wide in 5 years. Full sun to very light shade in average to poor soil. Water weekly after planting and then as growth increases limit it to once a month- a deep soak. Blooms almost continually with a crescendo in late winter/early spring. Loved by hummingbirds, European honeybees, and native hover flies. Easy to grow. Mulch after planting. Its important that Grevilleas become well established by their first winter- this immediately increases cold hardiness. Once established its fairly care free except for occasional pruning. Established shrubs can go through summer without any supplemental water. Fun to grow shrub. Excellent at the Oregon coast, tolerates sandy substrates with additional water. Not bothered by deer. Elk? I have no idea- they will at least step on it so protect. Grevilleas all require good air circulation. Avoid plants that flop or lay on them- not only will it block the sun  it can even encourage rot. Site your Grevilleas where they are open and the wind can blow them dry.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
 |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Abutilon (Callianthe) ‘Nectarine’

One of our very finest Flowering Maple selections. Relatively large pendulous flowers are soft citrus yellow/orange with darker red veining. As this variety blooms out the flowers expand and the petals reflex upward, a very charming look. Vigorous and surprisingly cold hardy Abutilon. To 4′ x 4′ in a season. Rich soil that drains with REGULAR H20. During the growing season Flowering maples very much appreciate at least one application of all purpose organic fertilizer to enhance vigor and blooming. Easy to grow in containers where it will likely perform as a tender annual. In the ground it is different. By the end of winter the plant will look absolutely horrible sticks and maybe a few pieces of tattered dead leaves. The secret to the spring resurrection  is to water heavily and consistently until you see new growth. Then you can let the soil dry between irrigation. Loved by Hummingbirds and birds in general.  Grows very fast in the correct conditions. Blooms June to October.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8b 20º to 15ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: ,


Teucrium aroanum

Low ground cover Germander that is at home in hot sunny aspects in well drained conditions. The fine gray foliage rises to 5″ tall and forms a spreading plant.  Beginning in early summer and extending to fall soft purple to lavender clusters of flowers cover the surface of the plant. Though small this plant is a huge hit with pollinators. Full, hot sun and light summer water to establish. Not a fan of heavy soils and sodden conditions  In the wild this plant is primarily a resident of rocky sites and hillsides of the Mediterranean. This ever gray perennial is good looking in winter. Foliage is aromatic and has fruity tints to the fragrance. Mix with other smaller rock garden plants or develop a small area that acts as a groundcover. Loathes shade. Good container or trough plant. Grows up to 18″ wide in several years. Pollinator masterpiece. Moderate deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


One of the boldest species of lily turf that is as tough and adaptable as the rest of the genus. Wide leaves (for this genus) measure about 1″ wide and form rosettes that are staunchly evergreen. The initial rosette measures about 1′ across, in time it increases by stolons as well as enlarging clumps. This species is native to SW Asia and is surprisingly cold hardy.  Great year round appearance of foliage. In late summer 2′  thin spikes  rise above the leaves and displays soft mauve flowers for several weeks. An added vertical element that is subtle but very pretty. Part shade to shade, avoid hot dry sites. Rich soil and regular irrigation speeds growth and establishment. Adaptable to dry shade when established. Great in year round containers- I have yet to see it blemished by winter weather. Easy to grow, long lived perennial that is pretty and useful. Not bothered by deer- unsure about rabbits but I suspect they would love it. This Liriope has the widest leaves. Clumping. Consistent summer irrigation for the best appearance. Pronounced Leer-EYE- oh-pee.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6b 0º to -5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: