This is a wonderful compact and shorter growing golden rod that we found from seed. To just 1′ tall  and spreading to form a colony this smaller version fits in tighter places. The large conical flowers are erect at the top of the plant. An excellent version of one of the best pollinator perennials for late summer and early autumn. Average soil with light water to establish. Occasional water after that speeds growth. Mix with other late season native perennials such as Douglas and Halls aster. Winter deciduous and the stems become semi woody and can be left to supply seeds for birds throughout winter. The woody stems can be removed in early spring. This well sized and showy perennial is not only climate adapted its a very long lived perennial. Adaptable to heavy clay soils and drought. Adorable native perennial. To 3′ wide in time. Oregon native plant.

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This seedling Mock Orange appeared in our nursery rooted right into our gravel substrate. It was either a seedling of a few Philadelphus from eastern Oregon that we raised  a several years ago or it is a seedling of a naturally occurring plant about 50 meters away on the forest margin of our wholesale nursery. Either way its an astonishing shrub in full bloom. Rather than small clusters of white flowers with a yellow center this shrub creates 6″ long stems with clusters of up to 10 on each. The effect is a billowing cloud of white flowers for many weeks in June to July. No other native Philadelphus we have seen compares in number of flowers. The foliage is literally obscured by the lightly orange blossom scented white flowers. Fast growing even in less than perfect conditions to 9′ tall by 4′ wide in 7 years. The parent plant gets no supplemental water whatsoever relying on only what falls from the sky. The handsome mid green leaves take on yellow tints in autumn but is not a show stopper. In bloom, however, it is. Loved by pollinators. Full sun to very light shade in average to enriched soil. Water consistently for the first season to establish then none in subsequent years. Wonderful specimen or hedgerow member . Extraordinary in full bloom. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed AFTER blooming . This form has a  nice sweet scent that becomes most apparent several years after being in the ground. Associated plants in the wild are Corylus cornuta californica and Oemleria cerasiformis in the Willamette Valley. Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

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South African Honey Bush that we grow from seed. This bold sub-shrub/perennial entrances people with the large blue symmetrical, pinnate, serrated  leaves. Large plant to 6′ x 6′ in 5 years. Semi-evergreen it can freeze to the ground below about 20ºF and will vigorously regrow from the base in spring. Its important that Melianthus be very well established the first season going into its first winter. A large root mass ensures re-sprouting from the coldest winters. If the winter is mild 1′ tall inflorescences of black and red are odd, spectacular, and an ode to goth gardening in early summer. Rich soil that is never boggy in a warm, protected location with regular water to establish. Even if winter is only semi-cruel and the stems stand but with tattered leaves the whole plant can be cut to the ground AFTER ALL THREAT OF FROST HAS PASSED. Mulch for the first autumn w/ dry leaves and compost. Excellent at the base of a warm wall or a south facing aspect. Appreciates good care and water.. Mix with other large, bold perennials- Aralia californica (Elk clover) and Lobelia tupa (Devil’s tobacco) .  Very dramatic in containers.  Container grown plants should be protected from arctic cold (below 20ºF). The large leaves have the odor of peanut butter when disturbed/bruised. Its pungent and spot on. Not often bothered by deer. Might be somewhat rabbit resistant. Nice bold, tropical affect.We offer two other named cultivars, to be honest any one of these seedlings could be as good or exceed those cultivars.

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Bog deer vetch is a beautiful native perennial found in wet to seasonally wet sites throughout Oregon, but primarily Western Oregon. This rhizomatous perennial erupts from the ground in early spring with pinnate leaves that are deep purple. As the plant extends it changes to dark green and begins to bloom in crowns of pea flowers that are yellow and white. Very pretty. The symmetry of the flowers is especially attractive. To 2′ tall x 3′ wide.  Blooms April to June. Lovely native perennial for boggy sites. Amenable to average culture in  rich soil with regular H20 in summer. Easy to grow long lived perennial for meadows,  swales, vernally wet sites.  Excellent perennial for a rain garden. Takes dry conditions when established and goes deciduous with summer heat.  Competes well with invasive grasses. Possibly deer resistant. Often seen along streams in NW Oregon. Riparian perennial. Oregon native plant.

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This has become a famous  favorite floribunda rose of gardeners all over. It does especially well in our climate and even endures and blooms in considerable shade. The very full  double flowers are 4.5″ across. They begin as buds that are colored distinctly brown, as the flower unfurls it changes to more of a parchment color then to lavender and finally silver white. It has a  moderate sweet fragrance and it re-blooms continuously and heavily until frost. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Disease resistant foliage on an upright vase shaped shrub to  3” x 3′ wide. Rapid and heavy re-bloom provides cut material all summer into autumn. This old fashioned faded flower color is brilliant with other more solidly colored double roses of pink or orange. The pointed buds are formed on long stems. Rich soil with regular summer water for the fastest re-bloom.  Prune hard AFTER PRESIDENTS DAY ( about FEB 20th). Prune off  everything with a diameter smaller than a pencil. Very easy forgiving rose that makes all others look fantastic. I would never be with out this charming, bloomy excellent rose. A floribunda rose that is prolific but whose flowers are much more like a  hybrid tea. Appreciates three applications of a handful of organic rose food + a handful of Alfalfa meal around the base per season. On its own roots. Wonderful multicolor morphing magic rose.

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Artemisia douglasiana

Many learn this plant as Douglas Mugwort but its more official common name is Douglas Sagewort.  This aromatic vigorous perennial is common throughout western Oregon. It happily inhabits everywhere from ditches to the headlands at the beach. The plant has medicinal qualities that were used by native Americans and they also used the pungent smoke to ward off the spirits of the dead. To 3′ tall and spreading underground by rhizomes. This is a very vigorous plant when established, give it room and the respect it requires. In improved situations it can swamp other plants so best to leave your patch of sagewort to its own devices. Mix with other plants of similar vigor- Spiraea x pyramidata or Rosa nutkana. Give it at least 5′  x  5′ feet to roam. In summer plumes of off-white flowers produce a haven for pollinators. This member of the daisy family brings them from long distances. Very long lived deciduous perennial with long indented leaves that are dark green on top with an underside of pure silver. This makes this almost woody perennial very easy to spot in breezy conditions  It appreciates average soil and light water to establish.. If it flags in drought you may give it a deep drink in summer to refresh. Loved by a host of butterflies. Doesn’t need much love to perform. Oregon native plant.

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This wonderful grape vine was originally found along the Russian River by Roger Raiche and is absolutely stunning in autumn. This very large growing deciduous grape will eventually grow to 20′ and develop a sturdy, gnarled trunk. Grows about 3′-6′ per year. This is a wild hybrid between the European Wine grape and our native  vitis californica. What that yields is one tough plant that handles our climate like a champion. Best used in wild areas and if you are going to plant it to grow up a tree make sure the vine you start with is small and the tree you put it in is big. In September-November a long display of brilliant claret red foliage- the individual leaves can be 10″ across. Simultaneously it will sport dark purple edible fruit in large clumps. The medium green foliage is leathery and is best in part shade to full sun. Especially brilliant draping evergreen oaks as it was found in the wild. Climbs by tendrils but provide very strong support at least #4 copper wire.  Leaves arrive in mid spring. Very drought adapted when established. Water for the first season to establish then set it free. Vitis californica can be found in bot the Rogue and Umpqua river basins in Oregon.

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This is one of the very best of all shrub roses. Huge, single white flowers open in trusses . Each flower is 5″ across and open from dainty pointed blush pink buds. The enormous truss of flowers can have as many as 60 individual flowers and n full bloom it will obscure the foliage. Continual blooming after a huge initial late spring display this shrub is recommended as one of the very best of all white roses. Compact, upright habit is always good looking. The large foliage is disease  free and in scale matches the large flowers nicely. Deciduous and the last round of flowers can be left to produce small red hips at the tips. To 5′ x 5′ for full sun to very light shade, in rich soil with regular irrigation  (once per week in summer). Good looking from bloom to deciduous with red hips. This is a Xera favorite endorsed by each one of us. Blooms on new wood. Light fragrance.. Also attracts insects including bees. On its own roots.

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This is a very handsome and dependable hardy Agapanthus bred in Ireland.  It forms a spreading clump and in mid summer 3′ tall stems support multiple pendant midnight blue flowers.. Full sun and rich soil. Add a handful of lime to the planting hole. Our soils are acidic and this perennial likes neutral (7) Alkaline (sweet) soils to perform at its best. You can also plant it next to a concrete sidewalk which will also give it the alkalinity that is craves. The clump of scrappy mid green leaves is shorter than most varieties and maintains a tidy plant both before and AFTER bloom so it makes an exemplary garden and landscape perennial. Regular water is crucial through the bloom period, July /August when flowering ends and you cut away the dead stalks it remains good looking until it totally disappears in mid autumn. Irish and UK Agapanthus appear to have much greater cold tolerance than American selections,  they wait to emerge until all threat of a freeze has passed. Very cold hardy easy to grow wonderful pendant tower of cobalt blue. The truss of flowers is very large and showy. Good cut flower, loved by pollinators too. Limited quantities. One of the finest lily of the niles for our gardens.

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Cyperus alternifolius ‘Zero’

Umbrella palm or a close relative of Papyrus this normally zone 9 (20ºF) perennial is hardier and forms expanding clumps. This selection weathered 0ºF and lived, hence the name. Tall perennial for perpetually moist soils or shallow water in ponds. Also very useful in container water gardens. To 4′ tall the slender green stems sport an umbrella top of leaves. The radial leaves become decorated w/ small brown flowers in midsummer. This indeed has been very hardy for us. We’ve never lost it to cold. Easy to grow wetland plant that demands a lot of irrigation in open ground. The first hard freeze takes it down half way and by the end of winter is is usually completely deciduous. Returns in mid-late spring with real heat.  Full sun- very intolerant of shade. Forms a compact but slowly expanding clumps. Very easy.

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