Oregon bleeding heart is a widespread lush, long blooming perennial wildflower for moist conditions in shade to full sun. A somewhat rambunctious plant that spreads quickly by stolons. Do not plant it near shy or small plants that can become swamped. It tolerates quite a bit of shade and if in full sun it thrives with supplemental water and a massive flower display. Divided soft green foliage is very good looking, in April-July a continuous supply of rose colored downward pointing clumps of flowers on an 18″ spike. The foliage rises on average to half that height. Responds vigorously to amended soils and regular irrigation. In hot dry situations it will go quickly summer dormant. In the shade with water leaves persist to autumn and re-bloom  occurs. Not bothered by pests, including deer and snails and slugs. Frequently found in shady ditches in the Willamette Valley. Winter deciduous, if not already summer drought deciduous. An easy to grow, self sufficient perennial for wild areas. Mix with other vigorous and scaled plants. Very easy to grow.  Oregon native plant

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A widespread perennial in the Pacific Northwest. There are two subspecies and this larger leaf form is the more common of the two. A mounding deciduous perennial for moisture retentive soils in light shade to shade. This perennial is often seen along creek banks and seeps where access to water is not very far away. In May-July 18″ spikes of clear starry white flowers crowd a vertical stem. Very pretty and light. An excellent native perennial for woodlands, stream banks. riparian areas. Spreads in rich soil to form extensive colonies foliage tops out at 8″. Excellent combined with native and non-native ferns. Very dark green leaves are handsome throughout the season on a tough and easy to grow plant. Fall color is red and orange before leaves go away. AKA Trifoliate Foam Flower, Northwest Foam Flower. Not bothered by disease or pests that includes snails and slugs. YAY. Oregon native plant

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Frangula (Rhamnus) purshiana

AKA Cascara or Cascara sagrada. This is a widespread small tree to shrub in the northwestern part of the United states. West of the Cascades  its found in almost every biome. It can be a wind contorted shrub on blasting headlands at the coast. In the Willamette Valley its common where birds drop the berries/seeds on fence rows. Its even found in the Bitteroot mountains in Montana/Idaho. It was frequently used by indigenous people as a laxative. Cascara is a small round crowned tree/shrub. In drier locations it is more shrub like but in deep, rich soil with access to water it can grow to be a thirty five foot tree. Large round alternate leaves turn dark green and glossy in summer. In May and June the tiny greenish flower appear and transform into red fruits by autumn. This is the mechanism that makes this plant so widespread, its dispersal by birds. A lovely little straight trunked shade tree that requires almost no water once established. It functions as an understory component as well. Full sun to quite a bit of shade, including dry shade. Easy to grow and climate adapted. Average life span 35 years. In winter its very symmetrical open branch structure is handsome. Fall color is soft yellow to chartreuse and not especially showy. Oregon native plant

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Allium acuminatum

This delightful onion has a wide range in our state. Primarily you see it in dry, exposed sites a little way up from the bottom of the Willamette Valley. Mid green slightly fragrant grassy leaves give way to an 8″ stems in May-June with a chalice of multiple pink/lavender pink upward facing flowers. Full sun to part shade and adaptable to many soils as long as there is a dry rest in summer. This onion quickly goes summer dormant directly after seed set and disappears entirely by mid summer. Great pollinator bulb for Willamette Valley meadows. Its nearly always on a slope where it is found. Replicate this and give it only the rain that falls from the sky in subsequent years. In time the bulb multiplies and it can also self sow. Leave a disturbed area around the plant and keep it free of weeds and they can mature and bloom in several years. Light deer resistance. aka Slender leaved onion. Very attractive food source for butterflies.  Oregon native plant.

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Geranium tuberosum ‘Slender Silver Leaf Form’

This is a really pretty take on the more common form of Geranium tuberosum.  Rather than brilliant deep purple flowers this very distinct variety makes due with the hues pink and lavender. The foliage on this spreading bulb is what really shines. Deeply incised palmate leaves are brushed with silver hairs. This pairs with the more pastel colors of the flowers in a very good way. Rich soil to average soil in part shade. Once established rely only on what falls from the sky. Bloom is 4-6 weeks April to early June and the flowers wave above 18″ stems. Vigorous and healthy and not bothered by any pests, that includes slugs and snails who will leave it strictly alone. Goes quickly dormant with summer heat- disappears entirely. Very easy and satisfying perennial to grow in Cottage gardens, spring borders, will flower gardens. Combine with spring ephemerals and bulbs. Sophisticated cultivar that improves the species.

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We’ve met a lot of good gardeners and I’m always most amazed at peoples attention to detail. Good gardeners love detail. Mary De Noyer is a favorite customer and well known for her fastidious and beautiful garden. Several years ago Mary brought this seedling Podophyllum to us and asked that we grow it. Her only stipulation was that we name it ‘Audrey’.  Done! This is a remarkable perennial that we are proud to finally have a salable population. The large convex star fish shaped leaves are a glowing amber to madder red. Following the unufurlment and maturation of the leaves pendant dark wine red flowers appear on the leaf petiole- in this case the trunk. To 2′ tall a mature leaf can be more than 1 foot across. This probable hybrid May Apple is a bold and beautiful perennial for part shade to high overhead shade in rich soil with consistent summer moisture. Add all purpose fertilizer around the base each spring. For the first several years the clump of bold leaves increases close to a clump. After permanent establishment and with a lot of moisture this perennial will run by stolons. It will run as far as rich, moisture retentive soil allows. Beautiful plant. Thank you Mary De Noyer.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Hosta ‘Blue Mouse Ears’

Adorable blue leaved dwarf Hosta that we adore for brightening up shady corners and small spots. The thick leaves are slightly corrugated. In july 1′ stems support fragrant tubular light lavender flowers. To 8″ tall and forming an increasing clump to 1′ wide. Excellent in containers or rock gardens. Part shade to high overhead shade. The blue Hosta really do need protection from the sun. Protect emerging plants in April from slugs/snails. Rich soil with regular summer water. Extremely long lived perennial. A great dwarf Hiosta with real substance. Protect from deer and rabbits. Completely winter deciduous- disappears in September. Mix with white wood rush (Luzula nivea) and  Carex tumulicola ‘Willamette Gold’.

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This large hybrid shrub rose was a spontaneous volunteer at the Bellevue Botanical Garden in Washington. Big, soft green pinnate leaves are almost floppy. Beginning in May and repeatedly through summer 4″ wide rosy pink flowers with raspberry red stamens appear. They age slowly to light lavender in a few days. The huge single flowers are  often followed by large orange/then red hips. Each flower is so enormous that it bends the branches considerably when the flower is open. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Wonderful, informal, and showy shrub to 6′ x 6′ in a season. Blooms on wood from the current season. Prune heavily in early spring. Not bothered by most diseases, locate with good air circulation to stymie powdery mildew which it can be afflicted in cool, wet springs. Cool, floppy, cut rose with a slight fragrance. Thorny but not deadly. Regular water in rich soil. Add at least one handful of all purpose organic fertilizer in spring and again in summer. This rose is propagated on its own roots. Give this large, spectacular rose room to spread out.

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This Californian Sage is extraordinarily vigorous and spreads by underground runners to colonize large areas. That is if winter does not knock it back. Large quilted soft green arrow shaped leaves appear in early spring, by late spring 28″ tall chalice’s of rich red/pink (Raspberry) flowers erupt from dramatic and well spaced whorls. Rich to average soil that drains well. Water well in the first season to establish then very light to none in subsequent years. A Salvia of southern and central California  it has a distinctive aroma that is loved by some, despised by others. Mulch with dry leaves for the first winter or two. Doesn’t like wet plus subfreezing cold. Good, and restrained in a container. Protect containerized plants from extreme cold (below 20ºF). Nice and very dramatic cut flowers. Blooms March repeatedly until June. Great for hummingbirds, butterflies, and pollinators. Semi-deciduous in winter.

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Sisyrinchium idahoense var. idahoense

Idaho blue eyed grass is a widespread perennial that forms colonies in full sun, in many soil types, including vernally wet sites. To 18″ tall dark purple flowers open in bright light and close with cloudiness or dark. The blue green foliage is distinctively flat and the plant produces a procession of flowers for 2-3 weeks.  Deep purple with a yellow eye and about 1/2″ wide. An integral part of a Willamette valley meadow and only adaptable to full all day sun. Spreads by seed and  colonies that increase to form a slender clump.  Excellent pollinator perennial and is visited by a wide variety of insects.  Found in field that have not been invaded by invasives. Typically its found between native clumping grasses such as June Grass (Koeleria macrantha) Roemer’s Fescue (Festuca roemeri).and with other perennials of the meadow. It can be found from riparian to upland sites. Common associated plants are Carex tumulicola, Dodecatheon hendersonii, Ranunculus occidentalis, Dichelostemma congesta, Clarkia amoena, Camassia, ( C. quamash, leichtlinii ). Full sun, no shade. Water to establish the first season then none in subsequent year. Goes summer dormant and will awaken the following February. Oregon native plant

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