Lagerstroemia indica ‘Double Feature’®

Play it again is another trade name associated with this confusingly named but gorgeous shrubby crape myrtle. We’re very impressed with its performance, the first round of rich, cranberry red flowers appears in July- the color is deep and intense. In this selection no seed is ever formed and the plant will re-bloom continuously on the same flower stem. Watch the spent scape closely new buds seem to bubble out from no where. A compact growing shrub to 4′ x 4′ in 7 years. New foliage is deep wine red and retains the deep intensity of green. The small flower trusses completely obscures the plant in bloom. For the hottest, sunniest position in rich soil with REGULAR summer irrigation. Less over the years. It really does re-bloom continuously. Fall color is vibrant red/ orange. In time the thin stems/trunks exfoliates to a glossy tan sheen. Propagation prohibited. PP#22, 559

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One of my favorite separate strains of CA poppy. ‘Purple’ gleam is a tiny bit of an over statement. More accurate its pink w/ purple overtones and a lighter center. Blooms from April August in a wave of big flowers that tossles over compact plants with filigree blue foliage. Full sun and average  to even poor soil. Often potted Eschscholzia will perennialize and live for a year or two in the ground. Otherwise its an annual and will succumb when the whole plant blooms itself out. To 10″ x 12″ forming a spreading plant. Remove spent flowers to continue the show. Many plants will take a break over summer and then resume blooming w/ cooler autumn rains. Great pollinator plant. Containers, dry areas, borders. Reseeds reliably w/ about 80% true to parent type. Wonderful with Clarkia unguiculata ‘White’ and Collinsia grandiflora. High deer resistance. Leave open disturbed soil for it to reseed. Light summer H20.  Oregon native plant

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This is a strain of Agapanthus from the very cold hardiest varieties that we grow. Not only are these perfectly hardy to cold they are naturally completely deciduous. Even better they wait to emerge until all danger of frost has past. Many ‘hardy’ CA varieties leaf out in the false spring of late winter and then get nipped hard by possible late freezes. Not at all fussy about soil but best in enriched soil with light consistent summer irrigation. Large globes of rich sky blue flowers are bigger than a grapefruit and wave at the top of 3′-4′ stems. Quite a bit taller than other hardy varieties. Full sun to very light shade and not fussy. They will live in containers for eons and bloom like crazy. Flowers appear from late June to early August and are very showy. This is a very pretty tall strain that is reliable and kind of hard to F up. If you’ve lost Agapanthus in a cold garden or unfortunate freeze this is the one to try. Strappy clumps of mid-green leaves are handsome following bloom. As the plant multiplies it increases its blooms stem count markedly.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Rudbeckia triloba ‘Prairie Glow’

Impressive new perennial black eyed susan with three inch wide flowers in firey sunset colors. The interior of the petals has a zone of orange red fading to yellow tips. To 34″ tall forming an increasing clump. 20 or more flower stalks display the flowers from mid-late summer. Loved by pollinators as well as cut flower enthusiasts. Flowers last a week or more in a vase. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Deep soaks every 10 days is sufficient. Great companion for Echinacea, Erigeron, ornamental grasses. Winter deciduous but the dead scaffolding left holds seeds for songbirds. Easy to grow perennial for full sun to the very lightest shade, Plants are very upright and seldom topple. Re-bloom will occur if spent flowers are removed. Moderate deer resistance.

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Olysinium douglasii

Grass widows or Grass maidens  is a beautiful and fascinating perennial bulb that is native over a wide but scattered part of our region. Most common east of the Cascades it finds a home in several drier portions of the Willamette Valley. The summit of Spencer’s Butte south of Eugene is one location as are appearances in dry prairie in Benton county. One of the very first conspicuous wildflowers to emerge in February/March. From shallow soils, it lifts to 8″ tall with a wide nodding purple flower- the exact hue of each plant is slightly different. A clump of leaves follows the flowers before going neatly summer dormant. Best in rock garden conditions where you rely only on natural rainfall. Spreads in time to form quaint colonies. Once a Sisyrinchium this member of the Iris family is one of the dearest wildflowers for our gardens. Full sun- no shade at all and amend the soil w/ a handful of pumice. Water after planting until summer heat induces dormancy. Then never again.  Seed grown. Avoid crowding from other plants. It can and has been overwhelmed by invasive exotic grasses. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Echinacea x ‘Green Twister’

There are SO MANY Echinaceas its hard to sort the best from the chaff. We love this unique coneflower with sophisticated flowers of pea green and pink with a central warm honey colored cone. To 2′ tall and forming expanding clumps. Rich, WELL DRAINED soil with regular H20 for the first several years. After that it seems to be much more established and requires quite a bit less. Full sun to the very lightest shade. Very groovy, fragrant cut flower and removing spent flowers will lengthen the bloom season which begins in June and sputters out in September. Echinaceas can be a little tricky to establish. What they love is the combination of rich and WELL drained soil. So, incorporate ample amounts of compost and cut it w/ a lot of pumice. Water regularly but never boggy. Butterflies adore this flower and use the blooms as a conspicuous landing pad. Leave the spent flower seeds over the winter, mine have provided food for a number of species. Seedheads turn a handsome black. Moderate deer resistance.

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Cute little perennial Society garlic with wonderfully sweet fragrant flowers, Best described as intense violets. To 10″ tall and forming expanding but diminutive clumps that are deciduous in hard freezes. Blooms May-August. Excellent for warm rock gardens or containers. Protect containers from temperatures below 20ºF. In the ground it has survived slightly below 10ºF in rich, well drained soil and full sun. Best in a warm position where you can catch a whiff of the wonderful soft lilac colored flowers. Wonderful and sweet cut flower. The foliage on this species lacks the pungency of the more common T. violacea. Moderate deer resistance. Light, consistent summer water. Mulch with leaves if extreme cold threatens. South Africa.

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Western Buttercup is our own wonderful wildflower. This is the real thing and NOT the invasive Ranunculus ficaria. Traditionally it occupies open Oregon Oak woodlands and meadows including vernally wet meadows. Though it handles winter inundation it is also adapted to upland situations and in every biome it goes quickly summer dormant. Rosettes of pretty pinked leaves elongate in bloom to an airy spray of bright yellow flowers. Intimately, the petals have a glossy sheen. And growing up in the country it was traditional to put a picked flower under your chin and the reflected color yellow revealed that indeed you did like butter. Great cut flower that peaks on May Day and has made many a wild flower bouquet with purple Oregon Iris and purple Dodecatheon hendersonii- Shooting stars. Pictured here with Common Camas Camassia quamash at the Camassia reserve in West Linn, Oregon. Blooms from mid-April to early June. Vast meadows of western Oregon still harbor this sweet short lived perennial. Adapted to heavy clay soils- reseeds when happy. Suitable for mowed meadows as long as it has gone to seed by the time you mow. Wait until June.  Good competitor with invasives and absolutely integral to a Willamette Valley meadow. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant

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Lovely ubiquitous woodland flower that brings waves of glorious airy stars for weeks in late spring to mid summer. Occasionally pink the flowers most often are white. Handsome somewhat bold foliage provides a plant that is more than suited to competition on the forest floor. Often self sows and this is welcome. Plant containerized plants in spring and water faithfully through the first summer- but never boggy. Then it is yours. Let it romp among ferns, Hosta, Japanese Forest Grass for a sparkling NATIVE treat. Mix with other natives such as Vancouveria and deer fern. Very easy to grow. Blooms for a very long time and longer if we have a cool beginning to summer. AKA Candy flower. To 10″ x 10″ on average. Summer deciduous and emerges early in spring. Not bothered by pests. Forms spreading colonies in rich, humus enriched soil in part shade to shade. Locally native in the Portland city limits.  Oregon native plant. 

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Fuchsia ‘Suikkerbosse’

We took a break from Fuchsias for a few years, but its time to bring back some of the best. This compact, dense growing Fuchsia is a blooming workhorse. Sepals emerge green then take on terra cotta tints while the downward facing corolla is made of intense velvet plum petals. Cold hardy and it returns as a robust clump. To 2′ x 2′ forming a rounded outline. Excellent performance in full sun to part shade.  It becomes a little less compact in shade. This Dutch selection has survived all of the 16 years that we’ve grown it. An open north exposure is the best- open to the sky but no direct heat. Very good in containers. Rich soil and regular summer water. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring. Then remove frost damaged material. Wonderful Dutch selection. Beautiful plant.

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