Allium schoenoprasm

Allium schoenoprasm

Chives! Everyone needs these easy to grow, long-blooming, edible perennials in their garden. Late spring brings stems clad in rich lavender/purple flowers that are spicy and wonderful in salads. Cut back at any time and a new crop of tasty leaves will appear. To 18″ tall and forming clumps. Full sun and virtually any soil with consistent summer water. Moderate deer resistance. Often seeds around. These are easy to identify and dispatch or share with friends. A first-rate flowering border perennial as well. Winter deciduous.

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Agastache 'Rainbow Sorbet'

Agastache ‘Rainbow Sorbet’

One of our larger growing introductions this is a flowering machine with large individual flowers that open pale orange and senesce to pale pink. Overall this is a pastel flower palette. To 36″ tall and as wide in full sun and well drained soil with light, consistent summer water. Agastaches are excellent as container subjects- they will accept the most cramped roots and still perform. Wait until March to remove the previous years spent stems. Give this guy room. Hummingbird nirvana. Good winter hardiness.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Agastache 'Mandarin Dream'

Agastache ‘Mandarin Dream’

This is our selection of an improved form of the species Agastache auranticus. It has deeper orange flowers on taller stems and exhibits excellent winter/cold/wet hardiness. To 30″ tall, the vivid blooms erupt from June to October. Tightly clump forming perennial whose tall wand-like stems require more horizontal room as well. Hummingbird Mint excels in very well-drained soils with consistent, light summer water. Full sun- you can fudge in light shade and still get results. Remove the previous seasons spent stems in March. Agastache are plants that like oxygen in the soil and they often seed themselves happily between large stones. They appreciate soil that is rich but permeable at all times. We advise to wait until March to remove the previous year’s stem. The hollow stems that remain over winter actually provide oxygen to the roots. If you cut them back too early (Fall, winter) you also leave the new growth at the base unprotected from the elements. So, the stems should remain to both give the plant oxygen and protect the next seasons clump of foliage. Double dig the soil heartily and add a little compost and even pumice if your soil is stingy. Water regularly for the first season to establish a large root system which will require less H20 in subsequent years. This is a vibrant orange that mixes well with deep purples and blues.

Xera Plants Introduction. 

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Agastache 'Electric Punch'

Agastache ‘Electric Punch’

One of our all-time best introductions ‘Electric Punch’ is a floral powerhouse of a hummingbird mint with exceptional adaptation to our cold and wet winters. Rising to 34″ tall in bloom, a clump can become enormous in rich, WELL DRAINED soil with light, consistent summer water. Also, accepts no water but with interruptions in bloom. Incorporate plenty of oxygen into the soil and slopes are ideal. Do not remove flower spikes during the season- new orange aging to pink flowers appear from the same inflorescence. Best to wait until spring to cut back the previous seasons defunct stems. Moderate deer resistance. Agastache are best watered well for their first season, in subsequent years they will use much less.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Agapanthus 'Xera's Cobalt'

Agapanthus ‘Xera’s Cobalt’

Our own seed strain taken from the very darkest blue flowers in the Agapanthus kingdom. Prolific blooming, long lived, cold hardy perennials that require rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Full sun to very light shade. Blooms of the deepest cobalt to black rise on average to 30″ tall for 4-6 weeks in mid-summer. Completely deciduous in winter. Wonderful in the middle/back of a border and a natural with ornamental grasses and Kniphofias. Add a handful of lime to the hole at planting time and put the Agapanthus right on top of it. The parents of this strain are all naturally very hardy and do not emerge until all threat of frost has past. Hummingbird plant.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Agapanthus 'White Profusion'

Agapanthus ‘White Profusion’

Born and bred in the PNW this excellent compact and extremely floriferous white flowered Lily-of-the-Nile is a first rate selection. To 20″ tall and forming an expanding but compact clump. Flowers appear for 4-6 weeks in mid-summer. Clear, pristine white with abundant flower spikes- a small amount of leaves supports copious flower spikes- a great attribute of the best Agapanthus. Lots of flowers/few leaves.  Full sun to very light shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Completely winter deciduous. Handsome pale green matte foliage. Long lived perennial. Mix with Blue Agapanthus for contrast. Bloom stems increase markedly with the size of the clump. Our favorite hardy white Lily of the Nile. Agapanthus do best in neutral to alkaline soil. Incorporate a handful of lime in the planting hole.

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Catananche caerulea

Catananche caerulea

Cupid’s Dart is a simple to grow and wonderful perennial that blooms non-stop all summer long. The papery blue flowers with a deeper blue center attract all kinds of pollinators and are a specialty of Butterflies. Clump forming plant with tall wand like stems that support the flat flowers. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Full sun and a host of soils that are sharply drained. Regular summer water though it makes due with dry conditions when established. Highly deer resistant. Wonderful companion for roses and perfect with Lavenders for a long blooming light textured wave of flowers. Each flower closes tightly at night. To 20″ x 20″ forming substantial clumps.

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Lagerstroemia x fauriei 'Wichita' xera plants

Lagerstroemia x fauriei ‘Wichita’

One of the very finest very large growing tree type crape myrtles from the National Arboretum breeding program. Tall and not very wide in time this very fast and upright growing tree sports a spreading crown. In late July to October huge panicles of bright lavender flowers remain showy for weeks. Its a soft color but the display is opulent. In time the bark exfoliates to patches of cinnamon red and mahogany. Very showy. Fall color is an intense display of reds/orange/purple. Full sun and virtually any soil- thrives in clay soils and the reflected heat of parking strips. Of all the Crape myrtle cultivars perhaps this free blooming 26′ tall tree is the best for a candidate as a street tree-though it is never grown as such. This somewhat rare Crape myrtle never gained popularity because it does not root easily in large numbers. That doomed this wonderful tree in the nursery business. We’re happy to offer it on a limited basis.   Excellent cold hardiness as well as disease resistance. Well irrigated trees will easily put on 4′ of growth in a year. -Very pretty as a multi-trunked tree and virtually unheard of trained as a standard.

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Lagerstroemia x fauriei 'Pecos' xera plants

Lagerstroemia x fauriei ‘Pecos’

A deservedly popular tree in western Oregon for several reasons. Large globose panicles of clear pink flowers begin in urban areas as early as the beginning of July and repeat bloom until September. The open and vase shaped habit is graceful and bends gently under the weight of the huge flower trusses. In time this 15′ tree develops some of the best exfoliating bark of the genus. In late summer on trees older than 3 years the top layer of bark sloughs off revealing smooth, rich, chocolate brown trunks. Amazeballs. The bark is showy throughout winter. In autumn the foliage turns to shades of maroon and red. This crape myrtle MUST HAVE regular irrigation to grow and bloom. Excellent small garden tree with some of the lowest heat requirements to bloom. Water. You must water. National Arboretum release 1987, Spectacular tree in western Oregon. ‘Pecos’ has never been popular in the rest of the country. In fact, the main reason it was ever on the market is that the Nursery Monrovia is where many Oregon nurseries get their Crape myrtles. The two selected for the PNW and widely sold are ‘Pecos’- a great very early flowering pink. And ‘Zuni’ a rosy purple. But for Monrovias choice in marketing this tree might never have found popularity in the PNW. It is always the earliest and heavily blooming Crape myrtle in my garden. A splendid small tree.

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Lagerstroemia indica 'Catawba' xera plants

Lagerstroemia indica ‘Catawba’

One of the very first releases from the National Arboretum breeding program in 1967 and a fine purple flowered Crape Myrtle that has yet to be exceeded. Deep violet purple flowers occur en masse in August through October on this compact tree to just 12′ tall with a rounded crown. Full sun and rich soil with REGULAR summer irrigation to bloom. Water deeply once a week through the bloom period.Thrives and blooms in the hottest aspects. Regular water begun in April will assist in earlier and larger flower sets in summer. In autumn the foliage takes on brilliant neon orange/ red/ yellow tones that is just as spectacular as the blooms. In time the bark exfoliates to a smooth tan. Moderately mildew resistant- give it good air circulation in an open exposure. This tree makes a fine standard albeit of limited size. We grow it as a multi-trunked specimen. Long lived, easy to grow small tree. Catawba retains its popularity as there are few dark purple flowered crape myrtles whose  blossoms don’t fade drastically after opening. This selection retains the intensity of purple.

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