Abelia x grandiflora 'Francis Mason'

Abelia (Linnaea) x grandiflora ‘Francis Mason’

Tough, durable, and pretty evergold shrub that becomes a fountain of crystal white tubular fragrant flowers from July to November. Fast growing to 4′ x 4′ in just three years. Gold foliage contrasts well with madder red stems and calyxes of the flowers. Adaptable to both full sun and to part shade. Leaves are more vivid in full sun. Regular water to establish then just occasional water.  Amenable to all types of pruning. Sheared, chopped, lightly cut doesn’t matter, it regrows fast and blooms on new wood so you aren’t messing anything up. Hedges, specimens. The parking lot at Fred Meyers. Lovely shrub.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Agave harvardiana

Agave harvardiana

Spikes! A very upright and pokey Agave with steel blue/gray foliage that forms large rosettes. To 3′ across eventually this cold hardy Agave demands excellent drainage but is worth the effort. VERY well drained soil- amend with liberal amounts of pumice and gravel. Excellent on a slope. Plant with the rosette tilted to shed winter water. Makes new pups happily and they will often come up quite a distance from the parent plant. To 3′ tall when up and established. Great in containers that you protect from winter wet. Move to a covered place in fall- a south facing eave is sufficient. Cold hardy below 0ºF- when established. Best to plant in March or April so that it has the longest possible season to develop a root system going into its first winter. Light summer water to none. High deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Agave parryi ssp. neomexicana

Agave parryi ssp. neomexicana

New Mexico Agave is a spike wonder. Much more upright-growing than the species with sharp-tipped leaves that terminate in a blood red thorn. OW. Forms a very symmetrical plant with many leaves of steel blue. Full sun and VERY WELL-DRAINED soil. Excellent on hot slopes where it will tilt the rosette to avoid winter wet. Pups, heh, freely and you will soon have many rosettes. Amend the soil with pumice and gravel. Make sure there is plenty of air in the soil and no place where water could collect. Fantastic specimen plant for a dry garden/gravel garden. Water through the first summer to establish then none in subsequent years. Clean out the rosette when deciduous leaves collect in there- a shop vac works great. The leaves will cause rot when they decompose….so they must go. Great in containers- large, sturdy containers. Cold hardy. High deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Agave parryi ssp. truncata

Agave parryi ssp. truncata

Consistently one of the most successful Agaves for gardens in our region. Soft gray rosettes have leaves with a distinct upright habit. At the tips of the wide leaves is a single (deadly) black thorn. Very nice. Full sun and very well drained soil with little to no summer water when established. This Agave requires soil that is never soggy- amend heavily with pumice and gravel to create air pockets. Plant this (and all) hardy Agaves in our climate on a tilt. The tilted rosette sheds rainwater and it keeps it much drier in winter. Ideally, this Agave should be sited on a hot, south facing slope. In autumn deciduous leaves from (everywhere) seem to blow into the rosette and collect. You must remove these immediately so that they do not rot the center of the plant. A shop vac works wonders…so do bar-B-Q tongs. Excellent in containers. Its best to plant hardy Agaves in early spring to early summer. They require a long season to develop a tap root which in turn ensures that they are cold hardy. No tap root and not so hardy. Hardy below 0ºF when dry. Highly deer resistant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Anthyllis vulneraria var. coccinea

Anthyllis vulneraria var. coccinea

Kidney Vetch is a playful, short-lived perennial with shocking red flowers that come in clusters much like clover. Low, spreading plant that hugs the ground, all the better to see the piercing red flowers on this form. Seeds prolifically, and the seedlings are both easy to identify as well as move or dispatch. To 3″ tall by 18″ wide, when very happy. Loved by pollinators. Forms a vivid patch of color in the most unlikely places. Seeds germinate in autumn and bloom commences in spring. Excellent little nitrogen-fixing temporary plant for new gardens. Enriches soil in a wonderful way. Light to little summer water.  Mediterranean.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Antirrhinum sempervirens

Antirrhinum sempervirens

Cute little perennial Snapdragon species native to the mountains adjacent to the Mediterranean. Gray-green, almost succulent foliage is lush and is great with the profuse white snapdragon flowers which appear from late spring to mid summer. Full sun and rich to average, well-drained soil. Light summer water. Gets by with none but doesn’t look as good. Dies completely to the ground in winter and quickly resprouts from the base in spring. Rock gardens, gravel gardens, borders, hellstrips. Seeds around, and finds places that it likes. That could be the cracks in a wall or even pavement.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Arbutus menziesii

Arbutus menziesii

Pacific Madrone, iconic tree of the Pacific Northwest. Famous for its glossy, russet orange sinuous trunks, exfoliating bark, and round, evergreen foliage. In spring, clusters of white flowers are showy and turn into vivid red berries by autumn. These are loved by birds- especially western tanagers who will quickly strip a tree as flocks move from one to the next. Must be grown from seed and it must be transplanted when small. Just the way it is. Plant it in average, well drained soil. Water lightly through the first summer in subsequent years leave it strictly alone. Full sun is best- tends to wander towards the sun in shade. Underplant with low water natives such as Arctostaphylos, Ceanothus, Vancouveria. Slow at first it picks up speed after about 4 years- then it can grow 2′-4′ a year. Somewhat messy tree- loses older leaves in summer and the bark exfoliates all over the place too. Know this and live with it. Ours are raised from seed of trees native to our wholesale nursery site- so its a local strain. Pacific madrone is native from the highest mountains of southern California to southern British Columbia. It is the northern-most broadleaved evergreen tree (native) in North America. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Arctostaphylos columbiana ‘Pacific Coast’

This is a compact, dense growing form of Hairy Manzanita from the city of Manzanita on the coast. These are Greg’s collections. He chose several forms that had nice foliage, foliage color, habit, and resistance to disease. This form is one of the most compact of the three. Slightly smaller leaves are born densely on a more reserved growing plant. In late winter to spring clusters of white flowers  followed by drupes that turn distinctly red. Inland forms of this Manzanita have maroon to russet berries so this is a distinct difference. Beautiful dark, glossy maroon bark as for the species. To 6′ x 6′ in 7 years. Adapted to average to poor soils which will allow it to grow at a more reserved rate. Arctostaphylos columbiana reacts to richer soils, even clay soils with exuberant growth. Best in our native soils that are unimproved. Dig a large hole and provide regular water until you see good new growth then taper off. In subsequent years only what falls from the sky. Arctostaphylos columbiana (Hairy Manzanita) is a proto species one of the first and it is the most widespread Manzanita in Oregon and Washington.  Genetically it dominates and most of Calfiornia’s northern species are derived from ancient Hairy Manzanita. Provide full sun and good air circulation. Excellent underplanted with native annuals and Sedums. Good looking siver/ gray foliage year round. Extraordinarily drought adapted. Associated plants with the coastal species are Vaccinium ovatum, Pinus contorta ssp. contorta Garrya elliptica, Baccharis pilularis and Salal (Gaultheria shallon).  Often found with Festuca rubra on stabilized sand dunes.  Oregon native plant

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Arctostaphylos columbiana 'Parkdale East'

Arctostaphylos columbiana ‘Parkdale East’

This form of our native Hairy Manzanita was found quite far east of the Cascade crest and offers greater hardiness to cold. Unfortunately, it has the same characteristics of the species- it is unpredictable. To 4′ x 7′ with sage gray leaves and white to pink-tinted flowers in spring. Very well-drained soils in an open position with NO summer water when established. Dramatic smooth mahogany bark is an outstanding feature. This is the variety that is best suited to life in the Columbia River Gorge and possibly eastern Oregon in sheltered sites. It should easily tolerate -15ºF.  Best with total neglect and full sun. Russet berries follow the flowers into summer and autumn- always consumed by wildlife. Very limited quantities. This form has been successful in cold gardens east of the mountains where all other California varieties failed. Nice looking shrub.  Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Arctostaphylos columbiana ‘Wolf Creek’

Arctostaphylos columbiana ‘Wolf Creek’

Our native Hairy Manzanita is one of the most widespread species in the PNW. It is very susceptible to overwatering and overly enriched soils. .This can be avoided by strictly avoiding all irrigation once established and planting in average, unamended soil. Large-growing shrub with gray green leaves, the telltale hairy leaf petioles and white flowers in spring. Russet berries follow. Its best attribute is its smooth exfoliating mahogany bark. And in time you can remove the tired lower branches to reveal it as well as improve air circulation.  To 8′ x 8′ very quickly in average, well-drained soil. No summer water and little intervention from the gardener. Wild areas, dry hillsides. This form we selected from the southern Willamette Valley. It occurs in specific sites around the Valley and is common at the coast /coast range as well as the Cascades. Its populations are most stable on steep rocky slopes and sandy substrates at the coast where plants live longer in impoverished situations. During the warm interstadial (8000-4000 yr BP) when our climate was a bit milder but with a much more pronounced summer drought it was much more widespread- once found in the city limits of Portland at two sites those have been usurped by development. Excellent performance in hot dry urban sites.  Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Asarum splendens

Asarum splendens

As a dry shade evergreen ground cover foliage plant this wonderful perennial excels. Large heart shaped leaves are marked with silver over a sage green background. Pretty. Spreads to form dense colonies in rich, well drained soil in part shade to full shade. Must have regular water for the best appearance but can endure very dry conditions by wilting and will quickly recover with a drink. Takes the most dense shade and is invaluable in planters, beds, containers that are sited under an overhanging roof. Great winter appearance- it should be used in all sorts of year round containers more often. Spreads underground by stolons but doesn’t travel far. Bait for snails and slugs. Small curious brown flowers occur at ground level under the foliage in summer. To 6″ tall and spreading in ideal conditions to several feet wide.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Aucuba japonica 'Rozannie'

Aucuba japonica ‘Rozannie’

Rosanna Rosanna Danna is what I think of when I see this cute tough and useful shrub. I have no explanation, I just do. Slow growing broadleaved evergreen with deep forest green leaves that are glossy and pretty at all times. A female that is pretty much self fertile- My kind of woman, yeah 2018. Small green/brown flowers make themselves into glossy red berries. Bring a man around and the crop multiplies. Best in part shade in rich, well drained soil with light summer water. In reality once established Rozannie can go all summer and not miss a drink. To 3′ x 3′ and dense. Avoid blasting hot exposures which will yellow the leaves and rob the whole plant of luster. Supremely adapted to dry shade. Super cold hardy to quite a bit below 0ºF without any tragedy. Japan.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Bergenia ciliata 'Susan Riley' flowers

Bergenia ciliata ‘Susan Riley’

To be honest we had quite a bit of employee pushback when we said we were growing a Bergenia- I’m sure they immediately thought of that hulking, horrible looking, weevil notched ground cover with clouds of pepto pink flowers in winter/spring. That old horribly abused plant is definitely not this. HUGE round leaves have light fur on the reverse and make a wonderful statement in part shade to full sun (with water). In very early spring this cultivar named by Richie Steffan of the Elizabeth Miller Garden in Seattle- sends up wide inflorescences of pink tinted white flowers. Best with overhead protection of trees to ensure a late freeze doesn’t damage the flowers. This is a DECIDUOUS species and doesn’t seem to be root weevil food or suffer a bad looking period. New leaves ensure freshness all season. Give it a LOT of room to spread. Tropical looking foliage adds bold dimension to borders, woodlands. Regular summer water in well drained rich soil. Thanks Richie.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Bolax (Azorella) gummifera

Bolax (Azorella) gummifera

Incredibly useful and handsome and tough creeping evergreen ground cover. The fine interlaced leaves have a texture very much like plastic or tupperware. It creeps along forming tight rosettes that join. In summer the whole surface of this flush plant is covered in chartreuse yellow flowers. Not showy but conspicuous for a plant that looks uniform and green all year. One of the best ground covers between pavers as it can handle compacted soil better than other small scale ground covers. And this is a small scale ground cover, don’t try to cover acreage. Be reasonable and expect good coverage over a space no larger than 5′ x 5′.  Glossy foliage sparkles when wet. Regular summer water speeds growth though it is tolerant of dry periods  but not complete drought.  Expect each 4″ plant to expand to the size of an apple pie in a season. Completely deer resistant. Top dress with compost every few years- especially if it is between pavers. To 1/4″ tall by 1′ wide. Full sun to the very lightest shade. Carrot family.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Calamagrostis nutkaensis

Pacific Reed grass is a large and stately grass that is found close to the coast/ beach. A tall growing species with large flat green foliage and tall flowers that are at first green and then age to straw in summer. To 3′ tall on average, this plant can even perform as an epiphyte as is sometimes seen in forests adjacent to the beach. Spreads to form large clumps that are staunchly evergreen. Native from S. Alaska to N. California. This makes a wonderful casual plant with stiffly upright flower spikes. To  3′ wide  and clumping.  Average to amended soil, adaptable to clay soils. This is a great first line grass at the beach. It endures salt spray and poor soils. Easy to grow native grass for rough areas, meadows, forest verges. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. It may be cut back hard in the early spring,  but appearance is very stable throughout the year. Deer resistant. Very easy to grow. Light consistent water  inland, but drought adapted at the coast. Associated plants in the wild are Polypodium scopulorum, Picea sitchensis, Gaultheria shallon (Salal). One of our best native evergreen grasses for our gardens. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Carex oshimensis 'Evergold'

Carex oshimensis ‘Evergold’

Common variegated sedge that is useful. The arching thin leaves have an interior of rich yellow with green lines on the sides. Dense forming evergreen tuft to 1′ tall by up to 2′ wide. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular water in full sun to part shade. Tidy discolored leaves individually in spring- do not cut to the ground. It hates this. Gold stems support tan flowers in summer. Unfortunately, this sedge is often thrown into new landscapes and is marketed as a low maintenance carefree drought tolerant thing. Its not. It likes good care to look its best. Moderate deer resistance. Evergreen.

 

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Carex praegracilis

Carex praegracilis

Meadow Sedge  or Field Sedge is found primarily in meadows and grasslands east of the Cascades. An evergreen fine textured clumping sedge that is gracefully employed in mass plantings, lawn substitutes even freeway margins. Very adaptable plant for average soil with regular water for best appearance. It will make due with conditions that are much less optimal. To 14″ tall but bending immediately in a cascading motion that mimics movement by wind – even when its still. Forest margins, riparian sites. Very useful plant with good winter presence. Full sun to very light shade. Very useful in meadow plantings. Rarely seeds itself and is well behaved. And remember Sedges have edges, rushes are round and grasses like asses have holes. HEH.  Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Carex tumulicola

Foothill Sedge is commonly found from the central Willamette Valley south into California. A tightly clumping sedge with medium green foliage and 8″ wiry stems with attending flowers that are tan in spring/summer. In our region this plant can be found in upland situations where it is moist for at least half the year. Its also diminutive and almost hard to find in the wild. Under cultivation its an entirely different beast. Clumps are dense but expand with a pronounced weeping habit. To 8″ tall x 18″ wide for each individual plant. Good massed or as a lawn substitute. Takes mowing if its limited to once a year. Regular irrigation keeps it green and happy. Summer drought sees blades of tan as well as green and not so verdant. It does not run nor become a seeding pest- sticking surprisingly to itself. Plant on 1′ centers for a modern, mounding effect. Takes clay soils well. Water regularly to establish the first summer then taper off (continue watering if you want it to stay staunchly green).  Combines well with perennials including native perennials such as  Checkermallow (Sidalcea) and, Ranunculus occidentalis (Western Buttercup), as well as Shooting Stars (Dodecatheon) are found in closely related communities with this plant. Full sun to light shade, or high overhead shade. In California it is also known as Berkeley Sedge.  Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Catananche caerulea

Catananche caerulea

Cupid’s Dart is a simple to grow and wonderful perennial that blooms non-stop all summer long. The papery blue flowers with a deeper blue center attract all kinds of pollinators and are a specialty of Butterflies. Clump forming plant with tall wand like stems that support the flat flowers. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Full sun and a host of soils that are sharply drained. Regular summer water though it makes due with dry conditions when established. Highly deer resistant. Wonderful companion for roses and perfect with Lavenders for a long blooming light textured wave of flowers. Each flower closes tightly at night. To 20″ x 20″ forming substantial clumps.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Ceanothus integerrimus

Deerbrush is a widespread species in Oregon favoring areas with extensive summer drought. Its found primarily in the southern 1/3 of southwest Oregon  and the north central part of the state into southern Washington. A small population exists on Skinners Butte in Eugene.  Wide spreading semi-deciduous to deciduous shrub with young stems that remain green. Locally it is most common from about Dog mountain in the Gorge to the east and is extensive throughout Hood River and Wasco counties. This is an ideal shrub for revegetation areas, it naturally responds to fire, in fact the seeds must be exposed to boiling water to germinate. This species comes in a very wide range of colors. from clear white to deep blue and occasional shades of lilac pink. It may only be raised from seed so flower color is naturally variable. The plumes of flowers are large and airy displaying the color of the flower vividly. The most common flower color in Oregon is light blue. In late May and June a wonderful wildflower drive is up the Hood River Valley. These frothy blue, to pink to white flowers literally foam out from under native oaks and conifers. Its very conspicuous at that time too on the Rowena plateau. A word of warning not only does this shrub encourage deer browse it is also the unfortunate home of many deer ticks. Photograph carefully. Here it is found with such associates as Holodiscus, Toxicodendron, Symphoricarpos and Arctostaphylos.  This brushy plant derives its name from the familiar site of black tail deer breast height chomping away in extensive groves. Not a long lived shrub 7-10 years but it fixes nitrogen efficiently and improves the soil for successors. Full sun to very light shade, best on a dry slope. Water to establish then only what falls from the sky in subsequent years. Very hardy to cold enduring subzero temperatures. Beautiful pollinator heaven in bloom. To 3-7′ tall and as wide in several years. Oregon native plant.

Photo Credit: Dii Mazuz, Bruce Hegna

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: ,


Chitalpa x tashkentensis 'White Dawn'

Chitalpa x tashkentensis ‘White Dawn’

A very pretty  intergeneric hybrid tree between Catalpa and Chilopsis (Desert Willow). We really like this small tree that forms an umbrella shaped crown in time. To 20′ tall and continuously producing opulent large white flower clusters- the interior of the flower is marked with purple veining- much like an exotic orchid. The flowers appear on new growth and are continuous from June to September. The long thin tapered light green leaves have a nice texture. They do not color up appreciably in fall- making due with light yellow to off green before abandoning the tree. Excellent garden tree. We prefer the white flowered form as the often planted pink variety …..well, lets just say Portland has a LOT of pink flowering trees. Fast growing in youth-especially if well watered in summer. Otherwise, supremely tolerant of drought as well as rough, hot urban conditions. Casts moderate shade in time. Breaks dormancy late- usually late April. Be patient.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Clarkia amoena 'Dwarf Pink'

Clarkia amoena ‘Dwarf Pink’

Farewell-to-spring is a common wildflower of meadows and glens in Western Oregon. It gets its name because it is often the last wildflower to bloom before the summer drought ends the show. This form differs by its pure pink profuse flowers on a dwarf plant. (The wild form is lavender with a red blotch in the center of each petal.). An amazing display of bloom that appears as if someone dropped a bouquet on the ground. You see no evidence of leaves when its in full fettle. Blooms June to October in a garden setting with regular summer water and rich soil and the gardeners diligence removing spent flowers. Reseeds in open disturbed soil.  to 10″ tall and a little wider forming a dome. Nice cut flower. Fun variation on a native. Very attractive to native pollinators. True hardy annual. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Clarkia amoena ssp. lindleyi

Farewell to Spring is so called because it is one of the last conspicuous native wildflowers to bloom before the onset of summer drought. And bloom it does  all the way to late August. Its seen in mass populations waving above the already sear grass on hillsides that dot the valley. Little water is needed but a little supplemental water and removing spent flowers will extend the show.  Otherwise it will die upon setting seed. The 2′ tall stems support multiple luminous pink cup shaped flowers. They appear superficially like a poppy. This is the variety that is locally native in the Portland area. The distinctly lavender pink flowers fade to a lighter interior near the center. But it will also appear with a darker pink/red blotch in the center of each petal on a minority of seedlings.  These assist in guiding pollinators and this plant is a prime source for all native bees and butterflies. Excellent cut flower that lasts for quite a while in a vase. This is the source species of all the fancy cultivars that are raised in the cut flower trade. Reseeds happily in open disturbed sites. Excellent plant for wild areas and is often employed on road cuts and freeway embankments in deliberately sown wild flower mixtures. I’ve noticed that this local subspecies re-sows itself annually where other subspecies and especially the showy florist varieties are shy to do so. If you want a robust, climate adapted wildflower then go with this subspecies. It comes back strong. Probably our showiest and longest blooming native annual.  Reseeds- leave stems to dry and disperse seed and remember to leave open spaces for next years show. Wonderful with yellow Madia elegans for a months long display of brilliant native annuals. A Xera favorite plant. See video below (IMG) taken at the William Finley Wildlife Refuge just south of Corvallis.  Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Cryptomeria japonica 'Birodo'

Cryptomeria japonica ‘Birodo’

Wonderful easy to grow dwarf form of Japanese Cedar. This form has not scales but more like tiny needles. In summer the foliage is deep green. With cooler weather it takes on amazing russet tints. Very slow growing to 3′ x 2′ in 8 years. Incredibly dense growth habit gives the appearance of diligent pruning- but none is required. Extremely drought tolerant. For full sun and little summer water once established.  Rock gardens, containers, gravel gardens. With or without other dwarf conifers. High deer resistance. An excellent truly long term dwarf conifer that retains its good looks. It would make a great no prune hedge that maxes out at 4′ tall but provides density. Very good resistance to subfreezing wind. This performs very well in the Columbia River Gorge  and eastern suburbs of Portland. Static form but dynamic seasonal color shifts. Cool.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Cupressus glabra 'Sulphurea'

Cupressus glabra ‘Sulphurea’

Remarkable form of the hardy Arizona Cypress. This variety has foliage frosted in chartreuse/cream with interior foliage closer to sea green. A great affect. To 15′ tall but only 4′ wide this is a decidedly fastigiate form of this species. Fast growing tree for screens, specimen. Poor to average soil- avoid rich soil- this causes Cypress to grow to fat and fast in our climate- they get rank and rocky. So plant in average to poor soil with light irrigation until you see appreciable new growth and then none- ever. This produces a more measured growth rate and a sturdier plant. Full sun- from ALL directions- no shade at all. Open exposed sites are best. Very pretty plant that adores our climate. Cold hardy below 0ºF. Rare tree and quantities are limited. Completely drought tolerant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Cyrtomium falcatum

Cyrtomium falcatum

Japanese Holly fern we love as a great fairly large evergreen. Large glossy fronds extend to 2′ long in a substantial rosette. Part shade to shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Very heat tolerant- but requires shade. Excellent container fern- great winter appearance. High deer resistance. Mass under shrubs, in woodlands for a great texture and year round good form.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Dasylirion wheeleri

Dasylirion wheeleri

Sotol or Desert spoon is an excellent Yucca relative that does amazingly well in our climate given the correct conditions. Native to the northern Chihuahuan Desert of northern Mexico into Arizona and stretching to the east through New Mexico into Texas is where you will find this handsome desert dweller. Rosettes of serrated blue green leaves radiate out in a circular orb. The ends of each leaf become frizzy and add an overall hazy texture to the plant. In time, when happy 9′ spikes erupt from the center and display columns of small white flowers. Very well drained soil in a full, hot position. Excellent on hot, south facing slopes but perfectly at home in the dry gravel garden. Foliage to 3′ x 3′ slowly. Evergreen. Light summer water to establish then none in subsequent years. Great in containers. High deer resistance.

 

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Digitalis obscura

Digitalis obscura

One of our fave foxgloves, this (sub)shrubby species forms large spreading plants with multiple spikes of the most amazing flowers. 2′ spikes support tubular orange flowers with an interior of russet brown and more intricate markings. An excellent candidate for hot sunny slopes as it is native to the Iberian peninsula. Full sun, well drained soil and light summer moisture. Reseeds happily in open disturbed sites and those seedlings can be dispatched, moved, or shared with friends. Spectacular flowers appear in spring and continue into summer. High deer resistance. Average lifespan of an individual plant is 3-5 years. Dry borders, gravel gardens, exposed areas with voracious deer. Wonderful plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Epimedium wushanense 'Spiny Leaved Form'

Epimedium wushanense ‘Spiny Leaved Form’

Beautiful barrenwort selection of an already beautiful species. Large spiny leaves with a glossy sheen begin in shades of vivid salmon red with darker mottling on new growth changing slowly to medium green by mid summer. A really good evergreen perennial that always looks its best. Evergreen leaves over winter fairly well, and if they get beaten up simply chop the leaves to the ground in February. In March, accompanying the stellar new growth tall spikes of many congest off white and pale yellow flowers seem to pour out between the new leaves.  All in all its a great color coordinated perennial, dynamic and always changing. Clumps expand markedly in rich, moisture retentive woodland soil. Avoid blasting bright sun. To 2′ x 2′ shortly. Moderate deer resistance. Adapts quickly to dry shade conditions.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Beach fleabane or beach daisy normally runs in a mauve, to periwinkle vein. This lovely selection turns it up with crystal white daisies and a bold yellow center.  Long lived perennial that is very adaptable. To 6″ tall a happy clump will spread to 2′ wide or more. Low and spreading it displays the flowers upright in a mass. This beckons pollinates and they always find this easy going daisy. Full sun, rich to average soil with regular irrigation through the bloom period. This not only keeps the plant verdant it encourage re-bloom which can occur until September. The initial huge show of flowers begins in late May into July. Excellent perennial for the top of a wall where it will happily creep over the edge and follow the contours on the way down. It may be cut back hard after the initial large flush of flowers, this tidies the plant and sets the stage for another big show. Not bothered by deer and often left alone by rabbits. This daisy is most conspicuous in habitat on the cliffs adjacent to the beach. It also perches on sea stacks. Beach fleabane ranges from the Northern Oregon coast south all along the California coast. Mix with other Erigeron glaucus cultivars for depth of contrast- this is when all the flower colors look the most distinct. Very easy to grow and it also absorbs the heat of parking strips with no issues. Cold hardy. Oregon native plant

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: ,


Erigeron glaucus 'Cape Sebastian'

Erigeron glaucus ‘Cape Sebastian’

Beach Flea Bane or more popularly Oregon Beach Daisy is a phenomenal native perennial for our climate. Low and spreading a continuous supply of periwinkle/violet daisies with a yellow center appear from late spring to autumn and occasionally in winter. To just 8″ tall it forms 2′ wide spreading clumps.  Simple spoon shaped green leaves. In its native environs which is the cliffs immediately adjacent to the beach it can cling precariously which shows it has sturdy roots. Full sun to light shade and regular irrigation or absolutely none when established. This floriferous and larger flowering selection is from the southern oregon coast. Excellent performance in hells strips..at the front of borders. This excellent semi-evergreen native perennial should be everywhere. Cut back hard after blooming to tidy the plant, keep it compact and encourage more flowers.  Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Erodium 'Pickering Pink'

Erodium ‘Pickering Pink’

‘Pickering Pink’ Cranesbill. The name sounds like it will have an all pink flower. Not really. The simple five petalled flowers have two petals that are pink on top with a distinct black blotch. The two lower petals are soft pink almost white. This contrast of colors gives this small plant extra impact as well as a fun wild flower appeal. It forms a tight mound of soft, divided foliage to 3″ tall by 10″ wide. The cheery flowers are born on 6″ wiry stems. Blooms appear continuously from mid-spring to frost. Erodiums bloom and bloom with little intervention from the gardener. They also excel in the rough life of hellstrips. In borders, rock gardens, containers, even small meadow gardens this European native is excellently adapted to our climate. Light summer water increases the flower display and spent flowers can be snipped to not only spur more but to achieve a tidier look. Evergreen foliage and low stature also make it appropriate between pavers. Some deer resistance as well as rabbit resistance.  Very easy to grow.  Full sun.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Erodium chrysanthum

Erodium chrysanthum

Cranesbills come in all colors but this is one of the most garden worthy, in fact its one of the best perennials for our climate. A GREAT PLANT PICK. Tightly clumping perennial with frilly silver intricate leaves. Beginning in spring and continuously to frost a constant supply of soft yellow cupped flowers on 5″ stems. They come in waves through the season. Pale yellow with silver. YUM. Full sun and rich to average WELL DRAINED soil. Light to little summer water- actually once its established I never water it and everything is just fine. Nice en mass. Rock gardens- thrives in the hellstrip. Not a fan of shade. Winter deciduous- unusual for an Erodium. Long lived.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Erodium x 'Fran's Delight'

Erodium x ‘Fran’s Delight’

If you’ve never grown any of these selections of Crane’s Bill- Erodiums which are close Geranium relatives you really are missing out. This cultivar is a Xera favorite. Low clumps of dense frilly gray foliage are evergreen and a cool canvas for the constant supply of outward facing luminous lavender purple flowers on 8″ stems. Continuously from March to October it produces these simple flowers that have a darker purple blotch on the bottom two petals. Much wilder looking than hardy Geraniums they are invaluable because they take up virtually no space- and again their bloom season is phenomenal. Not bothered by pests of any kind- including slugs and snails. Deer mostly over look them but they will dine if their attention goes that way. Full sun to quite a bit of shade which does not diminish their blooming power. Well drained soils of average to slightly enriched fertility. Remove spent flower spikes to to tidy and encourage more flowers. Forms a clump to 1′ wide in time. Fantastic plant. Come on join us in the world of Cranesbills.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Erodium x 'Merstham's Pink'

Erodium x ‘Merstham’s Pink’

Flowery, easy rewarding perennial that blooms consistently from April to September. This sprawling plant assumes a rounded shape and bears 4″ stems with cup shaped rose pink flowers. Loved by pollinators and if it takes a break from blooming in the heat you can give it a hair cut and and some water and wham! you are back in business. The low, flush leaves are bright green and frilly and mostly evergreen. Great wildflower appeal that does not flail or swamp as most hardy geraniums do. It sticks to its place- about 1′ x 1′. Very good along steep walls or in a cottage garden. Excellent companions are Dianthus ‘Dainty Dame’, Scutellaria suffrutescens, and Penstemon ‘Enor’ for a low water flowery ensemble. Cut back hard in early spring. Light consistent water improves blooming. Great nectar source for Butterflies and bumble bees often nap in the cup shaped flowers. Cold hardy. Some deer resistance. Adaptable. Full sun to very light shade or high overhead shade. Great in containers. Long lived perennial cranesbill.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Erythronium hendersonii

Henderson’s Fawn Lily or Pink Siskiyou Fawn lily is one of our most beautiful species. Native from the Siskiyous in southern Oregon into extreme northern California. Of the eleven Erythroniums that are native in Oregon this is by far our favorite. In late March to late April umbrella shaped luminous pale pink petals reflex on 10″ stems. The interior of the downward pointing flowers shows markings of yellow and deep maroon. Surprisingly FRAGRANT and the perfume is noticeable at quite a distance in mature stands on warm spring days. Wonderful native bulb that must be grown from seed. The tiny bulb which is no bigger than a very small bean sinks lower into the ground each year. By blooming size the bulb may be 1′ below the surface. It takes approximately 3 -4 years to bloom from seed. Forms open colonies and spreads in the wild and garden by seed. As the bulb enlarges multiple scapes will appear from a single clump. In late winter a basal rosette of mottled  leaves appear at ground level. Protect newly planted Erythroniums from slugs. Established plants seem to escape their damage.  Best in unamended average soil on a slight slope. In habitat they are almost always under oaks and madrone. So, light shade to afternoon shade. Very light water after planting then none in subsequent years. Rock gardens, dry woodlands. Exquisite fawn lily. Goes quickly summer dormant.  Oregon native plant

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Eschscholzia californica ‘Pretty in Pink’

True pink California poppy. Seed from this exceptional pink flowered selection comes true about 95% of the time. Deep rose pink semi-double flowers appear in late spring and continue sporadically until mid summer. A happy plant can become a short lived perennial but the majority will behave as bloomy annuals. Full sun and rich to average soil with good tilth (crumbly texture). It can even thrive in compacted soils. To 10″ x 10″ forming a compact plant with lacy blue foliage. The strident rose pink flowers are showy from a distance. Leave the last round of flowers to seed for the next several seasons. Excellent wildflower display in rough areas w/ low water. Water plants to establish then taper off. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Wonderful flower color. Mix with Eschscholzia c. ‘Alba’ the white form. Deer resistant and drought adapted native plant. Oregon native plant. 

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Eschscholzia californica 'Willamette Valley Form'

Eschscholzia californica ‘Willamette Valley Form’

Plants don’t really stay in the same place, They move according to climate and soils and with the help of humans. This famous poppy carpets meadows and glens and rocky hillsides in brilliant orange from SW Washington through Western Oregon into California to Baja  but is happily grown throughout the globe. Sunny orange flowers with an edge of lighter yellow in our local form appear from mid spring to late summer. This form was identified in 1846 at the former town of Tonquin. Tonquin is about 500 yards from our nursery and this poppy is everywhere. Blue fine foliage on spreading plants to 14″ tall and up to twice that width. Full sun in any soil where water does not collect. Reseeds itself prolifically and can become your own introduced weed. Seedlings are easy to spot and dispatch if unwanted. Nice cut flower if you pick it in bud. Loved by pollinators. Easy to grow native annual/ sometimes a perennial. Water to establish plants then none necessary. Completely deer and rabbit proof. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Euphorbia x ‘Copton Ash’

Well behaved lovely early summer blooming Euphorbia hybrid with fine blue foliage and umbels of chartreuse flowers that remain effective on the plant for 4-6 weeks. Easy to grow clump forming perennial that is winter deciduous. Foliage to 10″ tall supporting the flowers to 14″ high. Sterile hybrid- will not reseed or become a pest. Long lived perennial for full sun and rich to average well drained soil. Light summer water. Excellent en masse. Cut back spent stalks in winter to make way for a whole new crop of stems/flowers. Good deer resistance. Drought tolerant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Euphorbia x 'Dean's Hybrid'

Euphorbia x ‘Dean’s Hybrid’

FANTASTIC long long blooming easy to grow and spectacular Euphorbia hybrid. Large clumps support wide umbels of electric gold flowers. They appear in spring and are effective on the plant well into summer. Foliage is fine, mid green and is a great backdrop to the never ending flowers. Semi-evergreen. A beautiful and valuable perennial for full sun and well drained soil. Little summer water required. Excellent heat tolerance and performance in hell strips. To 2′ tall and forming clumps a little wider. Mix with Salvias, Eryngiums for  visual perfection and the same culture. Moderate deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Euphorbia x ‘Purple Preference’

Excellent Euphorbia hybrid selected for deeply hued purple foliage that it pairs with early spring panicles of large chartreuse yellow flowers. Semi-shrubby evergreen perennial for RICH soil that drains quickly and light summer irrigation. The foliage goes through several hues before settling to deep green (purple to mustard to green). To 3′ tall and half as wide. Completely sterile hybrid that will not reseed or become a pest. Long season of bloom and interest. Appreciates the good conditions. raWonderful contrast between the chartreuse flowers and purple emerging new growth.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Festuca roemeri var. roemeri

Roemer’s Fescue is a native bunchgrass found on upland prairies and slopes throughout the PNW. In the Willamette Valley it survives on the upward margins of woods, often under Oaks and accompanying California fescue. Roemer’s Fescue has much finer leaves and a tighter clumps than Festuca californica. Its immediately identifiable by this thin blue green foliage. A cool season grower it spends the winter in its freshest and lushest state by the onset of summer drought it has already gone dry dormant. To 8″ tall and spreading. 1′ spikes with tan flowers appear in late spring and remain erect until the entire plant goes summer dormant. With regular water and good drainage this grass will avoid summer sleep and remain green and lush. A common component of Willamette Valley Oak Savanna and losing ground to invasive weeds. Excellent underplanting for drought adapted shrubs, or for the garden/wild lands interface. It spreads quickly by seed- its from here, you should expect that so keep it away from highly manicured areas. Its habitat in the Willamette Valley has shrunk to almost nothing. Bring this pretty native bunchgrass back to our gardens. Admirable lawn substitute. Evergreen. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Fragaria chiloense 'Aulon'

Fragaria chiloense ‘Aulon’

Pacific coastal strawberry is a beach native- in fact it occurs all around the Pacific Rim and makes an adorable and durable ground cover on sand dunes. Well this version is like the giant hulk of strawberries. Huge in every way and vigorous? Wow, plant and get out of the way. The large glossy evergreen leaves are up to 6″ across and the single white flowers in spring and summer (sometimes in winter) are large also. The paltry fruit that follows is far from edible. It won’t kill you but you really have to like sour and gritty with millions of seeds.  This is an ideal ground cover for rough sites in full sun to part shade. Don’t bother enriching the soil that will just make this trailing monster roar. Instead err on the side of a little neglect and watch what this native plant can do. Be wary of delicate plants in the vicinity. Evergreen, easy and drought tolerant. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Geranium cinereum ‘Lawrence Flatman’

Many hardy Geranium have lost favor because they are either huge and unwieldy perennials or they don’t bloom for long enough. This one does neither. A low compact tuft of silvery foliage mostly stays put. Beginning in spring and continuously through summer simple copious purple flowers appear with a lavender back drop and dramatic darker raspberry veining. Very pretty- in combination with the foliage its a winner. Floriferous enough to be used in seasonal containers. This hardy geranium appreciates full, hot sun and open site and well drained soil. Light but consistent summer water. The flowering stems will elongate and climb  through nearby plants and flowers will show up where you least expect them. Foliage clump to about 18″ wide. Completely winter deciduous and not bothered by slugs or snails.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Geranium cinereum ‘subcaulescens’

Where one needs a little blast of neon magenta this extraordinary and long blooming hardy Geranium can oblige. Clump forming plant with wiry trailing stems that wind through other plants before displaying the 1″ wide neon flowers. Full sun and rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. An excellent species for our climate. Carefree and long lived and that flower color- wow, nothing quite like it. Magenta. 10″ tall and spreading to 20″ wide. Winter deciduous. Combine with light yellow flowers for a brilliant contrast. Slug resistant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


This is an exciting new form of the butterfly glad, which we lovingly refer to as Gladzilla. So far, this cultivar is not nearly as rambunctious but is vigorous. Forming large colonies by bulb offsets as well as seed. Gray/green foliage rises to 16″ in clumps. In  mid summer a large display of Ruby pink flowers appear in staggered stems up to 24″. If left to its on devices and just watered a good clump can yield more than a dozen stems. It makes a fantastic cut flower and unopened buds will be forced open in the vase. Full sun and AVERAGE soil with REGULAR water for the first season then light irrigation in subsequent years.It is vigorous enough that you can rely on water alone to check its growth. Very easy to grow cold hardy perennial Gladiolus. Very long lived. Mixes well with other vigorous perennials for full sun and regular water. Not bothered by deer or pests. To 2′ wide as a clump. Winter deciduous. South Africa.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Gladiolus x dalenii ‘Boone’

Found by a NC extension agent at a very old homestead in Boone, a cold mountain town in the western part of the state.  This very old hybrid cultivar of Gladiolus dalenii and ? Its also listed at the hybrid G. x  gandavensis. A wonderful COLD HARDY perennial Gladiolus that we dearly adore. Pale orange outside simple petals surround a center of intricate coloring. Green, pink, yellow. Very wild compared to the big border babies but a true multiplying perennial that will quickly form a clump with a dozen or more flower spikes. Blooms appear for 4 weeks in the middle of summer. They rise above a healthy bunch of soft green spear shaped leaves. Full sun and rich soil with no standing water in winter. To 22″ tall and spreading to 1′ wide in about 5 years. Not bothered by deer – YAY and a great perennial for rural areas. In urban places the only protection it requires is from your flower arranger friends cause the subtle color combination in this flower can be tastefully echoed in a bouquet. Naturally cold tolerant and very easy to grow. Protect from Cutworms on emergence. Long lived perennial

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Glumicalyx gosseliodes

Nodding Chocolate Flower. An unusual hardy perennial from very high elevations in South Africa. A spreading- trailing evergreen plant to 1′ x 1′ in a season. In summer above the rubbery stacked foliage dense groups of bud open to nodding orange flowers. The back of the slightly tubular flowers is pale cream- a nice dual color effect. Up close it pumps out the fine fragrance of chocolate. Blooms for about one month. Full sun and rich to average, well drained soil with regular summer water. Works well in containers and you have a better capacity to enjoy the flower fragrance. Easy to grow little perennial of great grace and it will often self sow when happy. Easy to grow.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
 |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Grindelia integrifolia

Willamette Gumweed, Puget Gumweed is an important native late blooming pollinator plant.  A native resident in the Willamette Valley along water courses and marshlands- It seems to excel in areas that are wet in the winter and bone dry in summer. That kind of adaptation begs for its inclusion in bioswales and to stabilize stream banks. In normal garden conditions gumweed – which derives its common name from the gummy coating on the leaves. It has a  tar-like fragrance and is positioned on the leaves to decrease evaporation. It may also impart some resistance to saline conditions. In June-Sept. this large, spreading plant is decorated with corymbs of bright yellow daisy flowers. Immediately they are attended by pollinators. Its fascinating. The flower bud is densely armed with prickles giving this native daisy kind of a tough look. To 30″ x 30″. Full sun and rich to average conditions. Tolerates clay soils if you water it consistently to get the new roots into the clay soil. Once established it’s a very drought adapted plant. It also improves substantially under cultivation. Combine with Symphyotrichon subspicatum ‘Sauvie Sky’ and Solidago for a native prairie redux. Winter dormant. Seed grown from plants native to the Willamette Valley. Moderate deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Helianthemum ‘The Bride’

The combination of silver evergreen foliage and the clear white pristine flowers of this perennial is exceptional. To 6″ and spreading May to June the foliage is obscurred by a daily supply of flowers. Very showy. Full sun and light but consistent summer water. Cut back hard when blooming has ended. This yields a more compact tidier plant. Good deer resistance. Banks, hillsides, parking medians. To 3′ wide.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Hesperaloe parviflora

Red Yucca. Who would have thought that this remarkably adaptable plant would grow perfectly in such places as Phoenix, AZ AND Portland? We’re amazed and this excellent semi-succulent plant is one of our favorites for hot dry landscapes. The evergreen leaves form rosettes that spike up to about 2.5′ tall- blue green turning purple in colder weather. They are lined with little white hair filaments that add to the appeal. in summer flower spikes rise to 4′- many of them and hold tubular flowers that are succulent and red on the outside, when each yawns open it reveals a yellow center. Very cool. Full sun and average to poor well drained soil- though it does fine in any soil type that drains well. Excellently adapted to life in the blasting hot hellstrips. It can take any kind of reflected heat with no summer water and still perform beautifully. Clumps increase slowly in our climate. Excellent in containers as well. Loved by hummingbirds. Little to no supplemental water ever. Cold hardy below 0ºF. High deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Illicium floridanum ‘Scarlet Skirts’

Florida Anise shrub is a cold hardy shade tolerant and aromatic broad leaved evergreen with exotic red flowers for long periods in spring and again in autumn.  To 8′ x 4′ in 7 years in rich to average well drained soil with regular summer water in full sun, drought tolerant in shade. Moderately fast growing and summer water speeds growth. Very hardy to cold native to SE United States. Highly deer resistant. Spidery black red flowers appear in early to mid spring and again in autumn. They turn into star shaped seed pods that become woody. Flowers have an odd scent which is barely detectable from a distance as it blooms here when the weather is cool. Hedges, specimens. Great companion for Rhododendrons in a woodland. A Xera Plants selection with larger, darker black/red flowers. Long lived.

Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Impatiens omieana

People love this perennial (hardy) Impatiens- they are immediately drawn to its very pretty foliage and for most of the season thats all there is. Spreading as a low herbaceous perennial to just 16″ tall but many feet wide when happy. Rich, loose, hummusy rich soil that drains quickly with regular irrigation. Part shade to quite a bit of shade. Ideal under large shrubs, in shady spots. Each pointed leaf is minutely scalloped with a red to yellow central vein. The undersides of the leaves are madder red. In autumn relatively large tubular ( or police helmet shaped) flowers of soft yellow appear at the tips. The show is late and to be honest most people kind of miss it. Completely winter deciduous. Avoid blasting hot sun and compacted soils.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Impatiens omieana ‘Ice Storm’

Pretty version of this hardy perennial impatiens. It forms mounds of lush foliage that has a light icy sheen on the surface of the leaves. If you look closely at this cultivar the leaves actually sparkle as if they were inlaid with crystals. Groovy. To 2′ x 3′ spreading in part shade to shade in rich, well drained soil. Consistent summer moisture. In autumn the tops of the plant bears many tubular light yellow flowers that are surprisingly large. Completely winter deciduous.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Impatiens omieana ‘Silver Pink’

Large, bold foliage perennial for shade. Vigorous dome forming plant with large maroon/green leaves with a central pink mid-rib. In mid-autumn subtle but large light yellow flowers appear. To 2′ x 3′ for rich, well drained soil and regular summer irrigation. Good drainage is helpful as well. Contrasts nicely with gold leaved plants. Avoid hot sun and dry conditions. Great with an annual application of compost. Winter deciduous. More vigorous and shower than the species. Great under large established shrubs. Winter deciduous.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Indigofera amblyantha

Cool Indigo shrub that produces erect stems of light pink flowers w/ a touch of white. The flowers appear on new growth and as long as the plant is vigorous the display will be too. Deciduous woody shrub to 8′ tall by 8′ wide in a season. Established plants may be pruned to the ground in early spring and will vigorously rebound and bloom. Loved by pollinators. Not a dense shrub rather a light texture that is almost see-through. Very fun and flowery and easy to grow in full sun to light shade in average soil w/ regular summer water. I’ve never seen this species set seed in our climate. Cold hardy below 0ºF as a subshrub that can freeze to the ground below 10ºF. Pinnate leaves as for the species is a soft light green. Admirable cut flower- a whole branch yields many flower inflorescences. Remarkable shrub that can difficult to locate. Loved by butterflies. We grew this pretty shrub years ago and have brought it back.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Indigofera decora

Chinese Indigo is one of our favorite perennials/subshrubs. Arising from the ground in late spring the arching stems to 3′ support 6″ long pendant pale rose pink flowers for months and months. No intervention needed from the gardener. In time it suckers to form 4′ wide patches. Regular water to establish in average to rich, well drained soil. Full sun. Freezes completely to the ground in winter- cut back defunct stems from the previous year in early spring. When it does emerge its a very quick trip to up and blooming. Incredibly drought tolerant when established but light consistent watering seems to encourage new flowers- as it grows it blooms so you want to keep it growing. Incredibly elegant but tough plant that asks for so little but gives so much.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Jasminum nudiflorum ‘Aureum’

Winter Jasmine cheers us greatly when its shocking yellow (scentless) flowers erupt along the arching and climbing bare green stems of this shrub/vine in winter. Beginning in December it opens flowers continuously until a crescendo is reached in late February. To 9′ tall trained as vine. The lithe stems must be corralled and pegged or twiddled through a lattice. Be patient it will get there. Blooms occur on wood from the previous season. Prune directly after bloom has ended. Fast growing as a scandent ground cover. To 3′ tall x 8′ wide very quickly. Very nice trailing over banks, walls. This form has gold splashed leaves that appear in spring adding another dimension to this plant. Light summer water or none when established. Rich, well drained soil is ideal in full sun to part shade. Winter deciduous. Moderate deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Kniphofia ‘Lightning Bug’

We selected this Kniphofia years ago for its nearly white flowers and habit of reblooming throughout summer. Flowers begin in late spring and rise to 30″ tall and continue to be produced periodically until fall rains arrive. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water to re-bloom reliably. Apply an annual application of compost or all organic fertilizer to increase vigor, performance. Combines well with Agapanthus, Tulbaghia, Middle of the border. A nice contrasting bloom spike intermixed with subdued ornamental grasses. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Slowly increases its clump size. Semi-evergreen. Good cut flower.

Xera Plants Introduction

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Kniphofia ‘Saffronvogel’

Superior re-blooming cultivar with glowing pale coral and cream flowers. Forms expanding clumps of grassy foliage and begins sending up 28″ spikes of flowers in early June. Quick repeat of flowering occurs for two more months in rich, moisture retentive soil with good drainage. Add an annual application of compost to increase vigor spur rapid re-bloom. Wonderful, ethereal flower color that is at home with pink/orange Agastache and the pale lilac flowers of Tulbaghia violacea ‘Big Violet’. Winter deciduous. Full sun to very light shade.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Kniphofia ‘Shining Scepter’

Even though this poker blooms but once the color is so intense and the amount of flower spikes on one clump of plants so impressive that we have to include it. 3′ tall flower spikes support HOT orange solid colored flowers from June to July. The clump expands annually in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Full sun to very light shade. Winter deciduous. Very easy to grow hummingbird food.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Kniphofia ‘Timothy’

For pale coral/pink flowers ‘Timothy’ is tops. From a clump of relatively few leaves multiple spikes of 3′ tall richly selfed flowers rise up. A beacon to hummingbirds and a great harmonious color in the garden. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water to spur re-bloom which will continue through the very hottest weather. An annual application of compost and all purpose organic fertilizer will result in more vigor, flowers, and re-bloom. Full sun to very light shade. Long lived elegant perennial. Nothing like the brash bicolor flowers of the old fashioned K. uvaria- the standard old poker. Excellent and dramatic cut flower. Removing spent flowers encourages more. Give the clumps room to expand with little competition from other plants. Moderate deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Kniphofia ‘Toffee Nosed’

Stunning poker with unusually colored flowers that are a kaliedescope of colors all within one spike. Opening tinted russet brown the expanding tubular flowers senesce to pale cream. To 4′ tall in bloom and forming prodigious clumps in rich, well drained soil. Regular summer irrigation spurs rapid re-bloom which can extend well into autumn. A clump with multiple flower spikes is spell binding. Hummingbird food. A fantastic and dramatic large cut flower. Foliage is semi-deciduous. Apply an annual layer of compost and a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring to increase vigor, blooming spikes. Fantastic with the ornamental grass Pennesetum spatheolatum. And any ornamental grass for that matter. Full sun to partial shade. To retain vigor and heavy blooming add a layer of compost or a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring. Light consistent summer water.

 

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Kniphofia pumila

Little known but spectacular poker that we love for its HUGE late summer flowers of shocking acid green. Each flower spike includes up to 1′ long spike of tubular flowers. Forms a large tropical looking grassy evergreen clump. Full sun and rich well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Apply an annual application of compost to increase vigor. To 4′ tall in bloom the clump of grassy foliage expands to 3′ wide. Give it the room that it needs. Depending on the weather flower spikes can occur any time from June on but mostly cluster in Aug-Oct. Semi-evergreen. Moderate deer resistance. Cold hardy.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lagerstroemia x fauriei ‘Hopi’

For our climate this is one of the very finest summer blooming small trees. Forming a perfectly round dome in time to 12′ tall and nearly as wide this free blooming tree also requires the least amount of water to sustain it and bloom. Beginning in mid-July large trusses of bubble gum pink flowers appear and they completely obscure the foliage of the crown re-blooming non-stop until the end of September. In fall reliable and incredibly showy orange  to red and yellow fall color is stunning for an extended period of time. The bark sloughs off of older trees to reveal a glossy gray surface. Moderately fast growing this should be a standard landscape plant in our climate. Exceptional cold hardiness and no fear of disease.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lagerstroemia x fauriei ‘Muskogee’

One of the first hybrid named cultivars released by the National Arboretum in 1978 and a fantastic cold hardy large free flowering tree. Fast growing tree to 25′ tall and half as wide in 10 years. Beginning in late June large trusses of lavender pink flowers appear and are lightly fragrant.. They increase in abundance and peak in a massive bloom in August. The tall trunks exfoliate to a glossy taupe/patches of tan. Very pretty and exotic looking tree when large. There is a 30′ specimen- one of the first hybrids planted on the west coast in 1974 in SE Portland. Its a spectacular shade tree. Fall color is a brilliant mix of orange and red. Exceptionally hardy to cold. Best with regular irrigation- which speeds growth markedly and improves bloom. Otherwise it takes summer drought in stride. Excellent for use as a street tree. Long, long, bloom season. Fantastic, well behaved large garden tree.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lagerstroemia x fauriei ‘Sarah’s Favorite’

A really good free blooming tree sized crape  myrtle with profuse huge white flower trusses and astonishing orange bark. This is a fast growing tree and if properly irrigated can achieve easily 4′ a year. To 22′ tall and half as wide. Very similar to ‘Natchez’ with several distinct differences. It is a little hardier to cold. For those in cooler rural regions where there is insufficient summer heat to harden the wood for winter this is a good choice. The flowers are primarily held upright as opposed to pendulous on ‘Natchez’, The bark tends more towards pure orange (like a madrone) rather than mottled. Full sun and rich to average soil with regular summer water. Blooms early July to September. Fall color is vivid orange and red. Very nice garden tree and good as a street tree as well.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lagerstroemia x fauriei 'Wichita' xera plants

Lagerstroemia x fauriei ‘Wichita’

One of the very finest very large growing tree type crape myrtles from the National Arboretum breeding program. Tall and not very wide in time this very fast and upright growing tree sports a spreading crown. In late July to October huge panicles of bright lavender flowers remain showy for weeks. Its a soft color but the display is opulent. In time the bark exfoliates to patches of cinnamon red and mahogany. Very showy. Fall color is an intense display of reds/orange/purple. Full sun and virtually any soil- thrives in clay soils and the reflected heat of parking strips. Of all the Crape myrtle cultivars perhaps this free blooming 26′ tall tree is the best for a candidate as a street tree-though it is never grown as such. This somewhat rare Crape myrtle never gained popularity because it does not root easily in large numbers. That doomed this wonderful tree in the nursery business. We’re happy to offer it on a limited basis.   Excellent cold hardiness as well as disease resistance. Well irrigated trees will easily put on 4′ of growth in a year. -Very pretty as a multi-trunked tree and virtually unheard of trained as a standard.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lavandula angustifolia ‘Miss Katherine’

You don’t often think of lavender flowers in the color of pink, but this compact heavily flowering selection produces masses of clear pink flower spikes for months in summer. Mixed with purple and white flowered varieties and you get much more depth of contrast. The purple and white both look better. Compact gray foliaged shrub for average, well drained soil and light summer water. Full sun. To 2′ tall in bloom the foliage usually maxes out at a globe 14″ x 14″ . Cut back hard after blooming for a denser more compact plant. Fragrant flowers, foliage. Moderate deer resistance. Very easy to grow. Hedges, specimen. Etc.

My Favorites

Plant type: , ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lavandula angustifolia ‘Pastor’s Pride’

When you have a small garden you want to get as much bang for your buck as possible. Enter this great cultivar of English Lavender that blooms not just once but over and over again until frost. Medium lavender blue flowers cluster at the top of straight wiry stems to 10″ long. A naturally compact plant to about 2′ x 2′ ultimately. Silver evergreen aromatic foliage. Rich, to average well drained soil in full sun with light summer water. Somewhat drought adapted. Looks better , re-blooms better with light water. Saches, Lavender wands, potpourri- everblooming fragrant hedge. Very good Pastor. Very good.

My Favorites

Plant type: , ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lavandula x angustifolia ‘Purity’

We asked the man who knows lavender the best which white Lavender did he recommend? And he fired this off the top of his head and then brought one for us- Thank you Andy Van Helvingen. A REALLY stunning plant. Compact with many CLEAR WHITE flowers in dense clusters at the end of strong straight stems. The plant is compact and grows that way – much slower. To 16″ x 18″ with bloom spikes above. Flowers early June to August. A charming plant that does not cling to discolored brown flowers instead they just kind of melt away so it does have an extra pristine appearance at all time. Shear spent blooms to their base to encourage a more dense and floriferous shrublet in the future. Wonderfully aromatic hybrid with english Lavender. Moderate deer resistance. This would combine in a perfect way with pink and blue flowered varieties- ‘Hidcote’. Avoid planting closely with L. x intermedia, cause those will flop and smother this little gem.  Great for small hedges, rock gardens, and herb knots. Pungent for drying, potpourri. Full sun and rich to average soil with reasonable drainage. Not good in shade.  Lavenders also require very good air circulation- plant accordingly. Average life span 5-7 years, Light summer water.

My Favorites

Plant type: , ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lavandula x lanata ‘Ana Luisa’

So many lavenders that we’ve decided to go with the very best. This hybrid is a cross between english lavender (L. angustifolia) and wooly lavender (L. lanata) and gives you wonderful almost white wooly foliage with deep purple thick flowers. To 2′ tall and 2′ wide in time this rounded evergreen shrub blooms for an incredibly long time beginning in early summer. Full sun and rich to average soil with light but consistent summer water.  Very easy to grow in our climate. Shear the spent flower spikes and cut into about 1/2″ new growth for a compact and more densely blooming habit. Excellent landscape plant, informal hedge or specimen in a border. This Lavender looks good year round- better winter appearance than most. Lightly deer resistant. Not their first choice but not 100% immune to browse either. Aromatic foliage. Wonderful white foliage contrasts greatly with deep green foliage for depth in plantings. Bred and named by Andy VanHelvingen of Vanhelvingen Herbs.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Leptosiphon ‘Star Dust’

BABY STARS!  Cute hardy annual that is actually a west coast native. Also known as Stardust this little plant produces adorable stars in pink, orange, yellow, and white. All together a tapestry of color on just 3″ tall plants. Reseeds prolifically in open disturbed sites. Just one potted plant will yield hundreds of seedlings for the following year. Blooms May- July then dies, goes to seed, is no longer there. Great bulb cover. Little to no summer water for self sown seedlings. Primarily composed of Leptosiphon parviflorus which is native to central California. Our own locally native Leptosiphon bicolor is similar and In the wild the flowers are primarily pink with a yellow eye- occasionally other colors. Adorable. Baby stars.  Leave cleared space in your garden near these plants to allow these plants room to re-sow. Competition from other plants is the main reason that this plant loses its grip in the garden. Simply scratch a bare area near each patch and do not remove the spent plants until they are properly straw and dropping their fine seed. Delightful lining paths. Creates the most honest looking wildflower vignettes possible in our gardens. Full sun.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Limnanthes alba

Willamette Valley white Meadowfoam is such an unassuming plant with an incredible tough streak. Finely divided grass green leaves are completely obscured by the copious cup shaped white flowers. Opulent bloom begins in April and extends to early June. Forms connecting mounds that knit together into one sheet of ivory petals. Native to the central and southern Willamette Valley. It can be seen occasionally on road cuts and the gravel on street margins. But planted en masse it is spectacular. Excellent plant for tough, compacted, clay soils. To 4″ tall and each plant is about 1’wide. Leave spent dried stems where you want the next years display to be.  Germination in autumn precedes most cold season weeds and forms an effective cover crop. Though prolific its well behaved enough to live between shrubs and even perennials. Excellent mixed with Baby Blue Eyes and Yellow and white Limnanthes douglasii.  Water containerized plants at installation then none necessary. Self sown seedlings are MUCH more drought adapted and can germinate on soil as hard as concrete. Moderate deer resistance. Beautiful native wildflower.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Limnanthes douglasii

Meadow foam is a native hardy annual that occupies the flood zones in the valleys in most of Central and northern California up to the southern Willamette Valley, mainly in seeps and floodplains,  To 4″ tall and up to a foot wide the grass green finely divided leaves are a great backdrop to the yellow flowers which are cleanly tipped white at the edge of the petals. Vigorously reseeds in any soil in full sun to part shade. Leave the dead straw to disperse the seeds or simply shake it where you would like next years display to be. And it WILL RESEED PROLIFICALLY- by early autumn you will achieve an enormous patch. Don’t worry if they are crowded the seedlings seem to work it out.  This is a fantastic method for inhibiting winter weeds- YOU get to chose your weeds and this is an easy to deal with plant. A great annual to eclipse the fading foliage of bulbs.  No supplemental water required. Completes its life cycle by the heat of summer and has already set hundreds of seeds for the following years crop. This from just one 4″ pot.  Winter weeds are the worst cause we aren’t out there on patrol so this is greatly helpful.  And the cycle begins again each year. Meadowfoam honey is wonderful btw. Very sweet with a sharp clover tang.  Oregon native plant

 

See video click on IMG 4574

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Limnanthes douglasii var. nivea

White meadow foam is a prolific native hardy annual that covers the bottom of inland west coast valleys in white in mid- late spring. Demure plants are actually a floral power house with tons of pure white flowers creating a foaming ivory carpet in bloom. By the heat of summer this true annual ends its life cycle but not before producing millions of seeds to renew the display for the next year. Takes all kinds of soil including compacted dry clay. No additional water is required once established. Each plant is 4″ tall by 6″ wide and they grow together to form an impenetrable layer. One planted potted plant yields hundreds of seedling. White meadow foam is a stunning western native that deserves more use. Native to the Portland city limits. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lonicera hispidula

Hairy Honeysuckle or wild pink honeysuckle is a common vine in the western part of our state. Ranging rom S. British Columbia to California. This sprawling and twining plant is most associated with the cover under white oak woodlands. This vine can crawl to impressive heights into trees. As a child near Eugene this grew extensively on our property. It would climb pole sized trees and I would strip the winding canes off the trees and use them as a trellis for annual vines. The strong wood lasted 10 years or more. It derives its name from the conspicuous hairs on the leaves. At terminal ends of the branches soft pink curly flowers appear in cymes from June to September. These are followed by brilliant red berries that are food for birds. It has no fragrance. Excellent plant for stabilizing banks and hillsides where its incredible tenacity and drought tolerance is an advantage. Never a tidy plant this vine can be sent up a trellis or large tree. Water to establish then set it free. This honeysuckle can be afflicted with aphids early in the season but I’ve never seen it actually inhibit the plant. Just make sure not to look to closely at the plant in May-June. Evergreen to semi-evergreen with round leaves that surrounding the stem nearest the ends just before the flowers appear. Best in wild areas.- for some it can lack the sophistication of our other native honeysuckle Lonicera ciliosa. and is not as immediately beautiful. In habitat it consorts with Oregon White Oak (Quercus garryana) Poison Oak (Toxicodendron diversifolia) and Creeping snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus). Often found clambering up steep rocky slopes in dry woods. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn5b -10º to -15ºFZn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lupinus albifrons

Our locally native silver leaved lupine. A wildflower that beckons gardeners with incredible metallic silver foliage and spires of blue and white flowers from late spring into summer. It has some exacting requirements. Its best to know where you find it in the wild. Steep, steep cliffs and steep open road cuts. What do they have in common? Excellent drainage and little summer water. Spreading almost shrubby evergreen plant to 2′- 3′ wide on average. The very pretty fragrant flowers rise up to about 3′. It seems to resent a lot of competition from other plants- give it room, its own space and again, perfect drainage.  Highly deer resistant also not as attractive to rabbits. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lupinus rivularis

Streambank lupine or Riverbank lupine is widespread shrubby species native to western Oregon. Its full range is from extreme southwest British Columbia (where it is endangered) to northern California. Large growing, spreading plant that can almost achieve a sub shrubby habit. To 3′ tall in bloom forming an evergreen shrublet to 3′ across. From late April to early July spires of blue flowers with a white keel erupt from the plant. Very pretty in bloom and incredibly important to pollinators and insects who feast on the flowers as well as leaves. The true species has flowers that are all blue, its found primarily on sand bars in major rivers on the west side of the state. Most seed that is grown and dispersed is a selected bicolor flower. Short lived plant 3-5 years. Following the flowers conspicuous seed pods turn a dark color, These may be allowed to open and disperse in the OPEN DISTURBED SITES that it craves. Excellent in concert with California poppies where it has become a famous duo on our freeways in the spring. Good cut flower. Not bothered by deer. Water to estalblish then leave it to natural rainfall. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Luzula pilosa ‘Igel’

We’ve been impressed with this evergreen, ever lovely, ever symmetrical sedge from Europe. Tightly clumping deep green plant to 6″ tall x 11″ wide in time. Rich, moist, well drained soil is ideal. Protect from blasting sun and reflected heat. Excellent performance in woodlands, sunny, irrigated borders. Imparts both a natural look but its habit is so symmetrically round that it also gives a modern feel. May be massed for a profound soft effect. Regular summer water- especially during heatwaves. Excellent performance in containers. Easy to grow. Evergreen- but it can look a little burned if we have extreme cold- not to worry new growth quickly hides any tatty leaves in spring. Avoid dense, dry shade, dappled overhead shade is ideal. Deep green appearance year round.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Mahonia nervosa

Cascades Mahonia is found throughout the western part of Oregon occupying shady environs under the tree canopy. Low growing creeping evergreen with large deep green leaves. They emerge in spring tinted bright salmon before settling to their mature color. In spring spikes of fragrant light yellow flowers appear and then turn into small edible blue berries. Which also attracts birdlife to the forest floor. To just 2′ tall but a single plant can spread to 5′ wide in 6 years. Part shade to shade in rich, humusy soil with regular summer water. Established plants get by with nothing. Takes some patience to establish and a lot of water. Mulch annually.  Moderately deer resistant. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Matthoila fruticulosa

Stock, the common early spring cut flower with that is wonderfully fragrant of cloves. The sweet perfume can be detected at quite a distance. This is a cold hardy, PERENNIAL version of that beloved flower. Forming a semi-woody dome like shrub multiple spikes to 10″ long eminate from the crown and bear pristine cleanly white flowers with that dazzling perfume. Great fragrant filler in bouquets. Native to mountainous areas around the mediterranean. To 2′ x 2′ and becoming a multi branched shrublet. Full sun and rich to average soil with light consistent summer water for the first season. Good drainage is important and its a natural plant for a slope. Established plants can get through summer without irrigation. The long strappy leaves are gray/green and add to the overall appeal especially when decked with white flowers. Average life span 5-7 years. Do not coddle. Combines well with Cistus, Halimiums, Helianthemums. Dianthus where it will compete for perfume. Very reminiscent of a Wallflower (Cheiranthus) and accepts the same cultural requirements. Blooms May-August. Pronounced muh-TOY-luh

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Muhlenbergia lindheimeri

Most grasses in this genus native to North America really do prefer a hotter, longer summer than we have. But this one has surprised us and we are in love with it. Strongly clump forming evergreen grass with thin blue/green blades that rise to about 1′ tall. In late summer spikes erupt and as they unfurl they reveal a long feather like inflorescence that is up to 2′ long. The sun shining through this taupe/white group of flowers is purely luminescent. To 4′ tall and 4′ wide for full sun and average, well drained soil full sun. Excels on slopes- especially hot slopes. It requires just light summer irrigation but established clumps get by with none and still perform. Wonderful grass to plant among such things as Arctostaphylos and Grevilleas. Cut back to the foliage in spring. Really good looking dryland grass from the Texas Big Bend country.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Nemophila maculata

Five spot is a showy and adorable west coast native true hardy annual that delights under oaks with 1″ wide white and blue flowers. One deep blue dot at the tip of each of the five petals. To 4″ tall and sprawling to 8″ wide the cheery flowers appear from late March to June before the plant completes its life cycle and dies and goes to seed. Reseeds reliably in open disturbed sites. Fine leaves on small rosettes tell the story in autumn. Self sown plants require no supplemental water. One potted plant will yield hundreds of seedlings for the following spring. West coast annuals are cool. Found in a small part of Josephine and Jackson counties in southern Oregon. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Oemleria cerasiformis

Oso berry is a classic west coast shrub. Its one of the earliest shrubs to burst into leaf and flower long before anyone else- often as early as early February.  Exceptionally fresh green leaves emerge vertically and for a time appear as rabbit ears lining the stems. On female plants fragrant chains of white flowers are showy in a very spring like way. Following pollination chains of charming fruit (the berries or plums)first turn yellow then red/orange and arrive at deep purple. They are reputed to be good. And even though I’ve known this plant my entire life i’ve never tasted a ripe berry. Seems like they disappear to wildlife very fast. There was a thicket of this early spring shrub near the bottom of our long driveway and it would leaf out and bloom in February and March. When I spotted those acid green leaves I knew that winter was over. To 8′ x 8′ quickly from a massively suckering central shrub. Branches soar up and arch out. All the better to observe the colorful fruit. Native, often under Oregon white oaks and in dry woods with Holodiscus discolor/ Ocean spray, Corylus cornuta californica /Western Hazel. By late spring this shrub has all but faded into the background. Often it will lose many or all leaves in a very dry summer, but its drought tolerance is phenomenal.  Fall color is soft yellow and shows up nicely on the dark forest floor. Its natural range is from the N. Bay area in CA north to extreme SW British Columbia. Always on the west side of the mountains. Stems force well when brought inside in December- January. Deer resistant and possibly rabbit resistant. This is a very wild looking shrub, goes well with other plants of that mein. Stirs early pollinators and even Anna’s Hummers. These are unsexed seedlings. Best in part shade to shade though it will tolerate full sun with a less refined overall look. Water lightly but consistently for the first summer then none in subsequent years. Virtually any soil type including heavy clay. Simultaneous bloom with flowering currants (Ribes sanguineum). A great garden pairing.  Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: ,


Omphalodes cappadocica

The blue stars of this borage relative are unmistakenly breathtaking in spring. This European relative of forget me nots (Myosotis) forms spreading clumps which give rise to clouds of sky blue flowers from March to June. To 6″ tall and 15″ wide in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Very pretty with early blooming Epimediums and the pale primrose yellow flowers of Primula vulgaris. Nice looking corrugated foliage. Part shade. Regular summer water. Resistant to slugs/snails.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Ophiopogon umbraticola

Probably the best looking and easiest to grow lily turf species for our climate. Tightly clumping deep green grasslike mounds of foliage are good looking YEAR ROUND- no scorching or freeze burn. To 8″ tall x 10″ wide eventually it thrives in quite a bit of shade to even sun if irrigation is consistent. Loves heavy clay soils and will happily live in standing water for part of the year. Established plants (1-2 years) are much more drought resistant even in full sun. The glossy leaves are just 3mm wide and 10cm long. In summer masses of white flowers appear within the foliage. These turn into masses of large, vivid sky blue berries which are showy well into winter. Excellent for massing (plant on 8″ centers) for a small scale ground cover. For this application it plays to amend the soil with compost and all organic fertilizer to speed growth and establishment. Excellent as a marginal plant near natural ponds and creeks. Very deer resistant. Native to eastern China.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  | 
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  | 


Ophiopogon umbraticola ‘Sparkler’

Without a doubt one of the finest lily turf/liriopogons that I have ever grown. Dense clumps of fine deep green leaves are handsome at all time. Including unblemished after the hardest winters. In early summer with in the leaves small spikes of white flowers are not conspicuous and by autumn they have transformed in to luminescent turquoise berries. Not slow for a lily turf and tolerant of everything from compacted soils to intense dry shade. Will take full sun but with regular irrigation or foliage can yellow. To 8″ tall and expanding to almost a foot wide within several years. Line paths, mass as a ground cover. Carefree plant that always looks its best.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Origanum libanoticum

From the middle East (Syria, Lebanon) this hop flowered species of Origanum has been a stalwart performer in our climate. Low and spreading stems create hop shaped structures that house the little protruding hot pink flowers. The hops are mostly light green but can take on pink tints. They are fully pendulous and the best way to display this plant is to site it on the edge of a precipice or wall or from the side of a container. To 8″ tall and 2′ wide when happy. Rich, well drained soil with light summer water. Begins blooming in May and continues unabated to September. One of the parents of several popular hybrids but we like the straight species quite a bit- it seems tougher. Graceful. Dies to a very low mound of foliage in winter. Cut back the previous seasons dead stems in early spring. Cold hardy and very showy.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Origanum x ‘Bristol Cross’

Unusual hybrid that has created some striking effects for an ornamental oregano. Distinctly upright stems to 2′ tall, beginning in June groups of up and outwards facing pink small hope like structures bear tiny violet pink flowers. Bloom goes on virtually for months and even when officially done these “hops” remain and change to a deep madder red. A large plant with dozens of upright stems bearing these remnants of flowers is really cool. Full sun and rich, well drained soil. Consistent light watering. Detach the whole stem from the base as a long lasting unusual cut flower. Dies to a low rosette of leaves in winter. Cut back the dead remaining upright stems in spring. Cold hardy. Photo credit: Grace Peterson- thanks Grace.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Origanum x ‘Xera Cascade’

A chance hybrid announced itself in our nursery with these insanely long hop flowered blooms. A low spreading perennial with distinctively blue foliage. In summer many, many stems emerge bearing clusters of flowers. They are shaped like long skinny hop fruits with tiny violet flowers that protrude through the layers of the hop structure. That structure is remarkable. Taking on purple and blue tints it begins to elongate and doesn’t stop until its fully 4″ long. They come in multitudes- this plant lives to bloom. Full sun and rich, well drained soil with light summer water. To 1′ tall and 2 wide in a season. The floral display goes on well into fall. Place near a wall where it will happily cascade. Excellent in large containers. Hardy and easy to grow. Cut back old material in early spring. A new low batch of foliage will already be present.

Xera Plants Introduction.

Photo credit: Chris Hembree

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Akebono’

An exceptional Tea Olive that we love. New growth emerges pink before changing to lacquer white and finally deep green. This period of transition lasts for months and is far showier than the small white flowers that cluster at the leaf axils in autumn. They do, however, emit a sweet perfume that is detectable for many yards. Great cold hardiness for a broad leaved evergreen enduring temps below 0ºF with no harm. Tolerates subfreezing wind and would be a fantastic and showy hedge to block the east wind. To 7′ tall in 7′ years eventually reaching small tree size. Full sun to part shade in average to enriched soil where there is never standing water in summer. Tolerates clay soils on slopes and it is best with about 3 deep soaks per summer once well established. Mulch when planting. Avoid reflected heat. Moderately deer resistant. Blooms on old wood. Prune if needed AFTER blooming has ended. Naturally dense habit. As the shrub matures the leaves which are  mildly prickly in youth change to smooth edged entire leaves. Pretty, tough, dynamic shrub. Japan.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Goshiki’

Wonderful, useful, well scaled variegated hardy Tea Olive that is also incredibly hardy to cold. To 4′ x 4′ in 8 years this slow growing dense shrub has new leaves that emerge tinted pink, mostly cream and then settles to green leaves with splashes of cream. Excellent appearance year round. Great shrub where subfreezing winds are brutal. In October to November the tiny white flowers cluster around the leaf stems and crowd the twigs- they emit a sweet perfume detectable quite far away on mild days. Good deer resistance when established. Average to enriched, well drained soil. Light summer water. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. Very drought tolerant when established. Pretty.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: , ,  |  Foliage season:


Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Purpureus’

Remarkable form of the holly leaf tea olive with new growth that emerges a deep purple black. It settles to dark green in summer on a large growing shrub to 8′ x 8′ in 7 years. Full sun to very light shade in all soils that drain well. Very drought adapted when established. Mature shrubs bear masses of tiny white flowers in the leaf axils in October-November that cast a sweet perfume. Excellent cold hardiness. This is one of the few broad leaf evergreens that is perfectly hardy to the subfreezing wind of the gorge. Troutdale, this shrubs for you. Great hedge as well as specimen. Flowers occur on wood from the previous year- prune in winter after flowering.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Rotundifolius’

A really cool looking broadleaved evergreen shrub with thick glossy leaves that are essentially square with undulate (wavy) margins. Dense growing shrub that can get quite large without pruning intervention. In October to November masses of tiny white flowers cast fragrance in the autumn air. Full sun to part shade in well drained soil of average fertility. No summer water necessary when established. Excellently adapted to our climate. Makes a novel hedge or a pretty specimen. Extraordinarily cold hardy – below 0ºF. 8′ x 8′ in 10 years.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Sasaba’

We adore this wickedly armed evergreen shrub. Its a piece of pure architecture. The sharply pointed leaves jut out like blades and are deep glossy green year round. Excellent, interesting evergreen for screen or specimen. Totally cold hardy- excellent performance in blasting subfreezing winds from the Gorge. Rounded, upright shrub to 9′ tall and 6′ wide in 8 years. In autumn the stems of older wood are crowded with tiny white flowers that emit a sweet perfume. Bloom Sept.-Nov. and sometimes later. The fragrance carries quite a distance on mild days. Light water to establish then completely drought tolerant in average, well drained soil. Also accepts the regular irrigation of borders. Good bet where deer are a menace. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. Great barrier hedge.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Osmanthus x burkwoodii

An iron clad shrub for western Oregon. It endures heavy clay soils, summer drought and the coldest temperatures we can expect with no harm. Dapper evergreen shrub with handsome matte green leaves. In February and March masses of small tubular white fragrant flowers crowd the stems and emit the perfume of vanilla. Very drought tolerant but adaptable to regular irrigation as well. Avoid permanently wet sites. To 7′ x 7′ in 7 years. Tolerates subfreezing wind and is useful as a hedge/windbreak in areas exposed to gorge outflow. Blooms on wood from the previous season prune- if needed after flowering. Tolerates quite a bit of shade. Very old specimens turn into exotic looking evergreen trees with umbrella shaped clouds of foliage.AKA Burkwood Tea Olive or Burkwood Osmanthus.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Oxalis oregana ‘Klamath Ruby’

Far and away our most vigorous clone of our native Oregon Sorrel. So named for the bright red underside of the leaves. In spring and sporadically into summer pure white flowers peek over the foliage. This is a fast colonizing plant that goes by underground stolons and it can cover several feet in a year. In time it will cover anything in part shade to shade in rich, hummus laden, moisture retentive soil. Piles up to about 6″ deep in no time. This form is decidedly evergreen. Use for wild areas  to obstruct smaller weed growth- under decks, shady glens, other areas too dark for plants to grow. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Oxalis oregana ‘Select Pink’

Not the most original cultivar name but its aptly descriptive. Vigorous evergreen ground cover with dramatic hot pink flowers for weeks in spring. Spreads by underground stolons in rich, fertile, woodland conditions with regular summer water. To 4″ high and spreading many feet across shortly (in ideal conditions) . Part shade to shade. Very easy native perennial to grow. This is the second most vigorous Oxalis o. clone that we have behind ‘Klamath Ruby’. Simple pink flowers are pretty and rise up just above the foliage. AKA Redwood Sorrel or Oregon Sorrel. Long lived. Edible. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Oxalis oregana ‘Wintergreen’

A GREAT PLANT PICK. This staunchly evergreen form of our native sorrel has deep green leaves marked with a silver chevron on each leaflet and large pink flowers in spring. Creeps to form an inpenetrable ground cover. To just 4″ tall but spreading to several feet wide within several years. Spreads underground by traveling stolons. A great native small scale ground cover for part shade to even dense shade. Regular summer water is beneficial but not necessary once the plant is up and going. Very easy to grow climate adapted evergreen perennial ground cover. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Papaver miyabeanum

A poppy with chartreuse green flowers? Yes it exists. From a small rosette of blue green leaves a continuous supply of large flowers from May to August. The flowers are supported by 4″ stems and virtually glow against the blue foliage- also when backlit by the sun. Full sun and RICH, well drained soil with regular summer water. Excellent for a solitary ledge in a rock garden or in containers. Do not let this plant be crowded by others. It will die, instead leave it out in the open and give it the good stuff.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Papaver pilosum ssp. spicatum

One of our very favorite perennials and not often seen in these parts. Turkish Spike poppy bucks the rest of the genus by bearing flowers along a tall spike much like a hollyhock. The furry gray spikes and buds erupt to reveeal HUGE 4″ ruffly glowing pastel apricot orange flowers. They start at the top of the spike and move down. To 2′ tall and forming multiple  spikes from a basal rosette of handsome, furry scalloped leaves. Everything about this perennials is regal. Full sun and RICH, well drained soil that retains moisture. Regular summer irrigation. Clumps expand with time Flowers appear in late spring to mid summer. Strong deer resistance. Winter deciduous. Borders- the lush life.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Pennisetum spatheolatum

Veldt grass from South Africa has easily turned into one of our favorite ornamental grasses. Spreads to form bright green evergreen foliage that rises to 20″ tall and spreads several feet wide. From late spring to early autumn a continuous supply of 3′ – 4′ stems that have a catkin like inflorescence at the tip. It begins white and slowly turns to to tan. They wave gracefully in the wind and point in every direction from the clump. Immensely graceful grass that has an incredibly long season of interest. Rich, well drained soil with little summer water once established. Remains good looking through winter. Cold hardy and easy for full sun. Creates and excellent instant meadow effect. Evergreen. Moderate deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Phacelia bolanderi

Native perennial with a comfy sophisticated look. In the wild it occupies the land just up the flood plain from rivers in part shade and rich moist soil. Its also found just up on the first bench of land past the beach where it grows among native Cow Parsley and Salal. Under dry conditions it simply  goes summer dormant. Large felted leaves form a dome from the top of which pale blue outward facing flowers appear in late spring to summer. To 16″ tall and as wide in part shade and well drained soil. This plant improves under cultivation.  Light summer moisture or none when established. Native in the central and southern Oregon coast range with a disjunct population in Grays County, Washington. One of our showiest Phacelias and most garden worthy. Winter deciduous. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Phacelia californica

Scorpion weed is a beautiful native perennial found on rocky slopes/ hillsides/road cuts throughout California and western Oregon. Handsome corrugated trifoliate leaves are silver and have a pointed tip. In May-July curled flower inflorescences arise unfurling as they bloom to reveal rows of mauve/blue flowers. To 2′ tall in bloom it forms a handsome dome of evergreen foliage to 14″ across. The leaves are the most striking and conspicuous feature of this plant. Pollinators adore the flowers and its especially important for native bees. Full sun to very light shade, average, well drained soil. Light summer water.  Excellent in the front of borders. Wonderful bold contrast with other fine leaved silver beauties- it even shines with lavender. As you hike throughout the mountainous parts west of the Cascade Crest the incredibly handsome leaves are sure to catch your eye. Easy to grow and perfectly climate adapted. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Phygelius x rectus ‘Peach Trombone’

We selected this Cape Fuchsia for its compact habit and profuse display of pendant soft yellow to orange to red tubular flowers. To 3′ x 4′ and spreading it begins blooming in May and continues through September. Removing spent flower spikes will encourage more. Full sun and rich, moisture retentive soil for a plant that needs room- spreads underground by stolons. Do not plant delicate plants in the vicinity of this perennial, instead match vigor with vigor. Light summer water to none when established. Though water enhances bloom. Loved by hummingbirds and pollinators too. Great landscape plant. Cut back hard in mid-spring to refresh the plant and spur new blooming wood. Semi-evergreen.

Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Pinus sabiniana

Gray Pine or Foothill Pine native almost exclusively to the mountains of California- but there are several outlying native populations in Douglas, Josephine and Jackson, Counties in Oregon so we can claim it as our own as well.  Known as the tree that casts no shade, its almost completely true as the long gray needles allow almost all light through. Large pine tree with gray foliage- usually forks about 1/2 way up into two main trunks, these are buttressed to support the huge cones which can weigh 5lbs or more.  Excellent performance in the Willamette Valley where many are seen around old farm houses and older neighborhoods. Perfectly hardy to cold in our climate and incredibly drought adapted. In fact it shuns all irrigation and is ideal for hot dry locations. Grows very fast in youth, settles down a little with age. Its ultimate height is around 35′-45′ in our climate. A smokey, silvery, shadeless skyline tree. Oregon native plant.

 

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Plagiobothrys figuratus var. figuratus

Fragrant Popcorn flower is a wildflower limited to western Oregon with its largest populations in the Willamette Valley. This hardy annual is an inhabitant of wet meadows and vernally wet fields. Closely related to forget me nots (Myosotis) this plant erupts into waves of pure white flowers with a tiny yellow eye. The flowers foam between grasses and shrubs for several weeks in late May to July. To 10″ tall unfurling flowers on a plant of small stature. Excellent performance in rain gardens and a very reliable re-seeding plant. Full sun and water potted plants to establish. Self sown seedlings get by with no supplemental irrigation. Excellent with Rosa nutkana, Camas, Ranunculus occidentale. Moderately deer resistant. On warm summer days a field in full bloom emits a sweet perfume.Very good performance in containers and is often superseded in its habitat by Downingia. Excellent native pollinator flower. Especially important to native bumbles.  Oregon native plant. 

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Polemonium carneum

Our native pink Jacob’s Ladder is a great plant for gardens. Hailing from valleys adjacent to the Cascades as well as the coastal strip the finely divided foliage of this clumping perennial is attractive but enhanced when the clusters of very pretty flowers open the palest pink aging to lavender over several days. Full sun to part shade in rich moisture retentive soil. To 28″ tall and somewhat spreading. Blooms for an extended period from April to June. Summer drought will bring dormancy but a little bit of water keeps it green. Great tolerance to dry clay soils and it persists in conditions that would end lesser perennials. Mixes well at the margins of woodlands or the front of perennial borders. Even in its habitat it tends to flop, or rather lean on its neighbors. Expect this and use it to an advantage. The softly colored flowers will wind into other plants playfully and you can achieve really cool and wild appearing vignettes. Very good in concert with native Geranium oreganum as they bloom simultaneously.  A really pretty native perennial. Adaptable to heavy clay soils. Soars in rich, amended soils and can be quite a bit larger than I’ve listed.  Fairly good cut flower.  Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Polystichum polyblepharum

Immensely handsome glossy evergreen fern with intricate large leaves Forms a large rosette up to 2 1/2′ wide and just 14″ tall. Small hairs line the stems and give this fern its specific epithet of blepharum – eyelashes. Known as Eyelash fern for this trait. Full shade to part shade in rich, moisture retentive soil. Regular summer water. Mass as a shady ground cover  or bed underneath old established shrubs. Year round good looking with no damage from the hardest winters. Easy. High deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Primula vulgaris ‘Francesca’

Not only does this odd primrose have truly grass green flowers – each with a central yellow eye, this form of common primrose is also the longest blooming of the species as well as a much easier long lived perennial. Frilly, almost semi-double flowers seem to last for months- remaining bright and fresh through almost all of spring. Makes a great little unique cut flower and the flower color mixes so well in the spring garden. Pair with the blue flowers of Omphalodes verna or even the white form ‘Alba’ as they bloom at the same time for the same length of time. Regular water in rich, moisture retentive soil. Regular summer water is a requirement.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Prunus mume ‘Kobai’

Sophisticated winter blooming tree that we love for its incredibly sweet spicy scented flowers.  Double pink flowers are conspicuous and perched perfectly on the green twigs of this asian flowering apricot. Flowers appear in December in mild years as late as February in the coldest. Flowers last forever in the cool winter air. Each spicily scented flower has a prominent boss of white stamens. Its the details man. Flowers are hardy to around 20ºF- closed buds are substantially hardier and will unfurl when the weather warms. Moderately fast growing tree to 18′ x12′ in 10 years. Appreciates deep, rich soil and definitely weekly summer water in its first few years. Fall color is pale yellow. Inedible ornamental fruits often follow the blossoms. Japan.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Quercus chrysolepis

Canyon live oak is a vastly underused, beautiful evergreen native tree. Found from Lane county, Oregon south through California, slight parts of Nevada around Lake Tahoe and sporadically in Arizona and even New Mexico. This venerable tree is found on the steepest slopes of canyons and mountain ridges. In Oregon it represents the northern most native Live Oak or evergreen oak in North America. Leaves are glossy army green on the the top with a conspicuous furry gold underside. This is a rugged, tough tree that should be used in both gardens and as a street tree. In the Alameda neighborhood in Portland there is an ancient specimen to 60′ tall and wide with a large trunk. This heritage tree was reportedly brought to the city from southern Oregon via horse and wagon. Slow growing in youth it picks up speed exponentially several years after planting. To 40′ x 20′ in 30 years with a broad spreading crown. In the wild it often forms a gnarled multi-trunked rounded outline. Its very possible to train this tree to a single trunk/leader to extend the crown skyward. Extraordinarily cold hardy enduring temperatures slightly below 0ºF with no difficulty. The large acorns are born in a showy golden hued furry cups- and are produced profusely in banner years. Water to establish for the first season then none in subsequent years. Full sun. Beautiful, native Oak that we cherish at Xera. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Quercus hypoleucoides

Silver Leaf Oak from Arizona is a favorite tree at Xera. Tall, rounded evergreen tree with skinny but thick leaves that are sage green on top and silver white on the underside. Its handsome all the time and even prettier when the gold catkins protrude from the foliage in spring. Naturally develops a straight trunk. Fast growing tree in our climate to 35′ in 12 years. Casts dense shade but tolerates limited summer water. Extraordinarily  cold hardy. It has endured subzero readings in Eugene without injury and I even encountered one in a garden in Denver. The leaves were kind of toasted from the previous winters -17ºF(!) but it was obviously thriving. Native to the mountains of SE Arizona at very high elevations and that translates to LOVE for our climate. Exceptional leaf form and shape. Be aware that in time this tree can cast quite dense shade. Wonderful on hot summer days but also inhibiting sun loving gardening. Makes you think. Wonderfully pest and disease resistant foliage- it always looks good.

Photo credit: Amy Campion

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Rohdea japonica

Sacred Lily from Japan is a stellar evergreen perennial that may not be dynamic and changing but it takes horrible dry shade and still looks good ( or the same ) year round. Rosettes that are somewhat elongated with scooped scrappy deep green arching leaves. Tiny white/green flowers in summer turn to bright red showy berries in fall and winter. Very slow growing for shade to dense shade and a champion in dry shade. To 1′ tall x 2′ wide Unmolested by slugs and snails. Light summer water. Takes sun but will turn yellow- not pretty. Japanese style gardens, overhangs, under outside stairwells. Cold hardy.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Romanzoffia californica

Mist Maidens are an integral part of spring in western Oregon. These delicate looking beauties are actually iron tough. Clouds of white flowers sway above rubbery scalloped foliage beginning in early March and continuing to early June. They have the light fragrance of vanilla. Hot weather shuts them down and they quickly retreat to their bulbous roots to wait out summer in dormancy. Once established they require little interevention from humans. Let them romp around in the spring border with such similar perennials as Primula sieboldii and Viola corsica. Just don’t forget that they are there when they magically disappear.  To 10″ tall and about as wide. In favored circumstances this Oregon native will happily self sow. Pretty and fresh as spring. Found locally in the coast range in Washington and Yamhill county. Once much more widespread. Its common name is derived from its predilection for growing at the edge of seasonal water falls.  Pretty leaves, pretty flowers, easy to please.  Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: ,


Rosa ‘Radway Sunrise’

Years ago I was searching through old and obscure rose catalogs with one goal in mind. Find a single rose that changes color after it opens. The idea was to mimic Rosa x mutablilis  but in different color shades or on a hardier plant. Man did we score. If we could grow only one rose this would be it. ‘Radway Sunrise’ produces large single flowers in clusters that open pale yellow- change to orange and arrive at strong carmine pink. A brilliant multicolored effect on a strong growing virus free and disease resistant rose. Typically grows to 7′ tall in a single season and is amenable to life as a climber too. Rapid re-bloom all summer. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular summer water. Prune this shrub rose hard in mid-February. The fragrant flowers will form hips that ripen in autumn. Great, great rose. On its own roots.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


This large hybrid shrub rose was a spontaneous volunteer at the Bellevue Botanical Garden in Washington. Big, soft green pinnate leaves are almost floppy. Beginning in May and repeatedly through summer 4″ wide rosy pink flowers with raspberry red stamens appear. They age slowly to light lavender in a few days. The huge single flowers are  often followed by large orange/then red hips. Each flower is so enormous that it bends the branches considerably when the flower is open. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Wonderful, informal, and showy shrub to 6′ x 6′ in a season. Blooms on wood from the current season. Prune heavily in early spring. Not bothered by most diseases, locate with good air circulation to stymie powdery mildew which it can be afflicted in cool, wet springs. Cool, floppy, cut rose with a slight fragrance. Thorny but not deadly. Regular water in rich soil. Add at least one handful of all purpose organic fertilizer in spring and again in summer. This rose is propagated on its own roots. Give this large, spectacular rose room to spread out.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome:  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Ruschia pulvinaris

More of a shrub this branched ice plant species is one of the easiest to grow in our climate. To 10″ tall and as wide in a circular ball. The succulent gray foliage is densely attached to and obscures the stems. In early summer for several weeks hot pink feather daisy like flowers cover the plant. They open in full sun and close when its dim- including cloudy days. Loved by pollinators. Very pretty evergreen succulent shrublet for rock gardens, gravel gardens, slopes. Light summer water but completely drought adapted when established and growing. Very showy in containers, troughs. Double dig the soil and incorporate oxygen before planting. Avoid compacted soils. Very pretty.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Saxafraga x geum ‘Dentata’

Really cool evergreen Saxafrage that has deep green spoon shaped leaves that are strongly serrated. The serrations are remarkably symmetrical and give the plant a very architectural appeal. In late spring wiry stems to 10″ supply clouds of small white flowers. If you look closely each flower is adorned with yellow and red polka dots. Spreads moderately fast to form large, dense colonies in part shade to shade in rich, well drained soil with regular moisture in summer. Avoid blasting sun and dust dry soil. Not hard to grow in a cool position. Very hardy with a great year round appearance. Excellent lining woodland paths or as a pool of cool leaves beneath established shrub. Very good in winter containers. Easy to pick up and move if you need a new patch. Lovely.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Scutellaria suffrutescens

Texas Cherry Skullcap is a wildflower with a mission. To bloom – not just a little but in sheets for all of summer with no supplemental irrigation. And I’ll be damned if it doesn’t do that. Forms lows domes to 5″ high by 1′ wide and is smothered in cherry pink flowers from June well into autumn. Rich to average well drained soil and occasional  summer irrigation. Cut back in spring after new growth has commenced. Full all day sun, reflected heat and not much else. Long lived and virtually carefree. One of the best surprises in my garden of the past 10 years. Excellent perennial that survives, grows and blooms prolifically with no summer water. Even in the drought and heat of 2021. Extraordinarily adapted to baking hellstrips.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’

Immensely useful, if rambunctious sedum that glows in vivid gold to chartreuse. The needle like leaves are vivid and line trailing stems. The stems root where they hit the ground- good local solution for erosion. Fast growing plant that spreads indefinitely in sun to quite a bit of shade. So easy to grow that I suggest you plant it in AVERAGE well drained soil. No need for amendments because the truth is once you have this plant you will always have it. Evergreen. Easy to remove from unwanted places. Simply pick it up off the ground and dispose. Or move it. I use this plant as a fast low water place holder when I’m deciding what to put in next. To plant simply toss it on the ground and water. You can bury it a little but its really not necessary. Avoid strongly compacted soil. Yellow flowers in early spring. Nice ground cover under trees. Hardy. Oh, so hardy.

My Favorites

Plant type: , ,  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Selaginella braunii

Arborvitae fern, but it isn’t a fern at all! Actually its a really big spike moss! A moss with stems and arrow shaped fronds like a fern. To 10″ tall and forming a mounding colony in time. Bright green summer color is replaced by russet red and light brown with winter cold. Spreads slowly underground and new “fronds” unfurl out and up. With great age you’ll get a decent patch. So damn pretty for woodlands in the shade in rich, well drained soil that retains moisture- perpetually moist is what it wants. Its best home is in containers where it adds both a tough of doily green but 3D tiered layers as well.  Regular summer moisture. Slow and easy does it. Its a moss! Can you dig it? Evergreen.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Sesleria autumnalis ‘Campo de Azul’

An autumn moor grass with distinctive differences. Very blue upright, stiff foliage forms a large expanding clump. In mid summer through autumn (and beyond) 18″ straight vertical stems support gray/black flowers frosted with light yellow pollen. Excellent appearance year round for an evergreen grass to 1′ tall and 2′ wide in several seasons. Well drained average to enriched soil. Light, consistent summer water in full sun. Excellent massed, plant on 2′ centers. Flowers slowly decay over winter and spent stems may be cut away. Refrain from cutting this plant back to the ground. Winter damage will be covered quickly by new growth in late winter to early spring. Establishes quickly. Cold hardy below 0ºF. Native to Italy/Croatia- its adapted well to a summer dry climate. Nice looking grass.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Sesleria autumnalis ‘Campo Verde’

Crazy cool grass that is handsome year round- not entering dormancy in winter and they bloom on compact plants for several months. This mediterranean native grass forms lose but not unkempt bunches of arching evergreen foliage. The floral spikes rise another several inches above the foliage for a complicated texture. Full sun, well drained soil, little water once established. To 14″ tall and 20″ wide. 1′ tall in bloom. Very drought tolerant and does not really go through a down time remaining the same aesthetically all year. Accepts regular irrigation with excellent drainage.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Sisyrinchium ‘Quaint and Queer’

Sweet little blue eyed grass with a penchant for being different. Eschewing the purple and yellow and blue flowers commonly assigned to this genus this little freak puts out simple flowers with petals that alternate soft tan and purple. Its a groovy combination and adds a wild flower flare on long thin stalks to 18″ tall. Forms increasing clumps of grassy blue/green foliage. Deciduous in winter. Full sun and rich to average well drained soil with light but consistent summer water when established. A good sized clump can measure about 10″ across after several years. A charming perennial that we have found is excellently adapted to the open mindedness of the west coast as well as climate. Easy. Gay Iris relatives are few and far between. Treasure them. Moderate deer resistance.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Stipa gigantea ‘Little Giant’

As if a wonderful grass couldn’t get any better this smaller version thrills us with so many more applications. A low clump of arching dense dark green evergreen foliage has a nice presence year round. In spring and continuing all throughout summer into autumn 3′-4′ spikes terminate in clouds of metallic golden awns. They sparkle in full sun and sway in the breeze- but are determinedly upright. The basal clump of leaves spreads slowly to 2′ wide in 5 years. Full sun and well drained soil- bud adaptable to anything but a bog. Evergreen. Cut back spent flowers in winter- or let them stay and wave around beckoning birds and wildlife. Moderate deer resistance. Little to no summer water when established.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Tanecetum densum ‘Amani’

You can’t resist the finely divided feathery nearly white foliage of this great small scale ground cover. Foliage to 4″ tall and spreading to 2′ wide in full sun and well drained soil. Light summer water. Small flowers lacking petals have a center of off white/gold in early summer. Excellent performance on slopes as well as rock gardens.  Evergreen. Loves life in the hellstrip.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Tolmiea menziesii ‘Taff’s Gold’

An exceptional variegated form of our native “pigaback” plant that is excellent as a groundcover in dense to light shade. Vigorous and evergreen it will spread to 4′ wide in 2 years but stay only 1′ tall. Very easy to grow, works well under established Rhododendrons. Pretty, but not conspicuous brown flowers. Regular water but will take drought if in the shade. Easy, indispensible native plant.  Forms new plants directly from the center of each leaf. Cool trick. Also grown as a houseplant. Good in containers. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: , ,  |  Foliage season:


Trifolium wormskioldii

Springbank Clover. Fascinating perennial clover that was once widespread in wet areas of the Willamette Valley and is now found in restricted sites there but is much more prevalent on the coast and east of the Cascades.  A pretty spreading spring wildflower with heads of brilliant magenta/purple flowers. Mainly in spring but also in summer if wet. To 4″ tall it can be up to 2′ wide in favorable conditions. Though mostly restricted to seeps and wet areas now it once made life under native white oaks and there indigenous people would use it as a food source. The creeping green stems root where they touch the ground. Stems were harvested and steamed as a vegetable and they replanted as they harvested the remaining stems ensuring another crop. Not a long lived perennial 3-5 years but it sets copious seed. Wet sites in moisture retentive soil. Mainly riparian in habitat.  It can dry considerably in summer and still thrive. But regular water is what it wants. Fun plant to grow that has lost a LOT of its native range. In habitat it is best seen on the wet cliffs adjacent to the beach. Great pollinator plant. Easily overwhelmed by invasive exotics.   Oregon native plant. 

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Trillium kurabayashii

One of Oregon’s greatest wildflowers. This native of the Siskiyous and the SW part of the state makes an outstanding garden plant. Ours are divisions from well marked leaves and flowers with a deep maroon/black hue. To 18″ tall in bloom it responds readily to rich, humus filled soil with regular summer water. In very dry conditions it will go happily summer dormant. And it usually does anyway by the end of the hot season. The black and green leaves are dramatic but a  great collar to the tall upright dark flowers. Blooms appear in Portland in April/May and last for weeks. Part shade to shade- avoid blasting hot sun- it will grow in sun but go dormant very quickly. Roots very deep into the ground- difficult to move once established so pick its home carefully. Multiplies into a substantial patch with good care. One of our favorite native wildflowers. Limited quantities. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color: ,  |  Foliage season:


Vancouveria chrysantha

Rare perennial Siskiyou Inside-out-Flower is a much more drought tolerant version of our locally native Vancouveria hexandra (Inside out flower). This yellow flowered species tolerates extreme dry shade and colonizes even compacted dry soils to create a handsome ground cover. The delicate looking interestingly shaped leaves create a soft mound of shapes in cool green and edged slightly in red. In April-June 20″ wiry spikes suspend small downward pointing flowers- they appear to float above the foliage reminding me of a group of fireflies. (Wish we had those). Mostly evergreen if temperatures stay above about 15ºF.  Basically this is our version of Epimedium (to which it is related) but with more tolerance for summer drought. To 8″ tall and spreading to several feet wide in richer, moisture retentive soil. Light summer water increases growth.  This is an extraordinarily elegant native that should find a happy home in gardens too. Part shade to full shade. Not bothered by pests. Excellent perennial under large shrubs or within tree roots. In the wild it is the understory plant to Arctostaphylos, Rhododendron, Vaccinium, Notholithocarpus densiflorus var. echinoides.  Associate perennials were Oxalis oreganus and Mianthemum as well as viola semperivrens- Redwood violet. Easy community to replicate in your garden. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Verbena rigida

Vigorous and floriferous perennial Verbena for tough areas. Spreading by underground stolons in rich to average well drained soil this deep purple flowering perennial covers ground in short order. Full sun and light summer water when established to lengthen bloom time. Even then it begins flowering in June and continue unabated for two months. To 2′ tall and 4′ wide. Give it room to spread and do not pair with delicate neighbors. Hellstrips, Insanely hot and dry south facing hillsides. Freezes to the ground in winter- returns from the ground when truly warm weather arrives. Moderately deer resistant.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Viburnum henryi

Rare but wonderful evergreen viburnum that has pretty elongated leaves held symmetrically on thick stems. The growth habit is branching in tiers. This displays the lovely foliage as well as the cones of white summer flowers at the branch tip. These turn into red and then black berries eagerly consumed by wildlife. To 9′ tall and 8′ wide in wide vase shape. Part shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Takes very dry conditions when established. Extraordinarily cold hardy to below 0ºF with no ill effects. Moderately fast growing. SW China.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Viola x cornuta ‘Xera’s Mix’

We’ve had a really good time selecting the most distinct flower colors of this mix of Violas. Brown, taupe, blue, gray, purple, are  among the colors in this vigorous strain. These reseed with abandon and will occupy all kinds of niches in a garden. Containerized plants seem to cast seed when you are least aware. They generally germinate in winter and bloom in spring before setting seed and going to sleep for summer heat. Fragrance is another aspect in our selection. You can’t have Violas without fragrance.  In autumn our winter mix has been chosen to handle the very worst cold and snow. Full sun to very light shade. Very easy and satisfying spring and autumn/winter extravaganza. They make sweetly scented, delightful bouquets.  Xera Plants Introduction.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Vitex agnus-castus ‘Sensational’

Excellent California selection of Chaste tree with thicker, bluer flowers. Large growing shrub with aromatic finely divided leaves in mid-July in PDX spires of blue flowers erupt from each branch tip. It remains in bloom for 3-4 weeks. And if you remove spent flowers more will appear. Full sun and poor to average well drained soil. No summer water when established. Attains tree-like status with great age. May be pruned back hard in spring to contain the ultimate size. Blooms on new wood. Long lived and hardy below 0ºF. Leaves appear late in spring- often not until mid-May. Be patient. Loved by pollinators and bumble bees specifically. A shrub in full bloom will be a haze of drunken bumbles who after a day of working will often fall asleep in the flowers of this shrub. Tolerates the hottest sites and is very long lived.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Woodwardia fimbriata

Our native Giant Chain Fern that occupies specific spots in seeps randomly from CA to BC. Large pendant and trailing 3′ long glossy fronds form huge rosettes. Usually occupying permanently wet seeps on shady hillsides in cool places. The entire plant may be up to 5′ across. Evergreen but it benefits greatly from some early spring tidying of spent and aging old leaves. Part shade to shade in rich well drained soil with regular consistent moisture for the best look. Highly deer resistant. We’re honored to grow this, one of our most spectacular native ferns. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: