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This is a very handsome and dependable hardy Agapanthus bred in Ireland.  It forms a spreading clump and in mid summer 3′ tall stems support multiple pendant midnight blue flowers.. Full sun and rich soil. Add a handful of lime to the planting hole. Our soils are acidic and this perennial likes neutral (7) Alkaline (sweet) soils to perform at its best. You can also plant it next to a concrete sidewalk which will also give it the alkalinity that is craves. The clump of scrappy mid green leaves is shorter than most varieties and maintains a tidy plant both before and AFTER bloom so it makes an exemplary garden and landscape perennial. Regular water is crucial through the bloom period, July /August when flowering ends and you cut away the dead stalks it remains good looking until it totally disappears in mid autumn. Irish and UK Agapanthus appear to have much greater cold tolerance than American selections,  they wait to emerge until all threat of a freeze has passed. Very cold hardy easy to grow wonderful pendant tower of cobalt blue. The truss of flowers is very large and showy. Good cut flower, loved by pollinators too. Limited quantities. One of the finest lily of the niles for our gardens.

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We’re intent on expanding our offerings of our cold hardy native Hairy Manzanita. This form we found in the Hood River Valley and it was conspicuous to us for several reasons. The plant which has long pointed blue leaves was exceptionally disease resistant. It also was tolerant of quite a bit of shade as well. Hairy Manzanita from this part of the state is exceptionally cold tolerant. It will happily live on both sides of the Cascades. The long blue/gray foliage is perpendicular to large stems. The bark becomes deep mahogany and glossy with age. Best in unimproved native soils. To establish water it regularly once a week until you see good new growth then set it free. Drought adapted. To 5′ x 6′ a large shrub that grows quickly to its ultimate size. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Always good air circulation. The very early spring flowers are pure white and large on this cultivar. Russet berries that follow attract wildlife. Wonderful shrub, easier to grow than ‘Wolf Creek’.  Cold hardy well below 0ºF.  Oregon native plant.

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This exceptional form of hairy manzanita we discovered on the north side of Mount Hood. The large foliage is distinctively blue and is held perpendicular to the stems. In very late winter to early spring pearl pink/white flowers decorate the branch tips and appeal to both hummingbirds and native bees. A large rounded shrub to 6′ x 8′ forming a wide dome. Its best attribute is its distinctive deep mahogany glossy bark which  contrasts with the blue foliage. Russet berries follow the flowers and are consumed by wildlife. Full sun to very high overhead shade in average to poor unimproved soil. Water once a week to establish, when new growth begins taper off then drought adaptation is exceptional. Its also exceptionally hardy to cold to at least -15ºF and is as happy in the Willamette Valley as Central Oregon. Moderately fast growing. Disease resistant, Best to grow Arctostaphylos columbiana as lean as possible. Give it just enough water to establish and then only bark/chip mulch.  A very pretty cultivar that is one of our favorite manzanitas. Oregon native plant

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Red Maids. A lovely native hardy annual for the sunniest spots. Rosettes of semi-succulent  paddle shaped leaves are about 5″ wide.  Found primarily in poor soils in hot sunny locations. Thats where you find it in habitat, the sides of gravel roads, rocky hillsides and good drainage. Beginning in May a constant procession of 1/3″ hot magenta flower are showy when they open in full sun. Native primarily to western Oregon its found through out the west. Resows reliably especially in gravelly soil. Calandrinia should be watered when they  are planted from containers just to get it established. Self sown plant are incredibly drought adapted in our climate. This plant literally grows from desert to the mountains. Loved by a lot of pollinator its especially attractive to butterflies.  Great in containers as well. Shocking magenta pink. Oregon native plant.

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Most of us associate Camellias with large shrubs to small trees but this is a true dwarf and it fits in very small sites.  Dwarf (slow growing) shrub with glossy green foliage and in autumn to mid-winter a constant supply of semi double rosy red flowers. To 4′ x 4′ in 10 years. Nice looking shrub that is an exceptionally heavy bloomer. This sport of  ‘Shi Shi Gashira’ which is a dark pink and very popular fall blooming Camellia. ‘Dwarf Shi shi’s ‘ flowers are closer to red than its sport parent. Full sun to very light shade. Occasional deep soaks in summer aids flower bud set.  Takes dry conditions when very established. Water regularly to establish and mulch. Sasanqua Camellias are hardier and bloom more heavily in full hot sun. Good performance at the Oregon coast where most Sasanqua Camellias languish. Not often bothered by deer. The entire floral tube detaches and falls never clinging and turning brown. Limited quantities.

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Not all Sasanqua Camellias are created equally and though they all bloom in autumn to winter some have much studier flowers that are beautiful as well. ‘Kanjiro’ is an ancient Japanese cultivar and to this day it is still one of the finest. The large double dark pink flowers are exceptionally weather tolerant and will even survive freezes into the upper 20’s. Even if flowers are spoiled by frost a seemingly never ending supply of buds replaces the flowers quickly, in fact a this is a natural phenomenon for this shrub. You often get  your best displays right after a freeze when the thaw begins. Otherwise its a non stop procession of flowers from October to December. Large growing evergreen shrub with very handsome dark foliage that is good looking year round. To 10′ tall x 10′ wide in 12 years, it  may be pruned to a much smaller size or espaliered on a wall which will  protect the flowers from the vagaries of weather. Moderately fast growing with regular summer water in full hot sun. Established shrubs are very tolerant of summer drought. Long lived. There is a light earthy fragrance to the flowers. Long long season of bloom. Very nice with Grevillea x ‘Leanne’ for a prolific blooming winter display.

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Fantastically  graceful Camellia of complex parentage. Large spreading and arching Camellia with small glossy leaves and from 1″ distinctly pointed flower buds open masses of 2″ wide yawning flowers. The interior of the pure white flower is decorated with the yellow stamens. Most of the flowers point downward in a dainty pose that adds to this Camellias grace. To 8′ tall x 8′ wide and branching in large divided boughs that give the impression of wings. The intensity of the white flower color is amplified in the darkness of winter. Blooms late January through March. Immensely graceful and floriferous this has none of the strict formal look of most other species. (C. tsaiiC. cuspidata) x C. fraterna )  Luckily this Camellia includes the ultra hardy C. cuspidata and is not tender in the slightest. Flowers are hardy into the upper 20’s and masses of incipient buds means that the show starts again post freeze. The small fluted flowers fall cleanly from the shrub and collect in a pure white carpet. Rich soil with regular irrigation. Takes less water as it gains establishment. Part shade to full sun. A protected location helps the flowers deal with the vagaries of winter weather. Wonderful Camellia that we love at Xera.

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Timber sedge is an evergreen somewhat floppy Carex that is found extensively in western Oregon. It blooms in spring with  thin green spikes and upward facing catkin like flowers. The rich green smooth foliage is distinctively pleated and about 4mm wide. Forms a sprawling clump and will seed around, especially in moist locations. It is ideal under native oaks and firs where it is found in the wild. Often in clear cuts in the Coast range there is a distinct period when this sedge dominates before being succeeded out. Tolerant of full sun to high overhead shade. Best at the edge of a forest with half day sun Light consistent water to establish then you can set it free. Tolerates heavy clay soils well. To 1′ tall in bloom to 18″ wide and never tidy. Fairly good winter appearance but it can be cut back in early spring to refresh. Plant with Carex lepidota and Aster chilense. Oregon native plant.

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Mountain balm, snowbrush,  tobacco brush and var. laevigatus is the western Oregon form of this widespread aromatic evergreen species. Fast growing and not terribly long  lived this shrub has widely dispersed seed that germinates upon disturbance, especially fire. Large glossy aromatic foliage gives away its common names as it emits a sweet balsam some say tobacco fragrance. The heavily veined leaves are large and round and seem to be varnished with this sweet perfume.  Rapid growth to 12′ x 12′ in 10 years. The more fertile the soil the larger and shorter lived this pretty shrub will be. Give it average conditions and no supplemental summer water. In May to early June cones of frothy fragrant white flowers protrude from the glossy foliage. Black seeds follow and they are dispersed explosively as well as eaten by birds. These black seeds can remain dormant for generations until they wake. It is found locally in the northern Willamette valley especially around the Tonquin scablands a kolk remnant of the Bretz flood just south of Portland. Expect a lifespan of about 15 years, more with neglect. Blooms on wood from the previous season prune if needed after blooming in June. This is a large shrub and it will reach its ultimate size very quickly, Give it room. Ultra cold hardy to -5ºF on the west side of the Cascades. This fast growing shrub does not appreciate pot culture, plant from the smallest size possible  Oregon native plant.

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This treasured evergreen to semi evergreen asian dogwood is a wonderful tree for a protected location. New growth is copper colored and retains this hue for quite some time . To 26′ with a strongly pyramidal habit. In early summer true flowers with erupting chartreuse then light yellow very showy bracts.  These are followed by red edible berries that appeal to some and a lot to birds. The bloom period is exceptionally long for a dogwood and it blooms con currently with Korean Dogwood (Cornus kousa) to which it is closely related. Mostly evergreen expect leaves to drop below about 20ºF twig damage does not occur until 10ºF. Definitely site well out of subfreezing east wind. A south or western exposure. Very regal and elegant tree The more protected the location the more evergreen.  This fast growing tree would make an elegant espalier – flowers appear on wood from the previous season. Light, consistent irrigation in average to enriched soil. Himalayan dogwood. Thrives at the cool Oregon coast . Avoid  hot and dry locations..

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Compact hybrid Corokia that has larger leaves that turn from gray to bronze in cold weather. To 4′ x 3′ in 6 years. The upper parts of the stems are more like soft gray rushes before the foliage elongates. In late spring starry bright yellow flowers spangle the older growth. Occasionally its followed by orange berries. Very forgiving shrub that we have actually grown for years. It has good cold hardiness for a Corokia x virgata hybrid and its compact, dense and good looking year round. Avoid the coldest sites, gains cold hardiness with age, protect the smallest plants from temperatures below 20ºF, after several years it will be hardy to the upper single digits. Makes a great sheared hedge and its used for that purpose in its home New Zealand. Great performance at the Oregon coast. Very good in containers. especially winter containers. This shrub has a much more burgundy hue in winter as opposed to the all gray look of Corokia cotoneaster. Easy to grow. This shrub would be good to try where deer are profuse. Its excels in containers in the urban scape of down town.

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The Iris family is enormous and it features members from every continent except Antarctica. This native of higher elevations in Tasmania is a hardy species in a fairly tender genus. AKA Tasmanian Flag, this evergreen perennial forms 8″ tall  narrow leaves forming a clump 1′ wide with time. In late spring to early summer a fairly long show of the most pristine white flowers. They have three prominent petals and surround a center with three tabs each marked with purple, yellow, and black.like an intricate orchid. Very light shade in average to enriched soil with light consistent summer water. The flowers rise on thin stems to 2′ and a clump with many flowers is sublime. Easy to grow- when  flowering is over it leaves a clump of foliage that remains good looking year round. Good pollinator perennial. Not bothered by deer or slugs/snails or anything in general. Mulch with leaves for the first winter for added protection. This is the high elevation form of this perennial and has not been damaged in my garden down to 10ºF for the past 8 years. Rare and fun to grow. Excellent performance at the Oregon coast. Protect from subfreezing wind. Wonderful cut flower.

 

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Western Wallflower is a very widespread biennial or short lived perennial. It occurs from Alaska to nearly Mexico and throughout the west coast. The first season is spent as a rosette of thin undulating leaves. In the second year it extends, forms branches and achieves multiple flower spikes. The species is best described as yellow/orange with some slight variation in these seed grown plants. In Oregon its is widespread but it has all but disappeared from some biomes, the Willamette Valley for instance, a victim of non native invasives. To 22″ tall in bloom. You  may get a third season but it is much less of a show.Best to let this plant set seed and die ensuring a new generation of plants. Leave open disturbed sites for re-sowing.  A gravel mulch will encourage this as well and it appreciates average to enriched soil and light consistent water to establish. The following year it can rely on only what fall from the  sky. Blooms appear for several weeks in late spring. Loved by pollinators with a special draw to butterflies. Common associates in the wild are Dodecatheon hendersonii,  Mitella , Ranunculus occidentalis, Nemophila. Oregon native plant

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Chilean Hazlenut is not a hazelnut at all its a protea. Glossy pinnate leaves are handsome all the time on this evergreen tree. The huge leaves hug the curly ivory colored flowers that stick out perpendicular to the stems. They are about 3″ long. After fertilization these flowers morph into tasty mellow nut like fruits that resemble red/ochre berries.. They are somewhat like Hazelnuts hence the name. Moderately fast growing to 25′ in our climate. It requires a protected location away from subfreezing wind. Excellent on the Oregon coast. The bark is mellow brown and handsome. It can freeze back substantially at 10ºF but recovery in spring is rapid.  This means that this forest tree is almost always a shrub in our climate. Excellent espaliered against a south or west facing wall. Takes some shade but is happier in full sun. Fairly closely related to Macadamias but the nuts aren’t quite as sophisticated. Establish this plant well going into the first winter. Water once a week deeply for the first year. Good container plant that can be moved to a protected location when arctic air threatens. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed after flowering has ended.Prefers acidic soil and do not fertilize with phosphorous or potassium. Proteaceae. Chile/Peru/Argentina

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This is one of Andy’s selections and its an excellent Hebe. Arching in growth with canoe shaped bright green symmetrical foliage . In June and July the entire top third is clad in blue racemes that are thin and fade a little with age. The flowers arrive in profusion and are loved by bees and butterflies. To 30″ tall and eventually forming a dense dome to 3′ wide. Rich to average soil that drains, ideal on a slope. Avoid areas with direct exposure to subfreezing east wind. In those areas that are prone place it out of the wind- a west or south facing aspect. Great plant for courtayards or containers. Blooms are effective for a month or more, then its just a bright green dense evergreen shrub. Excellent performance at the Oregon coast. Light consistent summer irrigation. Mulch after planting. Moderately fast growing.

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Bog deer vetch is a beautiful native perennial found in wet to seasonally wet sites throughout Oregon, but primarily Western Oregon. This rhizomatous perennial erupts from the ground in early spring with pinnate leaves that are deep purple. As the plant extends it changes to dark green and begins to bloom in crowns of pea flowers that are yellow and white. Very pretty. The symmetry of the flowers is especially attractive. To 2′ tall x 3′ wide.  Blooms April to June. Lovely native perennial for boggy sites. Amenable to average culture in  rich soil with regular H20 in summer. Easy to grow long lived perennial for meadows,  swales, vernally wet sites.  Excellent perennial for a rain garden. Takes dry conditions when established and goes deciduous with summer heat.  Competes well with invasive grasses. Possibly deer resistant. Often seen along streams in NW Oregon. Riparian perennial. Oregon native plant.

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This is a delightfully airy evergreen whose variegation definitely enhances the over all look.  A moderately fast growing shrub to 6′ x 3′ in 7  years. Very hardy to cold enduring temperatures near 0ºF with little issues. In spring spidery star shaped cream flowers appear in every branch end. Part shade to high overhead shade but it also does not burn in full sun in our climate, Just make sure that you water it regularly. Established shrubs get by with very little. Aromatic foliage is not palatable to animals and this is a very good bet where deer are a problem. Great shrub for brightening garden corners or lightening up dark shade. Rich to average soil. aka Chinese anise shrub. The flowers have a light odd scent. Not worth repeating and its only pungent up close. Seed pods that form become woody and star shaped,- aka Star Anise. Distinctive upright dense habit. Prune if needed AFTER flowring has ended.

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Himalayan Forget Me Not is a perennial for rich soil in woodlands and produces tall stems with clusters of cobalt blue flowers.  A rosette of large leaves forms colonies. In late spring it rises up and blooms. A great and showy pollinator perennial for part shade to high overhead shade. Easy to grow plant that loves rich soil with regular irrigation in summer. This verdant plant begins blooming in May and continues to July. It also makes a lovely long lasting cut flower. Disappears completely in winter- no presence. To 2′ tall in bloom and spreading to form multiple rosettes.Protect from deer. Mix with other part shade and rich soil loving perennials as Tricyrtis, Clinopodium, and Hosta. Visited by hummingbirds as well. Native to northern India and China. Nice perennial that is seldom seen.

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Elegant, sturdy mahonia that has wands of small red and yellow flowers in late summer. To 5′ tall give it full sun to part shade. Avoid the reflected heat of walls. The somewhat concave pinnate leaves are frosted on the underside with very light gray blue. The wind, however must really howl to reveal this secret. Stiff  and upright, it flails toward the sun in shade. It is at its best in very high overhead shade or morning sun with afternoon shade (an eastern aspect). Occasional deep soaks in summer ensures the display of fall flowers. The tiny flowers are replaced by oblong small fruits that begin pink and arrive at purple/black upon ripening. Most of these fruits will b consumed by birds. The subtle flowers are a beacon to both hummingbird and Bush tits. Good shrub where heavy snow/ice occur. Cold hardy to slightly below 0ºF. Grows fairly slowly. Mix in shrub borders or low water high shade. Pretty shrub native to China. Not bothered by deer or rabbits. Raised from seed. Limited quantities. Red flowered Mahonia.

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Nevin’s mahonia or barberry is a remarkably tough evergreen shrub for the roughest locations. A moderately fast growing evergreen with somewhat fiercely armed blue green leaves. New growth of divided leaves is conspicuously tinted red. In spring small yellow flowers appear and cover the whole shrub, by late summer these have morphed into translucent red berries relished by birds. Native to southern California and surprisingly cold tolerant – like zone 4b tolerant thats -25ºF. Its kind of funny that we didn’t go for this remarkable durable plant. a long time ago, instead we were saddled with the horror of English holly.  Once established it requires absolutely no further irrigation.  It’s perfectly adapted to our winter wet summer dry climate. Full sun is non-negotiable Excellent shrub for rural areas as it is incredibly resistant to deer and even rabbits, In time it becomes a dense rounded shrub- very handsome. Excellent shrub to deter unwanted folks or animals. I’ve often thought this would be an ideal rural hedge with little care beyond planting and watering to establish- then set it free. Virtually any well drained soil. Avoid standing water at any time of the year. Beautiful, tough west coast native shrub. 8′ by 6′ in 7 years.

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South African Honey Bush that we grow from seed. This bold sub-shrub/perennial entrances people with the large blue symmetrical, pinnate, serrated  leaves. Large plant to 6′ x 6′ in 5 years. Semi-evergreen it can freeze to the ground below about 20ºF and will vigorously regrow from the base in spring. Its important that Melianthus be very well established the first season going into its first winter. A large root mass ensures re-sprouting from the coldest winters. If the winter is mild 1′ tall inflorescences of black and red are odd, spectacular, and an ode to goth gardening in early summer. Rich soil that is never boggy in a warm, protected location with regular water to establish. Even if winter is only semi-cruel and the stems stand but with tattered leaves the whole plant can be cut to the ground AFTER ALL THREAT OF FROST HAS PASSED. Mulch for the first autumn w/ dry leaves and compost. Excellent at the base of a warm wall or a south facing aspect. Appreciates good care and water.. Mix with other large, bold perennials- Aralia californica (Elk clover) and Lobelia tupa (Devil’s tobacco) .  Very dramatic in containers.  Container grown plants should be protected from arctic cold (below 20ºF). The large leaves have the odor of peanut butter when disturbed/bruised. Its pungent and spot on. Not often bothered by deer. Might be somewhat rabbit resistant. Nice bold, tropical affect.We offer two other named cultivars, to be honest any one of these seedlings could be as good or exceed those cultivars.

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Harford’s onion grass isn’t really an onion, its a true grass and is widespread in Western Oregon.  A handsome blue green clumping  grass on average to 2′ tall- bigger in rich soil with irrigation. smaller in natural rainfall only plants. The blue green blades which are up to 4.5 mm wide arch on a vase shaped plant. In mid spring to early summer infloresences that soar up and out with  the stems lined in larger seeds.  Superfically, they resemble.rice plants thought this is a drylands grass. Wonderful meadow component. Summer drought adapted, competes well with foreign invaders as well. Currently its most stable populations occur on the upper dry banks of rivers. This native grass goes summer dormant with drought. Self sows, best in an environment where this is not a problem. Handsome, graceful, useful native grass.  Combine with Sidalcea virgata and  Iris tenax. Oregon native plant.

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A wonderful sister to our  variegated selection of Osmanthus armatus ‘Zipline’. This all gold form emerges tinted in red before the leaves turn to an illuminating lemon, lacquer yellow.  The symmetrically spined leaves add to the display. Full sun to part shade. Variegation is brightest in full sun. Moderately fast growing and glowing evergreen shrub for average to enriched soils. Ligjht consistent summer water to establish, then occaisionally depending on aridity. To 4′ x 4′ in 6 years and then progressive larger. Shares the same toughness as the species enduring temperatures slightly below 0ºF. Tiny white flowers are adorable in fall but add little. Not fragrant that I can detect, but the glory of this shrub is in how vivid the foliage shines. Not perfectly drought tolerant, check it before heat waves. Other than that its handsome year round and gets better with age. Tolerates some subfreezing wind. Not the first shrub/tree on a deers list but you never know. Mine is home to the deep blue flowered Clematis ‘Rhapsody’ for a brilliant contrast.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Broad leaved Penstemon is one of the few species that is actually native in the Portland city limits. In fact it can still be located in its pristine feral state on the  bluff very near the University of Portland.  Its a steep slope on clay and loam with lots of rocks. The patches of this semi-evergreen perennial  are nestled underneath native Ponderosa and Madrone- don’t even try to go down there as the understory is pure poison oak. The broad rosettes produce tall flower trusses that are arranged in whorls on a 30″ stem.  Beautiful luminous blue with lavender mother of pearl tints. Full sun to high overhead shade in average to slightly amended soil. Water  for the first summer to establish , let the soil dry between irrigation.  Soil should never be soggy. Not really that difficult.  Its literally from here so if I ever fail with this perennial god help me. LOVED by all flying things  and an excellent back of the border plant for native beds. Combine with Adelinia , Pectinatia,  Iris tenax for a similar biome and culture. To 30″ tall in bloom the rosettes of broad leaves  expand to several feet wide. Seed grown.  Oregon native plant.

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This seedling Mock Orange appeared in our nursery rooted right into our gravel substrate. It was either a seedling of a few Philadelphus from eastern Oregon that we raised  a several years ago or it is a seedling of a naturally occurring plant about 50 meters away on the forest margin of our wholesale nursery. Either way its an astonishing shrub in full bloom. Rather than small clusters of white flowers with a yellow center this shrub creates 6″ long stems with clusters of up to 10 on each. The effect is a billowing cloud of white flowers for many weeks in June to July. No other native Philadelphus we have seen compares in number of flowers. The foliage is literally obscured by the lightly orange blossom scented white flowers. Fast growing even in less than perfect conditions to 9′ tall by 4′ wide in 7 years. The parent plant gets no supplemental water whatsoever relying on only what falls from the sky. The handsome mid green leaves take on yellow tints in autumn but is not a show stopper. In bloom, however, it is. Loved by pollinators. Full sun to very light shade in average to enriched soil. Water consistently for the first season to establish then none in subsequent years. Wonderful specimen or hedgerow member . Extraordinary in full bloom. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed AFTER blooming . This form has a  nice sweet scent that becomes most apparent several years after being in the ground. Associated plants in the wild are Corylus cornuta californica and Oemleria cerasiformis in the Willamette Valley. Oregon native plant.

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Willow leaved Podocarpus is a large tree native to Chile. Its defined by thin willowy deep green foliage that is dense and somewhat pendulous and reddish shredding bark. In our climate it mostly takes the form of a large shrub. Its ultimate height of 66′, will take decades and decades in our climate and this dense evergreen takes very well to pruning. The somewhat waxy foliage is pretty and verdant year round. To 15′ all in 10 year in Portland. Excellent trimmed hedge or specimen. Prune directly before new growth begins in Spring.  Small olive green pillar shaped flower morph into small blue fruits. Native between 36º south and 43º south this forest tree in areas of high precipitation has become very endangered in the wild.  Excellent shrub/tree for large container. Rich to average soil that drains with regular water during the summer. In time it gains drought tolerance. Very good year round appearance Very dense and useful as a large screen or hedge. Gains cold hardiness with establishment and we’ve seen no issues down to 5ºF. F. Full sun to very light shade.  Lightly deer resistant.

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Birds foot buttercup is one of the more common varieties in  Oregon. Larger (taller) than Ranunculus occidentalis it also has a darker almost maroon gray coloring on the back of each petal. Birds foot buttercup thrives in areas that are often submerged in winter Though it favors wet sites in will easily accommodate dry conditions as well and is happy in upland situations.  Short lived perennial (3-5 years). Blooms about three weeks after western buttercup.  in April to June. The whole plant goes quickly summer dormant after setting seed in conspicuous spiked capsules. Easy to grow in gardens as this species is used to regular moist soil. To 14″ x 18″wide. Very forgiving native that will happily reseed if given room. Excellent applications in a rain garden.   It makes a pleasant cut flower too with the same reflective inner petals. Not bothered by deer or rabbits. Rich to average soils and especially heavy clay soils. Good native pollinator plant.  Oregon native plant.

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Restios are ancient plants native to South Africa their closest relative is conifers but they look like grass/reeds. None is perfectly hardy in our climate and you should only plant this spectacular evergreen perennial in a protected location. The 9′ stems are clad in curtains of soft fine leaves that hang down. The affect is brilliant. Green/ochre foliage looks good year round or until we drop to 16ºF which is fatal. That being said this spectacular plant can live in gardens for 10 years or more. Its fantastic at the milder Oregon coast. This clumping perennial gains width and height with every year. It prefers average to slightly enriched soil and mulch is beneficial- especially in autumn. Let the plant dry between watering. This bold plant also makes an exemplary container plant.  Definitely plan for it to double in size in a year. Not bothered by deer. Wonderful with other perennials or shrubs that are drought adapted. Inland locate this plant in the most protected spot in your garden preferably against a south or west facing wall. Not permanent but worth it as a risk. Able to freeze to the ground and return.

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Catalina perfume is the common name for this lovely, tough evergreen currant from Southern California. The round evergreen leaves which do remind one of a Viburnum are resinous and spicily fragrant, especially on warm days. To 3′ tall and spreading about 6′ -this low shrub is best adapted to part shade and little to no summer water. It is incredibly drought adapted. In late winter to mid spring panicle of rose red flowers are light and airy- followed by green fruit. This is an ideal groundcover shrub under native Oaks.  It also makes an almost formal ground cover in landscapes . Found specifically on Santa Catalina in the Channel Islands off of southern CA. There it grows with other Channel island endemics. Tolerates full sun in our climate but its home is beneath the canopy. Water for the first year to establish then none in subsequent years. Not bothered by deer- unsure of rabbits. Prune it if needed after blooming. Blooms on wood from the previous year.  Excellent combined with Vancouveria chrysantha and Camas liechtlinii. for a culture and climate adapted grouping.  Grows very fast when happy.

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This has become a famous  favorite floribunda rose of gardeners all over. It does especially well in our climate and even endures and blooms in considerable shade. The very full  double flowers are 4.5″ across. They begin as buds that are colored distinctly brown, as the flower unfurls it changes to more of a parchment color then to lavender and finally silver white. It has a  moderate sweet fragrance and it re-blooms continuously and heavily until frost. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Disease resistant foliage on an upright vase shaped shrub to  3” x 3′ wide. Rapid and heavy re-bloom provides cut material all summer into autumn. This old fashioned faded flower color is brilliant with other more solidly colored double roses of pink or orange. The pointed buds are formed on long stems. Rich soil with regular summer water for the fastest re-bloom.  Prune hard AFTER PRESIDENTS DAY ( about FEB 20th). Prune off  everything with a diameter smaller than a pencil. Very easy forgiving rose that makes all others look fantastic. I would never be with out this charming, bloomy excellent rose. A floribunda rose that is prolific but whose flowers are much more like a  hybrid tea. Appreciates three applications of a handful of organic rose food + a handful of Alfalfa meal around the base per season. On its own roots. Wonderful multicolor morphing magic rose.

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Bald hip rose or woodland rose or miniature rose- three names that describe this dainty inhabitant of woods.  A light textured small shrub to 2′-4′ depending on the fertility the soil. Spreads laterally by stolons and it can occupy a large area. Charming nickel sized flowers are pink and lightly fragrant when they appear from April to June. The hips that follow are diminutive and slick without prickles (bald). Slow growing plant that is ideal in shade to dense shade. One of the best native shrubs for shady locations. It will also tolerate full sun but it doesn’t look as happy. A big hit with pollinator and birds who distribute this little roses seeds all throughout western Oregon. Thorns are small and do not hurt. Associated plants in the wild are Polystichum minutum (western sword fern), Osmoronia cerasiformis (Oso plum) and Clinopodium douglasii (Satureja). Woodrose grew on our property near Eugene. It formed the understory layer beneath firs and oaks with Symphoricarpos alba (Snowberry) Not deer resistant but its not first on their list. Light orange fall color. Oregon native plant.

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A great perennial all around, with handsome pinnate foliage and 30″ spikes that hold furry upright magenta catkin-like flowers. Beautiful. Blooms June-August in rich soil with regular irrigation. Not a fussy perennial by any means but it hails from Japan a summer rainfall climate and if you mimic that watering regime in your garden its simple. Completely herbaceous (deciduous). Seems to respond to rich conditions very well. Match with other perennials of similar culture such as Echinacea, Agastache, Erigeron. Forms tight but expanding clumps.  Wonderful  cut flower. Excellent pollinator perennial as well as visitations from Butterflies. Long lived perennial. Full sun to very light shade. If you remove spent flowers you may get a second round of flowers Tolerates heavy soil, with irrigation.

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Bluff  Checkermallow. One of the very rarest Checkermallows native to Oregon. This bright pink flowering perennial can be found along the northern Oregon coast and up the Columbia to near Portland. The lush, glossy maple shaped leaves surround a turret of bright, light pink flowers. Often seen on bluffs overlooking the ocean this is a perennial that excels on slopes and in clay soils. Easy to grow checker mallow that can be watered to establish then set it free. To 2′ x 3′ forming large patches. The blunt spires of flowers appear anytime from May to October, with the largest show in early summer. Loved by pollinators as well as hummingbirds. Lovely mid border plant, though it does seek slightly drier conditions in late summer. Full sun to very light shade. Amend the soil with a little bit of compost and that is all. Nice cut flower. Occurs natively with Rubus ursinus, Ranunculus occidentalis, Polystichum minutum. Long lived.  Oregon native plant.

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This is a wonderful compact and shorter growing golden rod that we found from seed. To just 1′ tall  and spreading to form a colony this smaller version fits in tighter places. The large conical flowers are erect at the top of the plant. An excellent version of one of the best pollinator perennials for late summer and early autumn. Average soil with light water to establish. Occasional water after that speeds growth. Mix with other late season native perennials such as Douglas and Halls aster. Winter deciduous and the stems become semi woody and can be left to supply seeds for birds throughout winter. The woody stems can be removed in early spring. This well sized and showy perennial is not only climate adapted its a very long lived perennial. Adaptable to heavy clay soils and drought. Adorable native perennial. To 3′ wide in time. Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants introduction

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Big in every way this Golden Rod of the west rises on sturdy semi-woody stems to display a chalice of fragrant gold flowers. Better put in latin the broad flowers are pyramidal paniculiform arrays, That about says it. Large growing perennial that is found in specific wetland sites around the state (and the west). It spreads laterally by strong rhizomes with stems that rise to 4′ tall. The PYRAMIDAL PANICULIFORM gold flowers emit a sweet pollen fragrance. This and the fact that it is in the daisy family draws a broad amount of pollinators  from far and wide. It dies down in winter and the previous years stems can be taken away then. Give it at least 5′ x 5′ to roam. Water to establish then a light consistent water in summer for best flowering. Full hot sun not tolerant of shade at all. A large, regal cut flowers for big displays July-September. This form was found in the Columbia River Gorge near the river. It can also be found around wetlands in arid parts of the state as well as river courses along the west side. The underside of the stems flashes silver with green on top. These incredibly sturdy vertical stems will never topple. Mix with Hall and Douglas Asters for similar space, bloom time and vigor and you’ll quadruple your pollinators.   Oregon native plant.

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This is the true Varnished leaf Spiraea that is  native in the Portland area. The large fluffy inflorescences – almost furry and true  tiny petals.   This too is a wonderful shrub that is tolerant of a host of situations. It is native in the Portland, city limits and knowing where it grows will lead to success with this easy going native. To about 3′ x 3′ and increasing laterally by stolons. This low deciduous shrub is primarily  a resident of high douglas fir overstory, but it can alsmost make appearance at the wetter end of oak savanna. The flowers appear from late spring to early summer. They are natural landing pads for butterflies even hummingbirds appear.  Best in an open north exposure with regular H20 then the following year less to none. Its naturally one of the most drought adapted of this genus. Give this plant room to spread, interweave its way around Holodiscus and Symphoricarpos, Gaulthria shallon. in rich soil ( to begin its life and establish)  Fall color can be yellow to peach and can also not really happen. Wonderful plant. Oregon native plant.

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We have been so impressed with the performance of this small evergreen tree species that when we saw this charming narrow leaved form we snagged it. An upright growing but not wide tree to 18′ tall. The thin leaves are 4mm wide but up to 6cm long and are thinly produced so that the tree has a fine texture and is even better to view the late winter and early spring red brushy, flowers. Moderately fast growing it is also very drought tolerant. Water to establish and in summer  or to speed growth otherwise it can get by on natural rainfall. Very neat and tidy and cold hardy to -5ºF.  This tree is a good candidate for areas affected by subfreezing east wind- its exceptionally tolerant of that for a broad leaved evergreen. Full sun to high overhead shade ( with less of the red flowers). In time the cut branches can be brought inside and forced into bloom for arrangements. Not deer food, but i’m not as familiar with this form. Unusual, tough and beautiful. Narrow leaved Sycopsis.  Tolerates many soil types including heavy soils in upland situations. SW China

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Tall Thalictrum or Many fruited Rue. A wonderful native perennial that will win you over with its great grace and tenacity. Many divided blue green leaves are composed like shelves along a tall blooming stem. The effect is that of a pastry tray with multiple levels. In early spring a group of these pretty and delicate looking leaves are arranged in a circle. As the spring advances so does the bloom stalk up to 4′ tall in rich soil with regular water. Best with an occasional deep soak in summer, native primarily to wet  areas. Its very common companion is Giant Larkspur Delphinium trolliifolium and both species of Camas. The flower that erupts from a  many branched scape holds mostly downward pointing stamens with very small modest petals. It perches on the end of the stem like a small chandelier. Winter deciduous. Found primarily in the moist areas west of the Cascades in the inland valleys. Very easy to grow native perennial that improves under cultivation but retains its feral tough habit. Long lived perennial for part shade to high over head shade. Not bothered by deer. Oregon native plant.

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Elk Horn Cedar is originally from Japan but is grown around the globe This layered and refreshing glossy green conifer grows very slowly and looks fantastic year round. Slow growing to 3′ x 3′ in 10 years. Excellent in mixed borders or shrub borders. Water well to establish the first summer then occasional deep soaks in summer. Unlike any other comfier the name elk horn refers to the flat leaflets that look to me like a form of giant moss. Works well in winter containers. The flattened scales are glossy on the surface and dull beneath. This is the darker green of two varieties in the nursery trade. It would make a challenging bonsai. Full sun to light shade in rich to average soil .  Not often deer food, very worth trying. Cold hardy below 0ºF for short periods. Excellent performance in the Columbia Gorge.

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This wonderful grape vine was originally found along the Russian River by Roger Raiche and is absolutely stunning in autumn. This very large growing deciduous grape will eventually grow to 20′ and develop a sturdy, gnarled trunk. Grows about 3′-6′ per year. This is a wild hybrid between the European Wine grape and our native  vitis californica. What that yields is one tough plant that handles our climate like a champion. Best used in wild areas and if you are going to plant it to grow up a tree make sure the vine you start with is small and the tree you put it in is big. In September-November a long display of brilliant claret red foliage- the individual leaves can be 10″ across. Simultaneously it will sport dark purple edible fruit in large clumps. The medium green foliage is leathery and is best in part shade to full sun. Especially brilliant draping evergreen oaks as it was found in the wild. Climbs by tendrils but provide very strong support at least #4 copper wire.  Leaves arrive in mid spring. Very drought adapted when established. Water for the first season to establish then set it free. Vitis californica can be found in bot the Rogue and Umpqua river basins in Oregon.

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