NEW! In 2022

An exciting shrub/small tree with paddle shaped blue evergreen phyllodes for foliage and in late winter to early spring a massive display of luminous yellow flowers. I’ve always loved Australian wattles so it was with great excitement that we decided to grow this striking plant. Moderately fast growing to 16′ tall and 8′ wide forming either multiple or a single trunk. The bark is chocolate brown and smooth. Very few Australian Acacias will thrive in Portland,  its just about 5 degrees too  cold in our coldest years. This one is different, (a few species will live for 4-6 years before they finally succumb to Jack Frost. Acacia pravissima etc.) This, however, is the cold hardiest  that we have grown. It is hardy to just below 10ºF for brief stints- good enough for long term survival. This is a rare limited endemic to the high mountains of New South Wales but is popular as a garden subject the world over.  The small, fluffy,  balls of electric yellow flowers foam among the blue leaves – incredibly pretty. Full sun and a protected location – against a south facing wall is ideal for a very pretty fun to grow tree. Once fully open the flowering stems may be cut for long lasting bouquets. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed after flowering has ended. Light consistent water to establish . Not fussy about soils and happiest in full, all day sun. Protect from subfreezing east wind. Bloom time is concurrent with several earlier Ceanothus  (‘Blue Jeans’, ‘Dark Star’, ‘Concha’) and creates a vivid early spring  yellow and blue display not soon to be forgotten. Drought adapted when established. Not bothered by deer/elk- not entirely sure about rabbits- if they are profuse in your neighborhood it wouldn’t hurt to protect the plant with chicken wire when young. Beautiful year round and spectacular in bloom. AKA Blue Bush.

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Spreading Dogbane is a pretty semi-shrubby native perennial that is found in every biome in our area. David Douglas mentioned this billowing perennial with clouds of light pink/white bells. Mostly he hated tripping over it in the Willamette Valley. This very permanent plant spreads to form big drifts in the wild. Streambanks, prairies, alpine meadows it can appear. The rounded downward pointing leaves emerge on semi-woody stems. In June-August clouds of flowers appear for weeks. Loved by pollinators and birds specifically attractive to native hummingbirds and butterflies. To 2′ tall and spreading by stolons to a wide area. Water to establish then none in subsequent years. Mulch after planting. Virtually any somewhat rich soil type including amended sand. Full sun to part shade. Wonderful plant and floral texture for meadows. I have great childhood memories of this plant in July in full bloom perched with our huge native black bumble bees. Very convenient bloom time- it begins to bloom just as most other natives are finished.  Dogbane is toxic when consumed by humans or animals- hence the common name. When stems are broken a milky sap is exuded. Moderate deer resistance.  Distantly related to milkweed. Once very common in the Willamette Valley its territory has shrunk. Great performance in hellstrips and verges that are lightly or completely non-irrigated. Give this plant room to spread and plan ahead. Limited availability. Oregon native plant

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Wonderful smaller Manzanita with clusters of vivid pink flowers, grass green foliage, and deep red/mahogany stems and bark. To 5′ x 5′ in several years. In time it makes a mounding form. The large clusters of pink flowers in February and March hang gracefully like clumps of grapes. Easy to grow for a low hedge or focal point. This is a great shrub to begin spring. Full sun and average, un – amended soil with water to establish then absolutely none after that. Great shrub for baking hot locations and even compacted soil. Both the size of the leaves and flowers which are large makes one think that this would be a very large almost arboreal cultivar- but no. Moderately slow growing. Loved by hummingbirds and native bees to which this is a very important plant. The flowers are slightly less hot pink than A. b ‘Louis Edmonds’. A very very pretty shrub. Extraordinarily drought adapted. No summer water.

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This is the Willamette Valley form of coyote brush (bush)- also known as chaparral broom. A relatively short lived evergreen shrub in the aster family. Indeed this form blooms in autumn through winter with small brushes of white plumed flowers on female plants. Smaller yellow flowers on males. Typical of the steepest cliffs abutting the ocean and in the Willamette Valley it populates recent road cuts and fire zones. Often it will be seen all alone in the center of a Willamette Valley field. Native inland from northern Marion country to Douglas county. Very fast growing and drought adapted daisy bush for rough sites and poor soil. Improved soil will yield an enormous shrub so its difficult to pin point an exact size but everything from 4′ tall in poor soil with no summer water to 12′ x 12′ in rich soil with irrigation. I suggest no irrigation after planting. Excellent fodder for insects and birds. It may be pruned heavily in spring and will quickly regenerate. Foliage is deep glossy green but fine textured. Not bothered by deer. Excellent native companion for Manzanita, Grevilleas. VERY EASY to grow. average life span 10 years. Good instant plant for a native garden, but not long term. Native from N. Oregon coast south to Baja California. A prominent component of the California beach chaparral and on the Oregon coast as well. Common associated plants on the coast are Salal (Gaultheria shallon) and Mahonia nervosa. In the Willamette Valley its primary role has been ursurped by Scot’s Broom. Too bad.  Oregon native plant.

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This is a relatively cold hardy and spectacular bottlebrush. Very upright growth on a vertical growing plant with distinctly blue leaves. In late spring soft yellow thick bottle brush flowers appear in a massive display. Hummingbirds and people come running. The glowing flower color set against a blue backdrop is sublime. Full sun (no shade, don’t even try) in a warm, protected location such as a south facing wall or fence. Moderately fast growing in the ground to 12′ tall and 4′ wide in 7 years. It can suffer considerable damage in our coldest winters, but established plants have recovered from temperatures below 10ºF. Blooms on wood from the previous year. Prune if needed after blooming has ended. Rows of button shaped woody seed capsule follow and persist for several years. Spectacular and easy at the coast. Aromatic foliage has some deer resistance. Protect containerized plants from temperatures below 20ºF. Blooms well in a container. Tasmania. Water to establish then occasionally in summer. Avoid strong subfreezing wind.

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Wonderful new Dianthus that enchants us with large single flowers of intricate coloring. One inch wide flowers have a pinked edge and the interior of the fragrant flower is a ring of darker pink. On either side of the ring a zone of coral on the center with a ring of very light pink on the exterior- see complex. The clove scented flowers appear from April-July and are showy for weeks. Excellent cut flower that produces long stems and is ideal for bouquets. To 1′ x 1′ forming a slowly spreading evergreen clump. Not bothered by pests or disease. If Dianthus are shy to bloom in our climate a handful of lime in winter is all thats needed. Regular water though bloom time then less required. Excellent combined with other smaller perennials. Enchanting with the chalk pink simultaneous flowers of Aethionema Shrubby rock cress. Evergreen. Flowers are edible and are sweet with a hint of the fragrance. Beautiful Dianthus. Long lived perennial.

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Oregon bleeding heart is a widespread lush, long blooming perennial wildflower for moist conditions in shade to full sun. A somewhat rambunctious plant that spreads quickly by stolons. Do not plant it near shy or small plants that can become swamped. It tolerates quite a bit of shade and if in full sun it thrives with supplemental water and a massive flower display. Divided soft green foliage is very good looking, in April-July a continuous supply of rose colored downward pointing clumps of flowers on an 18″ spike. The foliage rises on average to half that height. Responds vigorously to amended soils and regular irrigation. In hot dry situations it will go quickly summer dormant. In the shade with water leaves persist to autumn and re-bloom  occurs. Not bothered by pests, including deer and snails and slugs. Frequently found in shady ditches in the Willamette Valley. Winter deciduous, if not already summer drought deciduous. An easy to grow, self sufficient perennial for wild areas. Mix with other vigorous and scaled plants. Very easy to grow.  Oregon native plant

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Echinaceas have been bred, crossed and pretty much turned into mums. There is no doubt that the straight species and those closest to  it are the easiest and longest lived plants. This seed strain of Echinacea purpurea displays all the best traits of the species, Large deep rose reflexed petals around an orange/brown fragrant cone. Echinacea in our climate requires regular irrigation for the first two years to establish. Its critically important in the first year. Full sun and rich soil that drains with regular irrigation. Wonderful border perennial and even cut flower. Blooms late June to late August The spent flowers may be left to feed overwintering birds, the stems turn deep black and are  handsome as well. I’ve had excellent luck adding a handful of all organic fertilizer (dry) to the hole before planting. This helps the plant establish faster and in time it will require much less water. To 3′ tall and forming an enlarging clump. Moderate deer resistance. Native to the plains/midwest US. Fragrant. ( We don’t grow any double Echinacea because they are worthless to pollinators.)

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Beach fleabane or beach daisy normally runs in a mauve, to periwinkle vein. This lovely selection turns it up with crystal white daisies and a bold yellow center.  Long lived perennial that is very adaptable. To 6″ tall a happy clump will spread to 2′ wide or more. Low and spreading it displays the flowers upright in a mass. This beckons pollinates and they always find this easy going daisy. Full sun, rich to average soil with regular irrigation through the bloom period. This not only keeps the plant verdant it encourage re-bloom which can occur until September. The initial huge show of flowers begins in late May into July. Excellent perennial for the top of a wall where it will happily creep over the edge and follow the contours on the way down. It may be cut back hard after the initial large flush of flowers, this tidies the plant and sets the stage for another big show. Not bothered by deer and often left alone by rabbits. This daisy is most conspicuous in habitat on the cliffs adjacent to the beach. It also perches on sea stacks. Beach fleabane ranges from the Northern Oregon coast south all along the California coast. Mix with other Erigeron glaucus cultivars for depth of contrast- this is when all the flower colors look the most distinct. Very easy to grow and it also absorbs the heat of parking strips with no issues. Cold hardy. Oregon native plant

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This is an exciting new form of the butterfly glad, which we lovingly refer to as Gladzilla. So far, this cultivar is not nearly as rambunctious but is vigorous. Forming large colonies by bulb offsets as well as seed. Gray/green foliage rises to 16″ in clumps. In  mid summer a large display of Ruby pink flowers appear in staggered stems up to 24″. If left to its on devices and just watered a good clump can yield more than a dozen stems. It makes a fantastic cut flower and unopened buds will be forced open in the vase. Full sun and AVERAGE soil with REGULAR water for the first season then light irrigation in subsequent years.It is vigorous enough that you can rely on water alone to check its growth. Very easy to grow cold hardy perennial Gladiolus. Very long lived. Mixes well with other vigorous perennials for full sun and regular water. Not bothered by deer or pests. To 2′ wide as a clump. Winter deciduous. South Africa.

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We’ve been attempting to hybridize Grevilleas specifically, and that has proven to be difficult. What I rely on then are open pollinated hybrids – all Grevillea species can cross, pollinated by European honeybees in my garden they almost all set seed.  This is seed from a hybrid between Grevillea victorae x  Grevillea juniperina ‘Gold’. I sowed a bunch of seed and this seedling stands out as superior to the other seedlings and to many other Grevilleas that we grow. This is an upright growing and then spending evergreen shrub with distinctive small grass green wedge shaped leaves. The flowers are very large for a hybrid and the perianth is a soft citrus pastel orange. The style or pollen presenter begins life after opening with a red/melon color as it ages the style changes to light yellow from the tip down. The base of the style nearest the perianth remains dark melon red. Very heavy blooming selection. Flowers appear January-July and on older plants year round. The large clusters of un opened buds are shaded light pink before maturing.  Upright growing then spreading laterally with age. To 4′ tall and 6′ wide. All Grevilleas are a beacon to Hummingbirds and all birds as is this cultivar.  Full sun in average, un-amended soil. Dig a very large hole and water weekly until you see good new growth then taper to once a month. I’m very proud to offer this seedling, it is a vast improvement on other Grevilleas with similar size flowers- this one beats them all. Best in a warm, protected location.

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Cold hardy and very showy  Hebe that is an excellent small scale ground cover. To just inches high it expands over time to up to 4′ wide. The gray evergreen foliage is handsome year round. In early summer the tips of the plant are ensconced in violet- blue colored flowers. This showy display draws pollinators and butterflies. One of the showiest of the very cold hardy varieties. Takes temperatures below 10ºF with no damage. Excellent on slopes. Expanding branches can root where they touch the ground, making this spreader excellent for erosion control. It also grows with such density to block weeds. Very easy to grow. Mix with perennials and in-between shrubs in full sun to very light shade. Light CONSISTENT summer irrigation. The small gray leaves line the black stems for more exquisite detail. Excellent at the top of a wall where it will trail and follow the contours exactly. Moderate deer resistance.

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Excellent symmetrical evergreen foliage on a dense dome shaped shrub. The sea green/blue cupped foliage surrounds deep mahogany stems. To 2′ tall by 3′ wide forming a moderately fast spreading plant. In spring and often again in late summer a parade of sparkling pink flowers. They look wonderful agains the foliage. Easy to grow lovely shrub with a year round handsome interest. Excellent performance at the Oregon coast.  Good cold hardiness into the lower teens or lower for brief periods. Light consistent summer water in full sun to very light shade. Protect from subfreezing wind which won’t kill it but can make this Hebe unhappy. Good long term performance in gardens and a welcome flower color in a genus replete with purple, blue, and white. Nice looking shrub at all times. Best in enriched soil. Remove the first round of flowers to better view the second late summer display.

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The O’Byrnes gave us this strain of the variegated form of Helleborus x sternii. Inheriting cold tolerance from H. corsica and nifty, thick palmate leaves from the more tender H. lividus .The result is a tough plant with green cupped flowers stained rose on the outside of the bell. The flowers remain effective for several months. Not quite as long as the straight H. x sternii, but a relatively long time. A shrubby species with large evergreen leaves. They are heavily speckled with cream dots with an underside to the leaves and the stems tinted pink. The palmate leaves become large and arching. Full sun with more frequent irrigation to full  shade with less. To 2′ x 2′. Deer and possibly rabbit resistant. The rough leaves resist weather. Site as you would for a small shrub. It is elegant with other woodlanders or can be grown with drought tolerant to low water plants even in full sun. Flower bend over enshrouded in a cup shape that protects the pollen from rain and the vagaries of winter weather.  Blooms January with flowers effective for three months. Great, sophisticated but tough plant for rural areas. May be afflicted with aphids in late spring. Hose those off or do not look closely.

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Pale green leaves are striking and fade to cream, the transition  appears  differently on each leaf and  the gradation of colors give you a cool affect. Pair that- pale leaves with the darkest red flowers we have yet to see on this species and you get a phenomenal plant. Adapted to part shade to full sun – and it doesn’t burn or bleach in sun. A long lived perennial with blood red flowers and foliage the color of Draculas skin that spreads to form colonies 1′ x 2 wide. In bloom the straight dark stems rise to 18″ tall. The deep red but small flowers are full of nectar and call hummingbirds, butterflies and a host of other small pollinators. Blooms for an extended period from late April to early July. Rich soil with regular irrigation to establish for the first season then just light summer irrigation. Long lived pest free perennial. We adore it in light shade paired with Hosta ‘Blue Mouse Ears’ for a soothing gray blue back drop. A selection from this native of the south western U.S. into Mexico. Semi-deciduous in winter. Leaves shrink but there is a presence. Very showy in bloom. Avoid crowding by other plants.

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Clackamas Iris is a rare endemic to only three counties in northern Oregon. Though it appears in scale with Pacific Coast Iris, it is not related and is more closely aligned with bearded Iris. Pale green 15mm wide leaves first emerge vertically before settling to a more horizontal position. Light lavender buds unfurl to white with yellow on the falls in May-July. In its native range this smaller iris is everywhere which  begs the question; Why isn’t its natural range larger? Not bothered by deer or pests this is a supremely climate adapted perennial. To 12″ tall in bloom the arching leaves equal that and spreads out. Light consistent summer water to establish, then only what falls from the sky. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. In habitat it is an understory component with Sword Ferns and shrubs such as Hazel, Oso Berry, and Viburnum. Provide deep rich soil and room to spread. This Iris makes very large colonies quickly- to 3′ wide.  The broad leaves are winter deciduous. Wonderful Iris for gardens and wild areas.  Oregon native plant.

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A really wonderful dwarf Lily that doesn’t have you pulling down pollen covered flowers to get a smell. This lily tops out at about 14″ tall so, you’ll be bending down or even better, in a container where you can observe the intricate coloration and sweet perfume. Very thin leaves are like strings and give the small trunk a fine texture. In June/July relatively huge maroon buds open to reveal an extremely fragrant flower with an ivory interior- each individual blossom is 4″ long- very large for the overall size of the plant. Blooms continuously for 3-4 weeks. Full sun and regular water. Not bothered by lily diseases and very easy to grow. This hardy perennial increases by multiplying bulbs as well as bulbils and seed. The fragrance is not closely like most oriental lilies. Instead its a mild perfume that lingers. Plant with other smaller scale perennials. Diascia ‘Blue Bonnet’, Dianthus ‘Dainty Dame’. In time a clump will sport 3-5 flower spikes.

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One of the boldest species of lily turf that is as tough and adaptable as the rest of the genus. Wide leaves (for this genus) measure about 1″ wide and form rosettes that are staunchly evergreen. The initial rosette measures about 1′ across, in time it increases by stolons as well as enlarging clumps. This species is native to SW Asia and is surprisingly cold hardy.  Great year round appearance of foliage. In late summer 2′  thin spikes  rise above the leaves and displays soft mauve flowers for several weeks. An added vertical element that is subtle but very pretty. Part shade to shade, avoid hot dry sites. Rich soil and regular irrigation speeds growth and establishment. Adaptable to dry shade when established. Great in year round containers- I have yet to see it blemished by winter weather. Easy to grow, long lived perennial that is pretty and useful. Not bothered by deer- unsure about rabbits but I suspect they would love it. This Liriope has the widest leaves. Clumping. Consistent summer irrigation for the best appearance. Pronounced Leer-EYE- oh-pee.

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Incredibly long blooming native sub-shrub with clouds of fragrant purple flowers for all of summer into autumn. To 2′ x 2′ forming a semi-woody base. The aromatic round leaves cup the flower buds as the stems elongate. Loved by all native pollinators. A wonderful plant in the mint family that is very easy to grow and long lived for this genus. This selection sports slightly darker purple and longer blooming flowers. Found from Douglas County, Oregon south throughout California.  Freezes back in very cold winters but sprouts quickly with warm weather in spring and commences bloom quickly. Great as a mass planting and ideal in a meadow. Also, adaptable to rock gardens and indeed thats where you find it in the wild- among gravel, rocks, and boulders. Mix with other long blooming native perennials such as Erigeron glaucus (sp & cvs) and among California fescue (Festuca californica). A very climate adapted plant. Cut back spent flowers and more will follow.  Nice cut flower. Very long blooming. Light summer water to very little when established. Some deer resistance. AKA Showy coyote mint. Oregon native plant.

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Tan bark oak or Tan Oak is native to the SW corner of Oregon south into the mountains of southern Calfiornia. The large convex leaves emerge clad in gray fur as this wears off it reveals a mature deep green with an underside of silver. Moderately fast growing evergreen tree to 45′ tall x 25′ wide in 30  years. Grows on average 2′-4′ per year when young. This close relative of Oaks produces acorns that are light tan and born out of an indumentum covered prickly cup. In Oregon this tree mostly of mountains can be found most extensively from Douglas and Coos County south to the coastal border. It is found in the higher elevations of the mountains of northern California where quite a bit of heavy wet snow occurs. This tree will bend in snow and ice and it will not break. Conical and spreading crown. Tan Oak which was harvested in the 19th and early 20th century for the collection of commercial tannins. Full sun, it grows well but is slower and a bit spindly as an understory tree. The furrowed bark is dark brown to black. Its range is almost the same in Oregon as Canyon live oak (Quercus chrysolepis) and cold hardiness is equivalent too, hardy just below 0ºF. Wonderful, stately, native evergreen shade tree. Ours are raised from acorns collected at the northern extent of its range in Douglas County.  Oregon native plant.

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We’ve met a lot of good gardeners and I’m always most amazed at peoples attention to detail. Good gardeners love detail. Mary De Noyer is a favorite customer and well known for her fastidious and beautiful garden. Several years ago Mary brought this seedling Podophyllum to us and asked that we grow it. Her only stipulation was that we name it ‘Audrey’.  Done! This is a remarkable perennial that we are proud to finally have a salable population. The large convex star fish shaped leaves are a glowing amber to madder red. Following the unufurlment and maturation of the leaves pendant dark wine red flowers appear on the leaf petiole- in this case the trunk. To 2′ tall a mature leaf can be more than 1 foot across. This probable hybrid May Apple is a bold and beautiful perennial for part shade to high overhead shade in rich soil with consistent summer moisture. Add all purpose fertilizer around the base each spring. For the first several years the clump of bold leaves increases close to a clump. After permanent establishment and with a lot of moisture this perennial will run by stolons. It will run as far as rich, moisture retentive soil allows. Beautiful plant. Thank you Mary De Noyer.

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Sierra gooseberry or sticky gooseberry is a pretty if prickly native deciduous shrub for rough areas. Charming in bloom , the 1/2″ pendant flowers have sepals that are reflexed and red around a pendant white corolla. After opening they both change to light red and remain showy for several weeks. They line zig zagging stems with three thorns at each node. That means  you must site this 7′ tall by 4′ wide arching plant carefully. The flowers are pretty viewed up close and turn into prickly translucent green/red drupes. These are eaten by a huge variety of wildlife and especially smaller birds. Often the shrub will be completely stripped of berries by the time the soft orange fall color appears. Native from the Cascades of Marion county south throughout inland California down to San Diego county CA. Its most often found in dry gravelly areas on slopes in full sun to deep woods where its habit is more restrained and open. Blooms appear in mid spring. Water lightly to establish the first summer then only what falls from the sky in subsequent years. Adaptable to dry shade if it is not completely dark. Moderate deer resistance. Very similar to another native Gooseberry Ribes lobbii which is discrete in its dull non sticky leaves. Wonderful native shrub.Rarely seen in habitat below 1000′.  Oregon native plant

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This large hybrid shrub rose was a spontaneous volunteer at the Bellevue Botanical Garden in Washington. Big, soft green pinnate leaves are almost floppy. Beginning in May and repeatedly through summer 4″ wide rosy pink flowers with raspberry red stamens appear. They age slowly to light lavender in a few days. The huge single flowers are  often followed by large orange/then red hips. Each flower is so enormous that it bends the branches considerably when the flower is open. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Wonderful, informal, and showy shrub to 6′ x 6′ in a season. Blooms on wood from the current season. Prune heavily in early spring. Not bothered by most diseases, locate with good air circulation to stymie powdery mildew which it can be afflicted in cool, wet springs. Cool, floppy, cut rose with a slight fragrance. Thorny but not deadly. Regular water in rich soil. Add at least one handful of all purpose organic fertilizer in spring and again in summer. This rose is propagated on its own roots. Give this large, spectacular rose room to spread out.

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The blue flowers of the common and loved herb rosemary rivals that of Ceanothus and Lithodora. That is on certain varieties. Bloom typically begins in December and peaks in early spring continuing until late spring on the best varieties. This is the best variety for blue flowers. The obvious Salvia flowers on ‘Mozart’ are thick on the stems and are entirely dark blue- no interior dots of white or white splotches. Full sun and water to establish in average soil. Extremely drought adapted when established. This strongly arching shrub goes up to about 30″ and spreads to 4′ wide. Hillsides, the top of rock walls, containers subjected to reflected heat. Pork roast. Very good culinary use/taste for this plant. Hardy to about 5ºF. Good drainage improves cold hardiness. Tolerates the hottest places with no stress. Aromatic waxy resin will attach to your fingers. Blooms on wood from the previous season. Prune or harvest when needed after blooming has ended. Some deer resistance. Extraordinarily drought adapted. Great performance at the Oregon coast.

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Western Thimble berry is a widespread relative of raspberries that grows in many biomes and is especially abundant west of the Cascades. The 5 petal pure white  flowers that arrive in spring are among the largest of any Rubus. Thimble berry also does not have thorns. YAY.  It forms imposing patches spreading by a creeping rhizome. The large maple shaped leaves can be up to 10 cm wide To 4′ tall and spreading – give it room and plan ahead. The sweet edible red berries appear in mid-late summer. They may be detached from a core on the end of the stem. It leaves a concave hollow berry- shaped like a thimble. Its fairly high in water content which means it does not ship well and its not big as a commercial crop. Nice looking large, opulent shrub for wild areas. Water to establish then none necessary in subsequent years. Thimble berry has a very long lifespan but it is also a seral species populating disturbed sites from fire, logging, roadsides. Full sun to quite a bit of shade with good air circulation- prone to powdery mildew in wet springs. It seldom causes permanent damage to the plant. Fall color is yellow to russet and lingers. Not bothered by deer  but birds will predate the fruit and then poop out a whole new colony. Wild areas, margins of forests.

Oregon native plant

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This short lived, very showy perennial is tough as nails. This strain enchants with huge flowers that are almost always single but come in tones from black to yellow, brown, orange, and red.. They immediately remind me of a blanket made by native Americans.  To 28″ tall ( compact ) with enormous flowers up to 5″ across. They come in a profusion from mid summer to early autumn. This strain has a natural life span of 3-5 years – but it does re-sow itself in open and opportune places. Open  soil that has been slightly enriched with compost / fertilizer. Full sun and regular water until fall rains take over. Mix with other sunset orange/ brown toned flowers. I pick the searing true red of Salvia ‘Royal Bumble’ as sell as the soft green spikes of Kniphofia pumila both will bloom simultaneously  with the Rudbeckia Excellent in summer containers and beloved for its long bloom time. Remove spent flowers for the first few rounds to encourage more bloom. leave the last round  to be pollinated and set seed. Excellent pollinator perennial. Regular water for the first season , less the following year. Some deer resistance.

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This Californian Sage is extraordinarily vigorous and spreads by underground runners to colonize large areas. That is if winter does not knock it back. Large quilted soft green arrow shaped leaves appear in early spring, by late spring 28″ tall chalice’s of rich red/pink (Raspberry) flowers erupt from dramatic and well spaced whorls. Rich to average soil that drains well. Water well in the first season to establish then very light to none in subsequent years. A Salvia of southern and central California  it has a distinctive aroma that is loved by some, despised by others. Mulch with dry leaves for the first winter or two. Doesn’t like wet plus subfreezing cold. Good, and restrained in a container. Protect containerized plants from extreme cold (below 20ºF). Nice and very dramatic cut flowers. Blooms March repeatedly until June. Great for hummingbirds, butterflies, and pollinators. Semi-deciduous in winter.

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Pacific Aster. Our selection of a widespread beach aster species that circles much of the temperate Pacific Rim. This form tops out at a compact 30″ on an upright plant that forms expanding clumps in rich to average soil ‘Short Sands’ is a purple form from seed of a very dark purple specimen that Greg found.  It is by far the darkest purple that we have encountered in this species. The majority are white to very light lavender. Most often its habitat is adjacent or very near the coastal strand. Its adapted to all kinds of soils from sand to clay and it appreciates deep infrequent water during the summer season. Blooms begin in August and open until mid November. This aster is often seen along the sides of HWY 101. In fleeting glimpse you can capture small periwinkle daisies late in the season. A pollinator master piece. All sorts of natives recognize this showy perennial. Full sun to light shade. It seems to be most vertical in full sun and average soil. Over amended soils, too much water, or too much shade will lead to a splaying flop. The flat upturned daisies come in rows of two for a fuller look and are a natural landing pad for butterflies.  Winter deciduous, very tolerant of dry conditions when established but does better with deep infrequent summer drinks. Cut back hard in spring- a new batch of leaves will just be arriving. This sophisticated  native is at home in pampered borders or wild areas. Associated plants in habitat are Mianthemum dilitatum, Calamagrostis nutkensis, and Vaccinium ovatum. Its habitat is dwindling as Everlasting Pea (Lathyrus latifolius) and Ox Eye Daisy (Dendranthema) have crowded this special plant out  Excellent garden plant.  Oregon native plant

Xera Plants Introduction

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Hall’s Aster might as well be known as Willamette Valley Aster as this charming smaller perennial is found primarily there. To 20″ tall and spreading to form a wider clump this native aster begins blooming in August and continues into Autumn. The small daisy flowers have rays that are primarily white, though light pink and lavender are also seen. The reverse of the petals is always a darker color- primarily very light lavender. Excellent native pollinator plant for late in the season. Full sun to very light shade in rich to average soil. Adaptable to xeric clay soils that dry in summer. In the garden deep infrequent soaks will yield the healthiest and most floriferous plants. Spreads moderately underground by stolons. Not bothered by deer. Nice little cut flower as filler for bolder arrangements. Climate adapted perennial that is a native for a Willamette Valley prairie. Not as vigorous and space consuming as Symphyotrichum subspicatum – Douglas aster. Hall’s aster fits in much smaller spaces. Easy to grow, winter deciduous. Associated plants in the wild are Sidalcea m. ‘Virgata’, Eriophyllum lanatum, Achillea millefolium.  Takes intense dry conditions with establishment. Oregon native plant.

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A widespread perennial in the Pacific Northwest. There are two subspecies and this larger leaf form is the more common of the two. A mounding deciduous perennial for moisture retentive soils in light shade to shade. This perennial is often seen along creek banks and seeps where access to water is not very far away. In May-July 18″ spikes of clear starry white flowers crowd a vertical stem. Very pretty and light. An excellent native perennial for woodlands, stream banks. riparian areas. Spreads in rich soil to form extensive colonies foliage tops out at 8″. Excellent combined with native and non-native ferns. Very dark green leaves are handsome throughout the season on a tough and easy to grow plant. Fall color is red and orange before leaves go away. AKA Trifoliate Foam Flower, Northwest Foam Flower. Not bothered by disease or pests that includes snails and slugs. YAY. Oregon native plant

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