NEW! In 2019

Probably one of our very favorite bulbs and a gift from a friend w/ VERY good taste and I’m happy to say we are going to have a steady supply in the future. For the moment quantities are limited. Why so special? This is the enormously huge version of that precious blue allium caeruleum. Flower size on the species which is very available are comparable to a nickel to a quarter size. This form cranks it up w/ flowerheads the size of golf balls and larger. Spectacular. This very rare form is so superior and still charming that I’ve put it all over my garden. It needs full sun and rich soil that drains. Not difficult by any stretch- though full sun is required. and I suspect more water than I give mine. I put one in then 3, then like 9 and I had to stop myself. Sky blue orbs. This plant needs to build up some bulk to bloom, which means you need a certain amount of leaves and bulb heft for them to bloom. I say this because its possible to sell them out of bloom because they are that freaking cool. <pant, pant> Semi evergreen leaves are low, thin and pungent. Possibly deer resistant- I don’t know yet. And bunnies. Well, Bunnies suck.

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A dazzling female selection of Japanese Aucuba with long, thin, tapered leaves of deep green randomly splashed with yellow spots. Dense and slow growing evergreen to 5′ x 5′ in 7 years. This selection will produce clusters of large red berries of a male is present. Very showy. Tiny brown/green flowers in spring are not conspicuous. Part shade to quite a bit of shade in average to enriched well drained soil. Established plants are incredibly drought tolerant and this striking shrub adds light and texture to dry shade areas. It will take full sun with regular irrigation and the leaves will be not as dark lustrous green. A very handsome shrub year round with great cold hardiness. Regular water through the first season to establish. Then light water. Long lived, easy to grow shrub whose dense habit does not require pruning.

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MINIMARGE! This is a dwarf form of Banksia marginata that has been cold hardy in the Portland area. The key to cold hardiness is to establish the plant well. Unlike other members of the Proteaceae this small shrub likes the soil a bit richer, but that drains well. You can even add a small amount of compost when planting but nothing other than that. Water it until you see good new growth then taper off to once every two weeks. Full sun, in a warm, protected location. A south facing slope w/ protection from East wind is ideal. To 3′ x 3′ in 7 years. On older wood 4″ tall yellow cones are produced as flowers from spring to autumn. Protect young plants from severe cold. Very good performance on the Oregon coast. In time it will form a small lignotuber. A swollen woody base with dormant buds. It may then be cut back fairly hard and re-growth will commence. Avoid crowding this plant with others. Open and happy is how it likes to be. Great plant for a large rock garden Hummingbirds adore the spectacular long lasting flowers. Foliage is deep green with an underside of silver and forms winding stems- never tidy. A plant for collectors primarily. This is not a plant for beginners. Heh. Avoid all fertilizers. Limited supply.

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We love this cold hardy species also known as mountain bottlebrush. This is our selection of a dwarf form and it achieves a very dense, compact habit at just 2′ tall by 3′ wide in 7 years. In May/June 1″ acid green bottlebrush flowers illuminate the tips of the branches. Pollinated by birds in nature it is a beacon to our local hummingbirds as well. Following the flowers rows of button shaped seed pods become woody and add to the shrubs interest. Full sun and rich to average soil with light consistent summer water for the first few years. It can tolerate regular irrigation but is summer drought tolerant when established. A great plant for foundations, rock gardens, hell strips. The pointed forest green foliage takes on maroon tints in the coldest weather. Cold hardy to 5ºF. Moderately deer resistant.

Xera Plants Introduction

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California meadow sedge is native to stream banks, and vernally wet places at the beach from British Columbia south in to Baja. A deep green winter growing sedge which each plant reaches about 18″ across and 10″ or so inches high. It flops over gracefully and has a very uniform appearance through the year with light irrigation. This is a winter growing plant that resumes growing and greens up with winter rains. In very cold weather (below 20ºF) it can take on russet tints. A FANTASTIC LAWN SUBSTITUTE where it has been used extensively for that application in California. We should use it here too. Plant on 1′ centers for a lawn (faux lawn) cover from one gallons and water regularly through the first season. No water plantings can go summer dormant but in wetter environs this can be avoided and it will remain green and verdant. Water once a week in summer to remain green.  Fantastic ground cover, slope cover as it will out compete weeds and form a uniform cover. Tolerates clay soils well, but some amending will reap rewards with a faster growing plant. Tolerates mowing very well. Oregon native plant. 

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This form of Blueblossom we found on the southern Oregon coast in the far northern part of Curry County. There seems to be two forms of Ceanothus thyrsiflorus in Oregon. The immediate coastal species up to Lane county has broader leaves. Inland you find a much taller form with smaller juvenile leaves. An example of this is our large selection ‘Oregon Mist’. This is the standard broad leaved form  you find adjacent to the beach. Glossy rounded leaves are lustrous and deep green year round. In late April to early June an extended period of profuse sky blue flowers. Adored by pollinators and rolling in grateful bees.  A large native shrub with a rounded outline. To 8′ tall and possibly a little wider in AVERAGE soil in 5 years. Amended soil leads to prodigious growth and lack of hardiness.  Fast growing low water shrub for full sun to very light shade. This plant that we collected in the wild is actually very similar to the cultivar ‘Victoria’- the primary difference is earlier bloom by several weeks. And a slightly lighter blue flower. This is a good standard form of the beach species as found in our state. Its been cold hardy to 5ºF with good pest free foliage. Ceanothus fix nitrogen with their roots and improve the soil. Also, years of detritus from the shrub collects to form wonderful enriched soil as well. Average life span increases the less this plant is watered once established but expect 9-15 years. Durable shrub for urban to rural places. Extraordinarily drought adapted as well as tolerant of dry clay. Pretty and utilitarian. Available, autumn 2020. Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction 

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Farewell to Spring is so called because it is one of the last conspicuous native wildflowers to bloom before the onset of summer drought. Often seen in mass populations waving above the already cere grass. Blooms May-July normally, but a little supplemental water and removing spent flowers will continue the show. Otherwise it will die upon setting seed. The 2′ tall stems support multiple pink cup shaped flowers. Most often with a darker pink/red blotch in the center of each petal. These assist in guiding pollinators and this plant is a prime source for all native bees and butterflies. Excellent cut flower that lasts for quite a while in a vase. This is the sources species of all the fancy cultivars that are raised in the cut flower trade. Reseeds happily in open disturbed sites. Locally native in the city of Portland. Excellent plant for wild areas and is often employed on road cuts and freeway embankments in deliberately sown wild flower mixtures. Oregon native plant.

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Mountain garland is a hardy annual native to the mountains of southern Oregon south into the Sierra Nevada in California. Sparkling white crape-like flowers line tall upright stems on this plant that can be small in poor soil and soar in rich conditions.  Size can be difficult to determine based on this…an average of 1′ tall is probably safe. Blooms continuously from May to as late as August if supplemental light water is supplied. Excellent among perennials such as Penstemons, Erodiums, Salvias, Cupheas. Sets copious seed for the following season and these will be white as well. Leave open disturbed sites in your garden to supply next years crop. Excellent cut flower as well and loved by Butterflies. Very easy to grow.

Oregon native plant 

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A wonderful garden perennial and by far our favorite mum for fall. Much more informal and relaxed in habit and flower form it puts on a stellar show for months in autumn. Soft, copper pink single flowers radiate from a soft yellow center. A bushy perennial to 28″ x 28″ in full sun to light shade. Best in enriched soil for a good start in life. Regular summer water propels growth and blooming which begins in September and stretches nearly to Thanksgiving. Cut back hard the previous years remnants in early spring – as per your tidying routine. Very pretty cut flower. Underplant with Ivy leaved hardy Cyclamen for a soft but showy display. Long lived perennial gaining scale each year. Moderate deer resistance. Aromatic curly foliage is classic Chrysanthemum.

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The bodaciously named Chilean Glory Vine is a great low weight, long and strong blooming perennial vine in our climate. Filligree intricately divided leaves and petioles wind this deciduous vine  up to 10′ in a season. Most years it returns to the ground and resprouts in spring and that isn’t a bad thing. It gives you the opportunity to clear away the previous seasons chaff. If we have a mild enough winter it will retain some green but you may still cut it back in early spring. Waves of long stemmed tubular flowers are soft pink with a recurved lip tipped in yellow. Its an exquisite show that goes unabated from late May to September. We’re very attracted to this orchid like coloration of this form and we find it accommodating for mixing colors. It also comes in red, orange, yellow, and cream- in time we will offer those. Hummingbirds LOVE this vine and will immediately show up when flowering commences. Much easier than cleaning and refilling a feeder. Remove spent flowers and that will encourage more flowers. Blooms on new growth. As it grows it blooms. Fantastic on the wall of a chicken coop providing ample shade. Rich soil that drains and regular summer water. Mulch the base- protect the crown in the first winter.

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True pink California poppy. Seed from this exceptional pink flowered selection comes true about 95% of the time. Deep rose pink semi-double flowers appear in late spring and continue sporadically until mid summer. A happy plant can become a short lived perennial but the majority will behave as bloomy annuals. Full sun and rich to average soil with good tilth (crumbly texture). It can even thrive in compacted soils. To 10″ x 10″ forming a compact plant with lacy blue foliage. The strident rose pink flowers are showy from a distance. Leave the last round of flowers to seed for the next several seasons. Excellent wildflower display in rough areas w/ low water. Water plants to establish then taper off. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Wonderful flower color. Mix with Eschscholzia c. ‘Alba’ the white form. Deer resistant and drought adapted native plant. Oregon native plant. 

Xera Plants Introduction

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We love ultra hardy Fuchsias, they are so carefree and they bloom and bloom. We found this Fuchsia in a garden near our shop. It was identified by our friend Annie Hayes at Annie’s annuals. Large growing subshrub to 5′ x 6′ in time. Red sepals surround a deep purple corolla with each petal marked with a strip of hot pink. Lovely. Flowers are large for a hardy Fuchsia and are profuse from June to frost. Fuchsia mite resistant. Very easy to grow in light shade to full sun. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water is ideal. Very established plants can make due with less. Freezes to the ground in the low 20’s- but not every year. Wait until new growth emerges then remove the frozen material. Loved by hummingbirds as well as gardeners. Lustrous  deep green foliage outlines the pendant flowers. You’ll never lose this long lived plant to winter. Good to try where rabbits are a problem.

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I selected this seedling because it is  smaller growing but with relatively large VIVID orange flowers. To 4′ x 4′ in 6 years. Wavy curved leaves are olive green with a white underside. Blooms nearly year round once established. This selection requires a protected location in inland western Oregon but it absolutely thrives and loves the Oregon coast. Full sun and well drained soil with good air circulation. Water to establish then none required, very, very drought tolerant. An absolute magnet for hummingbirds and over wintering Anna’s find it a special treat. Do not amend the soil, native unimproved soils are ideal. For heavier soils plant on a slope. Established plants may have 1/3 of their mass removed following a blooming session. This will not only make a denser plant, it will also spur it to bloom even more. Moderately deer resistant.  All hail DAVID BOWIE!

Xera Plants Introduction

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One of our very wonderful customers gave this plant to us. She’s been a loyal customer for years and in that time I’ve known her to be keen with observation and details. Which is why I immediately accepted this plant. It was seedling in her garden and it had thrived for many years with nary a scratch from cold or disease. The uniform deep green foliage has an underside of madder red and the stems share that hue as well. In August-November a prolonged show of scintillating purple flowers appear all along the tips. These cones of flowers are vibrant and are set perfectly against the deeply colored foliage. To 30″ x 30″ in 5 years. Full sun and soil that drains. Light consistent summer water ensures health. It has survived temperatures slightly below 10ºF so far with no incident. Handsome, showy Hebe for our gardens with a proven track record. Remarkable local Hebe selection.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Excellent selection of a long and fantastic summer blooming perennial. We’ve shied away from this genus because it does like regular water to look its best. That having been said, where you see our native Helenium bigelovii, it sits in riparian zones and along the edge of permanent and intermittent streams and in wet meadows. This selection is an exciting color break. Developed, chosen, and named at Rogerson Clematis Gardens here in Lake Oswego, OR. They obviously don’t just do Clematis- but if you have never been its one of the premier gardens in our area. Hardy perennial to 30″ tall from an expanding fairly dense clump.  In a season or two it reaches about 1′ across at the base. Wonderful flower color that is sumptuous and it blooms for many weeks. 4-6 weeks in late July, August, and early September. Excellent cut flower and it has a perfect scale for the middle of a well irrigated border, in full sun and rich soil. Loved by pollinators- and perfect for butterflies to land and feed. Long lived and winter deciduous.

Xera Plants Introduction (Via Rogerson’s Clematis Garden)

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A really cool form of Oak Leaf Hydrangea that I picked up in North Carolina. Full double thick, dense white flowers appear in place of the lacier form of the species. The dense cones of flowers appear on sturdy stems in late June and are effective until September. They are exceptionally showy as well as long lasting. Large, deciduous shrub for full sun to part shade in rich soil with consistent summer moisture. Very established plants can get by with less. Blooms on wood from the current season. If pruning is required do it in early spring. To 9′ x 9′ in 6 years. Fall color on the immense leaves is remarkable. For all the months of fall into mid-winter purple/red/orange tones wash over the whole plant. Leaves finally abandon the shrub in mid winter. Easy to grow wonderful multi-dimensional shrub that is cold hardy and durable. Give it room to spread, you won’t regret it. Yay ‘Turkey Heaven’. Limited supply. Native to the SE U.S.

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So many lavenders that we’ve decided to go with the very best. This hybrid is a cross between english lavender (L. angustifolia) and wooly lavender (L. lanata) and gives you wonderful almost white wooly foliage with deep purple thick flowers. To 2′ tall and 2′ wide in time this rounded evergreen shrub blooms for an incredibly long time beginning in early summer. Full sun and rich to average soil with light but consistent summer water.  Very easy to grow in our climate. Shear the spent flower spikes and cut into about 1/2″ new growth for a compact and more densely blooming habit. Excellent landscape plant, informal hedge or specimen in a border. This Lavender looks good year round- better winter appearance than most. Lightly deer resistant. Not their first choice but not 100% immune to browse either. Aromatic foliage. Wonderful white foliage contrasts greatly with deep green foliage for depth in plantings.

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This strain of our native Siskiyou Lewisia contains a stunning range of flower colors. Pink to orange to white to yellow and permutations in-between. One of our most cherished wild flowers this plant is found at high elevations in the southern part of the state. A succulent that forms an evergreen rosette it displays its flowers for literally months on end beginning in spring. Excellent, long blooming, easy to grow container plant but not difficult in the ground given rock garden conditions. Drainage is crucial, in average to enriched soil. Drought adapted but it blooms longer with light summer water. Full sun to very light shade. Excellent at the top of walls, spilling out of cliffs as it does in nature. To 6″ tall forming multiplying rosettes up to a foot across. Moderate deer resistance.  Oregon native plant.

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Bare stem biscuit root is a locally native perennial that is found in rocky dry areas among clumping native grasses. The stemless rosette bears upright entire glabrous blue leaves. 6″ stems rise up in late spring to earl summer with umbels of sulphur yellow flowers (sometimes purple). To establish, water thoroughly through the first month in the ground. Winter deciduous it emerges very early in spring. Loved by pollinators of all kinds. In the Willamette Valley this biscuit root grows in various biomes but is most common on dry hillsides. Festuca californica and Festuca roemeri are two native grasses seen with this plant in the wild. Full sun to light deciduous shade. Avoid standing water in winter. Long lived perennial once established. Excellent in gravel gardens.  Leaves remain handsome after blooming. Spreads slowly to form colonies. Locally native in the Portland city limits. Drought adapted when established. Moderate deer resistance.  Oregon native plant. 

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PNW Orange Honeysuckle is one of our most showy native vines. Our region is sparse on native vines so this pretty plant is welcome. In late spring to summer clusters of brilliant orange tubular flowers decorate the branch tips. Loved by hummingbirds as well as other birds which is obvious, its also important for all native pollinators. The flowers change to brilliant red fruit which is consumed  by wildlife and seldom lingers.  Deciduous mid green foliage is verdant all through the season. As with the vast majority of Honeysuckle vines this plant nearly always goes leafless at the base. Expect this and plan for it. Strongly twining plant to 12′ tall and almost as wide. Provide strong support. Light consistent summer water to establish then very little necessary once established. (Also accepts regular summer H20). Excellent vine for country fences, decorating mailboxes etc. Protect from deer, otherwise it is pest and disease resistant- occasional mildew in the autumn is virtually harmless – great news for a honeysuckle. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed after flowering.  Oregon native plant

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Probably the best looking and easiest to grow lily turf species for our climate. Tightly clumping deep green grasslike mounds of foliage are good looking YEAR ROUND- no scorching or freeze burn. To 8″ tall x 10″ wide eventually it thrives in quite a bit of shade to even sun if irrigation is consistent. Loves heavy clay soils and will happily live in standing water for part of the year. Established plants (1-2 years) are much more drought resistant even in full sun. The glossy leaves are just 3mm wide and 10cm long. In summer masses of white flowers appear within the foliage. These turn into masses of large, vivid sky blue berries which are showy well into winter. Excellent for massing (plant on 8″ centers) for a small scale ground cover. For this application it plays to amend the soil with compost and all organic fertilizer to speed growth and establishment. Excellent as a marginal plant near natural ponds and creeks. Very deer resistant. Native to eastern China.

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Excellent cold hardiness as well as AMAZING  pink to lacquer white new growth. This would make a perfectly stunning hedge. By late summer it settles down to a rich dark green. In October – December tiny white flowers have a sweet perfume. Slow growing to 5′ x 5′ in 6 years. Rounded dense form. Easily clipped. Excellent use as a windbreak or hedge. Good looking at all times. Appreciates any well drained site. Avoid standing water. Very drought tolerant when established. In time the leaves lose their prickles, mature foliage is smooth and glossy.  Easy and long lived. Wonderful plant.

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What a sweet little version of Holly Tea Olive. Leaves are tiny compared to the species and the whole plant is a diminuitive version of the that plant. To just 4′ x 4′ in 10 years it eventually gets progressively larger. An extremely floriferous form that condenses hundreds of small white fragrant flowers along the stems in October to December. Slow to finish in a container because of its size- be patient.  Grows about 4″ per year. Foundations, rock gardens, hedges, specimen. Great cold hardiness for a broad leaved evergreen. Drought adapted when established otherwise it tolerates regular irrigation which will eventually speed growth. Cute. Really, freaking cute ancient cultivar from Japan. Rare plant that is slow to increase. Limited quantities.

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Fantastic new hybrid Passion vine with impressively huge, spectacular flowers and a more restrained habit. 4″ wide brilliantly colored flowers feature deep blue and purple and white alternating stripes on the row of filaments that encircle the center. The sepals- petal like structure surrounding the flower alternated between white and lavender. To only 8′ tall in a season and remaining compact for all of its life. Happy evergreen vine that climbs by tendrils.- provide support. Small enough to find a long happy life in containers. Rich, well drained soil in full sun and a warm position. Evergreen to about 15ºF- the vast majority of winters. This passion vine has the largest flowers by far of any cold hardy selection. Truly beautiful and impressive. Flowers emit a light sweet scent and we have yet to see fruit produced. Loved by children and adults as well as the occasional butterfly. Blooms on the current seasons growth. Prune whenever you feel like its necessary- rare for this compact and easy vine.

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One of the very finest Pelargoniums or (Geranium- annual) with stupendous jagged foliage and vivid flowers. Each palmate leaf has a center of dramatic bronze and is outlined in bright chartreuse green. The star shaped hot orange flower is a bright and elegant contrast with this foliage. Compact growing habit. Excellent seasonal container subject or even bedded out. To 20″ x 20″ by the end of the summer. Rich, well drained soil with light consistent summer moisture. Remove spent flower spikes to tidy, encourage more. Moderately deer resistant. Avoid over watering. Easy, striking plant and our favorite Pelargonium.

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Sea Blush, or more commonly Rosy Plectritis is a locally native hardy annual in the Valerian family. In April-June it swarms meadows and glens with orbicular globes of dense fragrant pink flowers. They rise on average to about 10″ tall.  Rich soil will yield larger plants. Excellent bulb cover for late narcissus, tulips etc. Fun to grow heavily reseeding annual that also makes  a sweet cut flower. It can be found in the western third of the state. Also wonderful with Pacific Coast Iris as they bloom concurrently.  Sets seed and dies by mid summer when the spent carcasses may be removed- when doing that give them a shake where you want next years display to occur. Water to establish then none. Full sun to very light shade. New seedlings have diamond shaped true leaves with a rubbery texture. High deer resistance. Native in the Portland city limits.  Oregon native plant.

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Our selection of the tough and adaptable evergreen Yeddo Hawthorne. Each glossy, thick rounded leaf on this cultivar is wavy (undulate) and gives this smaller shrub extra substance. In spring large clusters of pure white flowers cover the whole plant. Often showy blue berries follow. Great resistance to black spot- the best of any we’ve grown. Full sun to very light shade in average to enriched soil. To 3′ x 3′ in 6 years. A long lived shrub that tolerates a great amount of summer drought but greets regular irrigation with equanimity.  A frequent component of Japanese style gardens for its simple and clean habit. Takes blasting heat very well, including blazing western exposures that are shady for most of the day. Cold hardy to 5ºF or briefly lower. Great low water landscape plant. Rose family- not deer resistant. Japan.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Coast gooseberry or black gooseberry is an intricately branched native deciduous shrub that is incredibly important to wildlife as well as pollinators. Mounding and spreading with fine and prickly needles housed at each node. The maple shaped leaves have a fine skunk aroma up close. To 4′ x 6′ in the extreme this moderately fast growing plant is best in full sun but can handle quite a bit of shade-especially deciduous shade. This species is never common and its found mainly west of the Cascades The small pendulous flower feature red petals surrounding a white corolla. These morph into prickly sour fruits whose final color ripens to black. Fall color is soft yellow to orange and brief. Light consistent summer water in a average to enriched, well drained soil. The berries are edible but intensely sour and make fine food for a wide range of cool birds. Native to the Portland city limits. Excellent shrub for remediation of wild sites. This pretty shrub makes a great transitional plant for wild areas and has a wild look itself. Blooms on wood from the previous season. Prune if needed AFTER flowering.      Oregon Native Plant

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With all the knock out, fleurshrubselekt® and every other patented type of rose its reassuring that this old gal still rocks them all. Betty bears clusters of slightly fragrant large single pink flowers. They are light pink w/ a slightly darker sheen to the surface of the petals which almost always open skyward. These upright facing groups of flowers yield not only a lot of color- it blooms constantly from May to frost, it gives the plant a wild appeal not seen in overly bred shrubs. The disease resistant foliage is mid green and handsome as well. To 4′ x 4′ forming a rounded shrub. It may be hard pruned in early spring if necessary. Remove spent flowers and more will quickly appear. Tough plant that gets by on a less than perfect watering regime.  Regular, deep watering (once a week max) will yield great performance. Established plants can take drought at the expense of re-blooming. Very easy to grow charming rose. Ultra cold hardy.

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Hard to believe that Rosemary has been officially lumped into the genus Salvia. (Sigh). Its still a wonderful shrub and this variety delights us with the MOST luminous blue flowers that we’ve seen on a hardy variety. The effect is similar to the slightly tender cultivar ‘Tuscan Blue’. Each flower is luminous and they obscure the leaves for most of winter into spring. Upright growing cultivar that spreads with time. To 4′ tall x 4′ wide in short order. Full sun and soil that drains with little summer water once established. It will take moderate irrigation as well but we like to rely on the iron clad drought resistance of this culinary herb. Mix with Arctostaphylos, Grevilleas for a shrubby winter blooming party. Very easy to grow. Nice informal or even clipped dense hedge. Develops a handsome gnarled trunk with time. Moderate deer resistance.

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Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
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This beautiful, deep sky blue flowered rosemary we found planted at a 100 year old farmhouse in Milwauke, OR. The flowers are scintillating and this plant- installed in the early 1980’s, has proven longevity as well. To 3′ tall by 5′ wide eventually. Blooms appear unabated from autumn to summer. Vigorous evergreen shrub with an upright and then spreading habit. Full sun and no water necessary once established. It can take light, regular water in summer as well. Otherwise, it thrives on only what fall from the sky. A very showy winter blooming shrub for hot locations, south facing hillsides, adjacent to walls, asphalt anywhere another less heat durable plant would fry. Moderate deer resistance. Pungently aromatic and great for culinary use. Prune- if needed, in late spring following bloom. Blooms on wood from the previous season. This variety would make an admirable upright, clipped hedge. Named by and for our friend Carol. Thanks Carol.

Xera Plants Introduction

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After almost 30 years of selling plants I can say that usually the first plant to go into a garden is Rosemary. And why not? It loves our climate. Its drought tolerant beyond measure and heck its even edible. And that fragrance. One thing you might not think of is winter flowers. This form from an ancient plant that has unique flowers. From September to June it is alight in clouds of soft violet blue flowers. Flowers all winter! Excellent as a specimen or hedge. This cold hardy variety can inhabit the coldest gardens. And my god there is always pork. To 3′ tall x 5′ wide in 10 years. Full sun and average soil that drains. Light to little summer water required. Moderate deer resistance.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
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Is this hardy? Why, yes, yes it is. Mexican Shellflower or just Tigridia is a fun bulb that produces large, immensely showy flowers that last but a day. Three large petals emanate from a wildly speckled center. White, red, orange, yellow, and pink flowers are all represented in this mix. Rich, well drained soil in a warm position- mine are on the south side of my house in average soil and they not only multiply year to year they self sow. The wonderful flowers appear individually for weeks in mid to late summer. Add a handful of all purpose fertilizer when planting and water consistently through bloom. Full sun- no fudging here. Very easy to grow. To 20″ tall in bloom on average. Flowers 3″ wide. -Emerges late in the spring- usually mid-May. Patience.

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Mules Ears are our native sunflowers. These cheery bold perennials make the transition of our wild flowers from spring into real summer. So named for its long leaves it forms very permanent spreading colonies in clay soils in habitat. The brilliant yellow sun flower blossoms rise up on sturdy stems directly from the ground. Each ebullient large flower is about 4″ across. Blooms appear from late April to early June. This plant usually finishes blooming just as summer drought commences. Its a memorable sight in wild meadows where it blooms simultaneously with native Rosa nutkana and Farewell to spring (Clarkia amoena var. lindleyi) and Giant blue eyed mary (Collinsia grandiflora). Wonderful cut flower and immediate and popular pollinator perennial. This plant was once very common in the Willamette Valley but civilization has immensely shrunk its native range. Good, long lived garden plant that goes summer dormant quickly after blooming has ended. The leaves turn gray and brittle and can easily be removed then. Give it a summer rest w/ little to no summer water once established. Full sun to very light shade. Water to establish its first season then none in subsequent years. Fun to grow and LONG lived. To 14″ in bloom forming a plant several feet across. Moderate deer resistance. Native to the Portland city limits.  Oregon native plant

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