Acaena ‘Blue Haze’

The blue form of New Zealand Burr with finely divided pinnate evergreen foliage that forms a vigorous creeping ground cover. In summer 3″ stems support round white flowers that appear for several weeks. Easy to grow dense-growing plant to 3″ tall and covering up to 3 square feet in a year. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer moisture to speed growth and keep the appearance fresh. Best in part shade to shade- seems to resent hot sun and permanently dry positions. Excellent for a fast cover that blocks weeds and roots as it grows- perfect erosion control for steep shady slopes. Plant on 1′ centers for a fast cover. Adaptable to dry conditions when established.

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Acaena inermis ‘Purpurea’

Such a good good plant. The purple-foliaged New Zealand Burr covers the ground in pinnate dark purple foliage. Low spreading evergreen ground cover for full sun to part shade in rich, well drained, moisture retentive soils. Avoid compacted dry soils- it will die out. Instead provide an annual mulch of compost- put it right over the leaves and let the foliage grow up through it. This will give you a dense spectacular ground cover in scintillating purple. Excellent as an understory in containers as well. In summer sporadic 4″ stems support spiky maroon orbs- these are the flowers. New Zealand.

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Acanthus mollis ‘Hollard’s Gold’

Bear’s Breeches is a standard perennial in our region for dry shady environs. And though the bold foliage is amazing we’ve been drawn to this form which turns it up a notch. Nearly 3′ long bold leaves are imbued with gold changing to acid green as the season continues. In early summer the fantastic white/mauve/grey chalice-like flower spikes rise to 4′ tall. Forms imposing clumps quickly in rich to average, well drained soil with light, consistent summer water. Takes dry conditions well and will actually resort to summer dormancy in extreme conditions. Evergreen to about 20ºF. Low deer resistance. Shines in the deepest shade.

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Acanthus mollis ‘Tasmanian Angel’

Variegated Bear’s Breeches or just plain old Acanthus with dramatically white-splashed leaves. There is great contrast between the white and the dark green sections of the leaves/stems. In summer this spreading perennial produces a 3′ spike with pure white flower bracts enclosing the pink flowers. Its a big ol party chalice of goodness. Not the hardiest Acanthus (yeah- that might be good). Plant in a protected location with RICH, well drained soil- add compost and all organic fertilizer. Completely deciduous in winter here. Each leaf extends to 2′ long with intricate indentation- aside from the variegation. To 3′ across eventually. Excellent plant for containers. Protect containers from temps below 15ºF (move to an unheated garage, porch). Emerges in mid-spring. Mulch the crown in autumn for the first few seasons.

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Acanthus syriacus

Outrageous Bear’s Breeches for hot and sunny aspects. Forms large rosettes of spiked intricate leaves that almost lay flat on the ground. In summer, enormous chalice-like soft purple blooms rise to 2′ tall. Each flower opens to reveal yellow petals. A beautiful combination. Full sun and rich, well drained soil with light summer water. Give this plant room and air circulation. It does not like to be crowded. Fully cold hardy and completely winter deciduous. Established plants can get by on less water. Moderate deer resistance. To 2′ wide in several seasons. Spectacular cut flower.

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Achillea millefolium

This is the locally native form of our wild yarrow. A rambunctious, easy to grow evergreen perennial for rough sites in well drained soil in full sun. Continuously from spring to autumn ‘umbels’ of pure white flowers rise 18″ above low spreading aromatic, finely divided ferny foliage. Most often it is green with variants that have gray foliage from time to time. Low water perennial that can even be used as a lawn substitute. A single plant spreads to several feet wide. Moderate deer resistance.  Butterflies oh the butterflies. Oregon native plant.

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Achillea millefolium ‘Calistoga’

A fine form of our native Yarrow that has leaves that are a striking gray with pure, clean white flowers. A great combination. Spreads to form a low wide plant that is evergreen (gray). The flat clusters of flowers appear continuously from May to frost. More consistently if you remove spent flowers. The umbels, unusual for the daisy family, are loved by butterflies. Well, actually all pollinators. They are given a flat landing pad and tons of flowers- what more could you want. Excellent for low care areas where this romping perennial will happily out compete weeds and hold ground with very light amounts of water. Full sun and well drained soil. its best to double dig the soil to incorporate oxygen and de-compact the soil. Does not like compacted soil. Light but consistent summer water speeds growth and vigor. Otherwise very drought tolerant. Excellent on slopes. To 20″ tall in bloom on a low spreading foliage plant to 2′ wide or wider. High deer resistance. Great cut flower. Mix with other low water plants. Pretty with other colors of yarrow. Oregon native plant.

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Achillea millefolium ‘Pretty Woman’

Of all the selections of our native yarrow this stands out for many reasons. The ‘umbels’ of flowers are a rich red which holds the color for an extended period. It fades only slightly to a rust red with time. Its vigorous and easy to grow. And it re-blooms reliably if spent flowers are removed. All the way until frost and sometimes longer. A very, very good long-lasting cut flower. To 18″ tall forming spreading colonies. Semi-evergreen. Low water when established in well-drained soils. Excellent to moderate deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Achillea millefolium ‘Salmon Beauty’

Yarrow is an unbeatable native perennial that blooms for a LONG time with a minimum amount of effort from the gardener. Foamy, ferny gray green leaves creates a low carpet of evergreen foliage. Rising up on 2′ spikes flat umbels of soft salmon flower create landing pads for pollinators. The flowers fade lightly after opening for a wonderful multicolor effect. Remove spent flowers, apply a little water and it will repeat bloom until frost. Best in lighter soils that are enriched but drain quickly. Best floral displays occur with light consistent summer water though it is very drought tolerant when established. Tolerates the toughest, hottest sites. Admirable if a little pungent cut flower. LOVED by pollinators. Creates a growing patch to several feet wide quickly. Blooms spring- autumn. Moderately deer resistant. Borders, dry borders, hell strips, etc. Oregon native plant.

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Acorus calamus ‘Variegata’

Nifty foliage perennial that can double as a terrestrial border plant (with regular water in rich, moisture-retentive soil) or submerged as a border perennial in a water pot or the edge of the pond. The majority of the spikey 3′ tall leaves are composed of cream/ivory streaks with dramatic stripes of deep green. The effect is ghostly and vivid from quite a distance away. Forms large spreading clumps in time. To 4′ wide when things are going well. Full sun to part shade. Flowers are not very conspicuous spikes that hide within the foliage. Completely winter deciduous- this is nice, it makes cleaning up in late winter/spring easy and and no fuss and the plant begins anew and fresh each season. Not bothered by pests. If sunk in a pond or water pot use heavy clay soil- like from the ground and mulch with a layer of gravel. Long lived plant. High deer resistance. AKA. Ghost Sweet Flag.

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Acorus gramineus ‘Golden Lion’

Is this the best form of golden sweet flag or what? We love the vivid yellow leaves on a dense and arching evergold perennial. Clumps densely but the foliage is born in fans and spreads out. To only 6″ tall but spreading to 1′ wide. Best in part shade and either permanently wet sites or regular consistent water. Mine makes a happy home on the north side of my house at the base of the rain gutter. Plenty of water in winter- and I don’t forget to water it in summer. Good appearance year round. In spring little off-white spikes serve as flowers. Native to permanently wet sites. Give it a bit of shade. Moderately deer resistant.

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Adiantum aleuticum

Western Maiden Hair Fern is native from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska south mainly through shady wet spots in the west south as far as Chiahuahua, Mexico. Its even locally native from Maryland to New Foundland. Its a long lived and vigorous fully deciduous perennial for perpetually wet sites. To 2′ tall and spreading almost indefinitely where conditions suite it. Heavy clay soil that retains consistent moisture in part shade to shade. Often found lining water falls in Oregon or in deep cool moist gullies. The multi fingered leaves are a soft green and are held erect on jet black stems. Very good sited at the bottom of a downspout. Very easy to grow given consistent moisture.  Oregon native plant.

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Adiantum venustum

Himalayan Maidenhair fern is one of our favorite groundcovers for shade and rich, moist soil. The divided fronds in the shape of an arrow are always soft and fresh. In spring this deciduous variety emerges with tones of amber and soft pink before taking on a mature soft green hue. These delicate leaflets are held on thin, wiry black stems to 10″ tall and it spreads prodigiously to form vast colonies. It doesn’t smother neighboring plants however, instead it seems to just flow around such woodland neighbors as Epimedium, Hellebores, even woodland bulbs like Erythronium. Regular summer water. Avoid hard, compacted dry soils. High deer resistance.

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Adiantum x tracyi

Cool hybrid between two California native maidenhair ferns that we love because its EVERGREEN! Finely divided soft green leaflets surprise as they sail through the toughest winter with little or no damage. A clumping variety that slowly increases over time in rich, moisture-retentive soil in part shade to shade. Adores moisture but can go much drier than most maidenhairs. To 10″ tall and as wide – then increasing. Lovely thing that works in woodlands to containers. Excellent naturally-occurring hybrid that deserves a place in our gardens. Moderate deer resistance.

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Aethionema grandiflorum

Sweet little evergreen shrublet with fine blue foliage. Atop a rounded form in spring, masses of light pink flowers are incredibly showy for such a diminutive plant. To about 8″ x 1′ forming a bun. This member of the brassica tribe is excellent in rock gardens or even on hot dry sunny slopes. Full sun and average, well drained soil. Light to little summer water. Blooms for 3-4 weeks in mid to late spring. Cut back hard after blooming- new blue foliage will flush out almost immediately. Troughs, rock gardens. Low care rock garden classic.

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Agapanthus ‘White Profusion’

Born and bred in the PNW this excellent compact and extremely floriferous white flowered Lily-of-the-Nile is a first rate selection. To 20″ tall and forming an expanding but compact clump. Flowers appear for 4-6 weeks in mid-summer. Clear, pristine white with abundant flower spikes. Full sun to very light shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Completely winter deciduous. Handsome pale green matte foliage. Long lived plant.

 

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Agapanthus ‘Xera’s Cobalt’

Our own seed strain taken from the very darkest blue flowers in the Agapanthus kingdom. Prolific blooming, long lived, cold hardy perennials that require rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Full sun to very light shade. Blooms of the deepest cobalt to black rise on average to 30″ tall for 4-6 weeks in mid-summer. Completely deciduous in winter. Wonderful in the middle/back of a border and a natural with ornamental grasses and Kniphofias. Hummingbird plant.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Agapanthus x ‘Stripes’

An excellent cold hardy Lily-of-the-Nile that was bred in the PNW. To 3′ tall in bloom from a low basal presence of strappy green leaves. Each flower in the truss is light blue with darker blue stripes. They are pretty up close- from a distance it reads as glowing baby blue. And you can use this luminosity to your advantage. Easy to grow perennial for full sun to very light shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. This cultivar performs even without regular water but the blooms last longer and are larger with it. Completely deciduous in winter.

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Agapanthus x ‘Summer Nights’

A northwest raised cold hardy selection with deciduous leaves and the most intense deep blue  flower spikes to 28″ tall in June and July. Full sun, well drained soil and regular water. Deciduous Agapanthus (REALLY) appreciate good soil. Combine with other perennials for love, joy. Best with regular summer irrigation and annual applications of organic fertilizer. Has been a long lived, long term performer in landscapes from Vancouver, BC to Medford , Oregon. Selected for intense deep blue flower color combined with excellent hardiness to cold.

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Cool bicolored Hummingbird Mint that has masses of flowers that appear from orange buds which quickly change to luminous light lavender when open. To 30″ tall and forming a clump this very, very, long blooming perennial is delightful for hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. A soft pastel coloration that pairs wonderfully with light yellow flowers and even blue. Great in seasonal containers. Blooms non-stop from June to October. Do not remove flower spikes as new flowers will appear continuously from the same spike. Rich, WELL DRAINED soil with light, consistent summer water. Its best to water Agastaches consistently during their first year in the ground- to establish a large root system. Ideal on slopes- to assist in drainage in winter. Double dig soil to incorporate lots of oxygen in the soil.  One of our favorite introductions. An amazing combination of flower colors on a single plant. Do not cut back until new growth has flushed out in spring and all threat of a hard freeze has passed.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Agastache ‘Berry Princess’

We believe this to be a cross inheriting some of the coloration of A. auranticus as well as A. cana. To 28″ tall this clump forming, everblooming perennial brings bright red buds that open to purple flowers. The colorful combination lasts all summer into autumn. New flowers are born on the same spikes so do not remove. Moderate consistent water through the first summer to establish. Double dig soil to incorporate oxygen into the soil and aid in irrigation to the roots. Established plants get by with a little less. Loved by hummers and  pretty decent cutfower as well. Full all day sun for best performance, will not be quite as floriferous in part shade. Sweetly scented foliage is an extra benefit. To 18″ wide and slowly increasing. Excellent on berms as well as slopes. Mulch in fall.  Small rosette of winter foliage is protected by the previous years defunct stems. Prune these away after all threat of a hard freeze has passed.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Agastache ‘Electric Punch’

One of our all-time best introductions ‘Electric Punch’ is a floral powerhouse of a hummingbird mint with exceptional adaptation to our cold and wet winters. Rising to 34″ tall in bloom, a clump can become enormous in rich, WELL DRAINED soil with light, consistent summer water. Also, accepts no water but with interruptions in bloom. Incorporate plenty of oxygen into the soil and slopes are ideal. Do not remove flower spikes during the season- new orange aging to pink flowers appear from the same inflorescence. Best to wait until spring to cut back the previous seasons defunct stems. Moderate deer resistance.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Agastache ‘Mandarin Dream’

This is our selection of an improved form of the species Agastache auranticus. It has deeper orange flowers on taller stems and exhibits excellent winter/cold/wet hardiness. To 30″ tall, the vivid blooms erupt from June to October. Tightly clump forming perennial whose tall wand-like stems require more horizontal room as well. Hummingbird Mint excels in very well-drained soils with consistent, light summer water. Full sun- you can fudge in light shade and still get results. Remove the previous seasons spent stems in March.

Xera Plants Introduction. 

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Agastache ‘Rainbow Sorbet’

One of our larger growing introductions this is a flowering machine with large individual flowers that open pale orange and senesce to pale pink. Overall this is a pastel flower palette. To 36″ tall and as wide in full sun and well drained soil with light, consistent summer water. Agastaches are excellent as container subjects- they will accept the most cramped roots and still perform. Wait until March to remove the previous years spent stems. Give this guy room. Hummingbird nirvana. Good winter hardiness.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Agastache ‘Xera Flame’

Our selection of a compact and free flowering cold hardy Hummingbird mint with intense dark orange flowers. Blooms June to October and they rise on spikes to 18″ tall. Does not flop- great for smaller spaces. Regular summer water in well drained, enriched soil. Excellent on slopes which improves winter drainage which increases cold hardiness. Full sun to very light shade. Irresistible to pollinators. Blooms appear from the same spikes all season- do not remove. Wait to cut it back until spring. Then remove dead top growth to make way for the new growth that is pushing from below.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Agastache pallida ssp. neomexicana

Cute flowering hyssop that makes a clump of strongly vertical stems clad at the tips with soft mauve/purple flowers. A boon to pollinators as well as hummingbirds. Blooms June to October continuously from the same spikes. To 18″ tall and barely half as wide. Agastaches like light soil. Double dig the soil well to incorporate oxygen and apply a handful of all organic fertilizer at planting. This will establish the plant much faster. Excellent performance on slopes where it achieves the drainage that it likes. Middle of the border or massed in a meadow- this easy to grow perennial performs for a long time. Do not cut back until after Valentine’s Day. Consistent water for the first summer then light water in subsequent years. Excellent performance in mixed container plantings. Moderate deer resistance. Foliage is sweetly pungent.

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Agave americana ‘Medio Picta Alba’

Tender <sigh> but perhaps the most spectacular variegated Agave. It makes a great container plant for LARGE containers. To 5′ x 5′, it grows a little slower in containers. Make sure it’s sturdy and well built too because this puppy has been known to grow so vigorously as to shatter its own home. Use well drained cactus mix and add a handful of all organic fertilizer. Move to a freeze free environment such as an unheated garage if temperatures threaten to drop below 20ºF. Otherwise move it to a dry place for winter- under a south facing eave is ideal. Move it back out in the open when rain dwindles.  Light summer water will speed growth. Leaves on this form are blue on the edges with a dramatic pure white stripe down the center. Wow.

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Agave bracteosa

Far and away the easiest Agave to cultivate in our climate and the handsome contorted sage green leaves are free of a deadly spike at the tip. Don’t be fooled, though. The leaves are lined in fine serrations that can cause a cut if you rub your person against them. To 3′ tall and as wide for very well-drained soils in full sun to very light shade. Amend the soil with pumice to sharpen drainage if needed. Ideally adapted to slopes. Good dimensions as a large focal point in a rock garden or clustered into clumps in the gravel bed. Accepts the highest reflected heat. Light summer water speeds growth.

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Agave harvardiana

Spikes! A very upright and pokey Agave with steel blue/gray foliage that forms large rosettes. To 3′ across eventually this cold hardy Agave demands excellent drainage but is worth the effort. VERY well drained soil- amend with liberal amounts of pumice and gravel. Excellent on a slope. Plant with the rosette tilted to shed winter water. Makes new pups happily and they will often come up quite a distance from the parent plant. To 3′ tall when up and established. Great in containers that you protect from winter wet. Move to a covered place in fall- a south facing eave is sufficient. Cold hardy below 0ºF- when established. Best to plant in March or April so that it has the longest possible season to develop a tap root going into its first winter. Light summer water to none. High deer resistance.

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Agave parryi ‘Flagstaff’

From the very far north end of this variable species range in Northern Arizona near—‘Flagstaff’. High elevation form that is found above 7000′ in the wild. Very cold hardy moderately large Agave. Full sun and very well drained soil. You must amend the soil with pumice and gravel to avoid wet accumulating around the crown in winter. This is made all the more easy by placing on a slope. The rosettes should be tilted to shed winter wet. Very stiff and sharply tipped steel blue leaves form a rosette that is at first upright then spreads out a little. Remove leaves from deciduous plants that collect in the rosette in autumn- they blow in from god knows where and leaving them can encourage rot. Excellent in containers. Move containerized plants under an eave or overhang to keep it dry in winter. No water required after initial establishment. Beautiful form of this cold hardy species. High deer resistance.

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Agave parryi ssp. couesii

A really pretty pale blue Agave with sharp angular leaves in a remarkably symmetrical rosette with age. Cold hardy and it requires very well drained soil in a hot position. A south facing slope is ideal in soil that has been amended with liberal amounts of pumice and gravel. And you should tilt the rosette so that water does not collect in winter. This variety is a little slower than others. Aside from perfect drainage it requires a little bit of heat and patience. To 20″ tall by 30″ wide in time. Great container subject- make sure the container is sturdy and large enough to accommodate both a spreading primary rosette and prolific pups which crowd the base. In time it can form bold colonies. Move containerized plants to a dry location in winter. Remove deciduous tree leaves that collect in the rosette in autumn to stave off rot. SW U.S. High deer resistance.

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Agave parryi ssp. neomexicana

New Mexico Agave is a spike wonder. Much more upright-growing than the species with sharp-tipped leaves that terminate in a blood red thorn. OW. Forms a very symmetrical plant with many leaves of steel blue. Full sun and VERY WELL-DRAINED soil. Excellent on hot slopes where it will tilt the rosette to avoid winter wet. Pups, heh, freely and you will soon have many rosettes. Amend the soil with pumice and gravel. Make sure there is plenty of air in the soil and no place where water could collect. Fantastic specimen plant for a dry garden/gravel garden. Water through the first summer to establish then none in subsequent years. Clean out the rosette when deciduous leaves collect in there- a shop vac works great. The leaves will cause rot when they decompose….so they must go. Great in containers- large, sturdy containers. Cold hardy. High deer resistance.

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Agave parryi ssp. truncata

Consistently one of the most successful Agaves for gardens in our region. Soft gray rosettes have leaves with a distinct upright habit. At the tips of the wide leaves is a single (deadly) black thorn. Very nice. Full sun and very well drained soil with little to no summer water when established. This Agave requires soil that is never soggy- amend heavily with pumice and gravel to create air pockets. Plant this (and all) hardy Agaves in our climate on a tilt. The tilted rosette sheds rainwater and it keeps it much drier in winter. Ideally, this Agave should be sited on a hot, south facing slope. In autumn deciduous leaves from (everywhere) seem to blow into the rosette and collect. You must remove these immediately so that they do not rot the center of the plant. A shop vac works wonders…so do bar-B-Q tongs. Excellent in containers. Its best to plant hardy Agaves in early spring to early summer. They require a long season to develop a tap root which in turn ensures that they are cold hardy. No tap root and not so hardy. Hardy below 0ºF when dry. Highly deer resistant.

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Agropyron magellanicum

Blue wheat grass from Chile/Argentina is perhaps the bluest grass that we can grow. Clump forming ultra blue upright then arching grass that is good looking all the time. It virtually glows in a landscape provided rich, well-drained soil in full sun with regular and consistent summer moisture. Does not like to dry out and conversely it resents a boggy situation. To 20″ tall and forming a clump almost as wide. Great performance in containers. Loves the Oregon coast. Do not cut back wholesale- instead tidy by removing tattered, discolored leaves in early spring. Avoid reflected heat. Moderate deer resistance.

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Alchemilla alpina

Our friend Anna Kulgren shared this handy and pretty little perennial ground cover with us. Palmate grass green foliage is lined in fine silver fur- very pretty for this hardy deciduous plant. In spring clusters of chartreuse flowers foam above the plant. Full sun and rich, well drained soil. To just several inches high (if that) it spreads happily to several feet wide. Just aggressive enough to  out compete weeds.This would be a great low plant between pavers. Also, at the foot of borders or  along paths. Simple, easy to grow plant.

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Probably one of our very favorite bulbs and a gift from a friend w/ VERY good taste and I’m happy to say we are going to have a steady supply in the future. For the moment quantities are limited. Why so special? This is the enormously huge version of that precious blue allium caeruleum. Flower size on the species which is very available are comparable to a nickel to a quarter size. This form cranks it up w/ flowerheads the size of golf balls and larger. Spectacular. This very rare form is so superior and still charming that I’ve put it all over my garden. It needs full sun and rich soil that drains. Not difficult by any stretch- though full sun is required. and I suspect more water than I give mine. I put one in then 3, then like 9 and I had to stop myself. Sky blue orbs. This plant needs to build up some bulk to bloom, which means you need a certain amount of leaves and bulb heft for them to bloom. I say this because its possible to sell them out of bloom because they are that freaking cool. <pant, pant> Semi evergreen leaves are low, thin and pungent. Possibly deer resistant- I don’t know yet. And bunnies. Well, Bunnies suck.

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Allium schoenoprasm

Chives! Everyone needs these easy to grow, long-blooming, edible perennials in their garden. Late spring brings stems clad in rich lavender/purple flowers that are spicy and wonderful in salads. Cut back at any time and a new crop of tasty leaves will appear. To 18″ tall and forming clumps. Full sun and virtually any soil with consistent summer water. Moderate deer resistance. Often seeds around. These are easy to identify and dispatch or share with friends. A first-rate flowering border perennial as well. Winter deciduous.

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Allium sikkimense

Blue is an elusive color in Alliums but there are several that achieve that hue. This small bunch forming onion is a delight with clusters of nodding blue flower in mid-late summer. To 10″ tall a multiplying clump will spread to 1′ wide over time. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Excellent in rock gardens, the front of borders and even hellstrips. Very easy to grow herbaceous perennial that blooms for 4-6 weeks. Cute little cutflower and loved by pollinators. Winter decidiuous for full sun- no fudging here. Long lived and hardy in containers. Moderate deer resistance.

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Aloe striatula

We’ve grown a lot of Aloes with purported cold and wet hardiness and this is the one that has been the most successful. A large succulent shrubby plant with rosettes of deep green succulent foliage. In late summer to autumn a showy display of large yellow flower spikes can occur. Very pretty and loved by all nectar seeking folks. Give this South African perennial VERY GOOD DRAINAGE in full sun and a warm position.  A slope is always helpful. Amend the soil with plenty of gravel and sand as well as compost- these guys do need to eat- so a little handful of organic fertilizer is recommended. Capable of freezing to the ground (below 15ºF) and resprouting from the base when truly warm weather arrives. Plant on a south or west facing slope preferably against a warm wall or boulder for added reflected heat. Easy, if large, container plant that you should protect from temperatures in the teens. To 3′ x 3′ on average in our climate. Mostly evergreen here. Combine with Agave, Cactus which will also increase their growth rate if you provide light, consistent water during hot weather.

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Alstroemeria ‘The Third Harmonic’

A good Alstro is hard to find. The dwarf varieties are ever plagued by snails/slugs, Many of the most exquisite varieties (patented) are poor garden performers, lacking vigor or something. Enter this most fave cultivar. First of all its orange and many will confuse it with the more diminutively flowering A. aurantiacus which can become an ineradicable weed. THIS IS NOT THAT. Its a polite clumper with enough vigor to send up fully 30″ flowering stems repeatedly for up to 6 weeks in summer. Speaking of which the individual flower will last up to two weeks in a vase. Do not cut them (which injures the plant – it bleeds out) rather gently rock the base of the stem back and forth to detach. This will help and not hurt it. Regular summer irrigation in rich, moisture retentive soil. Winter deciduous. To 2′ wide..

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Alstroemeria psittacina ‘Variegata’

A really multidimensional perennial for part shade, rich soil and light summer water. The sage green, almost rubbery textured leaves are emargined in creamy white. In summer, 2′ spikes support groups of tubular red and green flowers. The interior of the flower is decorated with black hatch marks on a white backdrop. Fantastic long lasting cut flower that should be pulled gently from the base to detach and never cut with a pruner. Spreads somewhat thinly  to cover some ground. Posses the ability to compete with other plants and can happily coexist with shorter ground cover- flower spikes coming up right through. Completely winter deciduous. Bait for slugs when it first re-emerges in spring. Once its up a bit you are safe.  Long lived cold hardy  perennial that is pretty permanent. Hummingbirds love the flowers as much as stylish gardeners.

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Amsonia hubrichtii

Threadleaf Bluestar is a fantastic native North American perennial with many seasons of interest. To 4′ tall this strongly clump-forming perennial has thread-like green leaves that line the sturdy, very vertical stems. Upon rising in late spring they host clusters of star shaped, fragrant (yep) blue flowers. Very pretty. The green, fine-textured foliage holds space as a blowsy presence in borders, gravel gardens, hellstrips. In autumn the entire plant turns shocking yellow and stays that way for weeks. Fall color at ground level and it rocks. Light but consistent summer water to aid in establishment. Very drought tolerant then. Full sun in any soil type but for permanently boggy. Good deer resistance. They will try it once but not again- for what it’s worth. Completely deciduous in winter.  Emerges mid-spring. Very long lived, no-fuss perennial. Mix with ornamental grasses, cacti, just about anything.

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Alkanet, Italian Bugloss- neither name is very appealing but I’m here to testify that if you are a connoisseur of the color blue this big showy perennial is for you. To 4′ tall multiple spikes bear rich, deep, true blue flowers in one bodacious cloud. This form is not only a superior blue, but its a more reliable perennial. Most live 2-3 years but this often persists for longer. This borage forms a basal rosette of rough leaves- this is important to identify the inevitable seedlings- they are dark, dark green and spiny. Blooms first year from seed. A Spectacular plant for a young garden, a dry garden, wild border or in its most classic home the cottage garden. Full sun and average to enriched soil that drains quickly. Light consistent water to establish then drought adapted. Long, long blooming plant that often has bumble bees fast asleep in the cup shaped flowers. Very cool. Obvious pollinator gem. Very climate adapted plant.

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Anemanthele lessoniana

Pheasant Tail Grass is a clumping large arching grass with colorful surprises throughout the year. To 30″ tall and a little wider the army green arching foliage takes on dramatic orange and red tints if given just a little stress. In summer fine tawny orange/brown glossy seedheads arch gracefully within the foliage. Full sun to very light shade in rich, well drained soil with consistent summer moisture- a little dryness and wham! You get those fiery tints. Requires a protected location in gardens, avoid full on exposure and cold winds. Its best application though is as a large graceful container subject. And the drainage adds to cold hardiness. Remove seedheads before they mature as it does like to seed around. Mulch for arctic weather. Moderate deer resistance. New Zealand.

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Anemone nemorosa ‘Alba Plena’

Excellently climate adapted, there are many forms of Anemone nemorosa but this is by far our favorite. Pure white flowers with a congested bunch of petals in the center. Natures pin cushion. Blooms late March to early May. Spreads  to form large colonies in rich well-drained soil with ample irrigation. The whole plant goes completely dormant by summer, cleanly disappearing before you have time to notice it. Part shade to full sun. Not bothered by pests or animals. Even though it goes summer dormant it’s still beneficial for these plants to receive regular water. You’ll notice the difference the following spring.

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Anemone x lipsiensis

Delicate in appearance but actually pretty tough and long lived, this pale yellow-flowered Anemone spreads to form large colonies. To 5″ tall and blooming from March to April. Remains in bloom for several weeks. Rich, well drained soil that retains moisture. Goes completely dormant by the arrival of hot weather- still keep watering – Anemones appreciate that even though they are fast asleep. Very pretty as a color echo with golden foliage such as the acid yellow emerging foliage of Hakonechloa (Japanese Forest Grass).

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Angelica pachycarpa

A short-lived perennial that has definitely caught our attention. Impossibly glossy green foliage appears as if someone applied a layer of lacquer. The first season, it forms a rosette of these beautiful divided leaves. The following season the whole plant rises up to bloom to 3′ tall. Giant umbels of shocking acid green are produced. A beacon to pollinators, flower arrangers, garden designers and everyone who has impeccable taste. Remains in bloom for up to two months. Average lifespan 3-4 years. Full sun to part shade in rich soil with regular summer water. Sets a LOT of seed.

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Anigozanthos flavidus

A customer of ours from the N. Oregon Coast (Gearhart) brought us divisions of the large, green-flowered Kangaroo Paw species. It had thrived in her garden there for 20 years and formed a huge patch. She had divisions aplenty. We’ve since found that it isn’t quite hardy inland but it’s still a durable, cool, long-blooming plant. Easy container plant that you can protect if the temperature threatens to drop below 20ºF. In summer they send up 4′ spikes with their green, curiously fuzzy paw-shaped flowers. They remain in bloom for weeks. Full sun and fertile well-drained soil with regular water. Easy to divide. Multiples quickly.

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Anthriscus ‘Ravenswing’

Deeply colored foliage and clusters of white umbel flowers combine to give this easy to grow biennial an important place in the garden. The finely divided leaves are almost black but have a bluish hue on the surface that reflects the light in opalescent waves. The first year it produces only this gorgeous foliage. Combine with chartreuse/gold leaved perennials and/or shrubs for excellent contrast. In the second season the foliage extends and masses of pure white umbels wave to 3′ tall above the plant. Light and airy which is cool for a plant with deep, brooding foliage. Self sows prolifically and the seedlings are easy to spot, move, thin, dispatch. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, moisture-retentive soil with light but consistent summer moisture. Excellent in woodlands or sunny borders. It makes a surprisingly good cut flower as well. Umbels…these days its all about umbels. Winter deciduous.

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Anthyllis vulneraria var. coccinea

Kidney Vetch is a playful, short-lived perennial with shocking red flowers that come in clusters much like clover. Low, spreading plant that hugs the ground, all the better to see the piercing red flowers on this form. Seeds prolifically, and the seedlings are both easy to identify as well as move or dispatch. To 3″ tall by 18″ wide, when very happy. Loved by pollinators. Forms a vivid patch of color in the most unlikely places. Seeds germinate in autumn and bloom commences in spring. Excellent little nitrogen-fixing temporary plant for new gardens. Enriches soil in a wonderful way. Light to little summer water.  Mediterranean.

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Antirrhinum sempervirens

Cute little perennial Snapdragon species native to the mountains adjacent to the Mediterranean. Gray-green, almost succulent foliage is lush and is great with the profuse white snapdragon flowers which appear from late spring to mid summer. Full sun and rich to average, well-drained soil. Light summer water. Gets by with none but doesn’t look as good. Dies completely to the ground in winter and quickly resprouts from the base in spring. Rock gardens, gravel gardens, borders, hellstrips.

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Aquilegia formosa

Western Columbine is a wonderful native wildflower that forms almost permanent colonies in part shade. 20″ stems support pendant flowers of vivid orange and yellow. Blooms April-June. Rich, well-drained sites that retain moisture in part shade.Little summer water once established. Finely divided, blue-green leaves are pretty as well. Excellent perennial for naturalizing in part shade and cool environs. Long-lived when established. Oregon native plant.

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Aquilegia longissima ‘Long Spurred’

Stunning columbine native to the American SW that we cherish for its huge flowers trailed by improbably long tails held against blue foliage. Easy to grow late spring bloomer that thrives in many soil types in part shade to full sun with regular summer irrigation. To 14″ tall and becoming a long lived perennial. Winter deciduous. Mix with gold foliaged plants for high contrast- a flower color echo. Easy to grow.

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Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Icy Blue’

Columbines are a blast to grow in the garden. This form we initially selected for its bright, bright, bright chartreuse yellow foliage. The brightest we have seen. In April to June it’s topped with multiple white/green flowers that slowly age to a soft, luminous blue over several days. Very pretty contrast with the foliage and an excellent bold perennial for contrast in a border. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, well-drained soil with consistent summer moisture. When flowers are over you can take advantage of the brilliant leaves. Solidly perennial and the original plant still survives. (We isolate this plant to ensure the babies are as true to the name as possible- and yes it does work).  To 20″ tall and half as wide. Self sows and a large percentage of the seedlings are gold. Easy to spot.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Aquilegia x ‘Xera Tones’

A little wacky columbine sex in our nursery between our native orange and yellow flowering Aquilegia formosa and the brown and green flowered (and fragrant) Aquilegia viridiflora. The color range of the flowers is truly insane. And many of them are fragrant. They also have inherited the very good leaves of A. formosa- which are decidedly blue and delicate looking. They appear to be long lived perennials just as their parents and you just know that these buggers are going to reseed themselves. Part shade to full sun with regular water.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Aralia californica

Elk Clover. Our native large herbaceous Aralia that forms large, tropical-looking clumps along moist places in the central southern part of the state. To 8′ tall and as wide when established in rich soil  with an adequate summer moisture supply. A native plant that takes very well to cultivation. In summer 2′ long spikes reveal white orbs. Showy and a little exotic for a native as well. This is a great large scale plant for tropical effects- mix with Hardy Banana (Musa basjoo) and you have got yourself a big bold look. Black berries follow the flowers and are somewhat showy as well. Completely winter deciduous. Oregon native plant.

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Arisaema ringens

Cobra lily or Jack in the Pulpit from Japan with exotic striped flowers in mid-spring but the bold and glossy foliage steals the show. Forming large patches in rich, WELL DRAINED soil with regular summer irrigation. Shade- protect the amazing leaves from blasting sun. They will stand prominently up to 2′ tall- triple lobed, glossy and good looking. One of the more reliable of the genus. Mix with other bold shade perennials. Mulch with compost annually. Disappears entirely in winter. A Xera favorite perennial.

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Arisaema sikokianum ‘Silver Leaf Form’

We sowed the seed and I’ll be damned if hundreds came up. This remarkable form of one of our favorite Jack in the Pulpits. Deep brown hoods host an interior spathe of pure white It looks like a little ghost rising up. Adorable. The large trifoliate leaves on this form are marked on the interior with a zone of silver. All together a fantastic look for a woodland perennial that requires deep, rich, well drained soil and ample summer moisture. Shade. Emerges late in spring- be patient and the way the bulb grows underground it means that it can wander a bit each year. Multiples when happy to form clumps. Completely winter deciduous. To 20″ tall.

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Artemesia versicolor ‘Seafoam’

Lovely, soft gray curls make up the foliage of this low spreading perennial. Easy to grow and long lived plant for full sun and well drained soil. Little summer water when established. Takes the hottest aspects with aplomb and remains good looking all season. At the end of summer stems extend to produce small white flowers. Not really showy but it expands the overall texture of the plant. Completely winter deciduous. Cut back hard in early spring. Forms woody stems at the base and is a quite permanent plant. Flows in and around other plants gracefully. Moderate deer resistance. To 1′ x 3′ in a season.

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Arthropodium maculatum ‘Purpureum’

AKA Arthropodium maculatum ‘Candidum’ New Zealand Rock Lily. Intersting clump forming lily relative that has fine strappy leaves in a dense configuration that are dotted with brown over a madder red overlay. Wonderful little foliage plant for part shade in rich, moisture retentive soil. In summer masses of 4″ stems support clouds of tiny nodding white flowers. Fun. Rock gardens, the front of borders, massed together for a more profound effect. To about 10″ wide. Completely winter deciduous. Nice summer container plant.

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Aruncus dioicus

Goats Beard is a big bold and easy to grow perennial for part shade and perpetually wet sites. To 4′ tall and as wide with large fountains of pure white flowers in late spring to early summer. Native in seeps and along watercourses, mimic those conditions in your garden and you’ll have success. Long lived plant that develops a woody base. Completely winter deciduous. Fall color is often yellow. Widespread in the PNW. Oregon native plant.

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Asarina procumbens

Soft looking creeping perennial for rich, well drained soils in light shade. Large furry leaves consort beautifully with the pale yellow snapdragon shaped flowers on this 6″ x 1′ wide herbaceous perennial. Excellent in rock gardens, containers with protection from the hottest sun. LOVES cultivation in rich, well drained soils. Admirably long lived container perennial that is also very long blooming June to frost. Regular summer water. Completely winter deciduous.

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Asarum splendens

As a dry shade evergreen ground cover foliage plant this wonderful perennial excels. Large heart shaped leaves are marked with silver over a sage green background. Pretty. Spreads to form dense colonies in rich, well drained soil in part shade to full shade. Must have regular water for the best appearance but can endure very dry conditions by wilting and will quickly recover with a drink. Takes the most dense shade and is invaluable in planters, beds, containers that are sited under an overhanging roof. Great winter appearance- it should be used in all sorts of year round containers more often. Spreads underground by stolons but doesn’t travel far. Bait for snails and slugs. Small curious brown flowers occur at ground level under the foliage in summer. To 6″ tall and spreading in ideal conditions to several feet wide.

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Asclepias fascicularis

Native Oregonian butterfly weed that has a great wildflower demeanor and is just as attractive to pollinators as well as Lepidoptera (butterflies). Full sun and well drained soil, though it accepts clay soil on slopes that are strictly unwatered in summer. To 22″ tall and making a clump in time. Mix with fine textured ornamental grasses, tall spiky perennials. Light summer water. Flower color is most often creamy white but ranges to light pink. Often seen on road cuts and in ditches in the Willamette Valley. Blends in with grasses and other plants but pollinators find it no matter what. Nice cutflower. Important food source for Fendler’s Blue Butterfly which is very endangered and locally indigenous. Winter deciduous. Oregon native plant.

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Asclepias speciosa

This widespread species is native to selected spots in the Willamette Valley and occupies dry rocky hillsides in full sun. Huge spreading perennial that requires pre-planning and some real estate. Gray green stalks and leaves rise up to about 4’tall and bear deliciously fragrant pink orbicular flowers. These are irresistible to butterflies, including Monarchs, and if you want one to visit your garden this plant is good insurance. However, all butterflies find it irresistible. Spreads underground vigorously by stolons and can come up quite a way from the initial clump. Full sun and well drained soil. Completely winter deciduous and emerges relatively late in spring. Be patient. Oregon native plant.

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Asclepias tuberosa

Common butterfly weed native to the central parts of the continent makes a striking long blooming perennial in our gardens. To 2′ tall flat cymes of brilliant orange flowers appear in July and re-bloom until frost. Emerges late – not until May and then rockets out of the ground and almost immediately commences blooming. Fantastic plant for all pollinators. Remarkably showy perennial for very well drained soil- try a slope and deep but infrequent irrigation or add a few handfuls of pumice to the planting hole. Mine thrives in the heat and rigors of my hellstrip. completely deciduous in winter.- its good to remember where you planted it. Butterflies, Oh the god damned butterflies.

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Asphodeline lutea

You don’t see this perennial from the middle east very often in our gardens. Its a great, low water long lived plant with dramatic, showy flowers. Spikes to 4′ tall are clouds of large starry yellow fragrant flowers. Blooms appear in May and June and are showy for weeks. Grassy blue green leaves form a clump at the base. Rich, well drained soil with little to no summer water once established. Mass for a very showy effect. Remove spent flowers and you are left with relatively good looking low arching blue green leaves. Must have full sun and a bit of patience to bloom. We try to sell them in bloom to avoid the wait. Moderate deer resistance. Winter deciduous. Long lived.

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Aspidistra elatior

Cast Iron Plant. Once you realize how incredibly useful and uniformly good looking this perennial of dry shade is- its as if there has been an awakening. Upright wide then tapered deep green evergreen foliage is famous for its ability to thrive in dust dry black shade. Well, its more adaptable than that. It makes a great evergreen texture, presence in any shady setting. It really does require protection from bright hot sun- it will discolor the leaves and recovery is a long slow process. To 2′ tall and forming a slowly spreading clump to several feet wide in a half dozen years. In summer brown, round flowers resemble pepperoni and appear at soil level. Curious. Well known as a houseplant its time to use it more in our gardens. Containers, sites in dense shade. Great winter appearance. To speed growth plant in enriched, well drained soil and water diligently during the heat of summer. Long lived plant.

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Astelia chathamica

Silver Spear. Dramatic silver green monocot spikey plant that we adore for container culture. To 3′ tall and dense the rosettes produce long silvery spiky leaves at a moderate pace. Full sun to light shade in rich, well drained soil. Not completely hardy in Portland, it freezes out at about 18ºF- and containers should be protected over the winter- move into an unheated place. Rich, soil, regular irrigation which speeds growth. In the ground you must choose the most protected urban site possible. Then mulch and cover with an opaque sheeting when temperatures threaten to dip below 20ºF. In town that is about once every four years. It can freeze back quite a way but recovery is dubious and slow at best. Excellent performance at the Oregon Coast where it is a permanent landscape plant.

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Astelia nivicola ‘Red Gem’

Smaller growing Silver Spear that forms spreading colonies in part shade, rich soil and a protected location. Red tinted silver arching evergreen perennial that requires protection form hot dry conditions in summer and subfreezing winds in winter. To 8″ tall and twice as wide. Excellent in containers, protect containers from temperatures below 20ºF. This has been a long term performer in protected urban environments. Cover if temperatures threaten to drop below the upper teens. Added protection can’t hurt. Regular summer water speeds the increase of the clump. Handsome plant. Try it in a protected woodland- you’ll like it. Trust me. Heh. Wonderful performance at the Oregon Coast.

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Astelia nivicola ‘Westland’

Much hardier to cold but quite a bit smaller this Astelia has thrived in Portland gardens for years. Part shade and rich, moisture retentive soil that drains well is ideal. It seems to adore unamended loam as well. Rosette forming monocot with silver leaves that have a distinct red tint. Avoid blasting hot dry situations- this species hates that. Spreads slowly to form showy evergreen patches. Mix in borders, among shrubs- which adds winter protection or in containers. Protect containers from temperatures below 20ºF. In the ground it is hardy in to the low teens. With a little added extra protection- remay, leaves, even a dry towel during arctic events and it it will take lower. Little spikes of green flowers occasionally transfer into bright orange fruits. To 1′ x 1′ slowly. Regular summer water.

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Athyrium x ‘Ghost’

A hybrid fern discovred in Oregon and it has become a garden staple. Soft gray/sage green intricately divided fronds arch out from a central rosette. To 2′ tall and as wide in rich, well drained moisture retentive soil in part shade to shade. Loves regular irrigation and bulks up more quickly then. More adaptable than its harder to grow parent Japanese painted fern. Completely deciduous in winter. Takes poorly drained sites.

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Beesia deltophylla

Still relatively new this extraordinary perennial has so many fantastic attributes it will become indispensable in our gardens. Glossy concave heart shaped leaves emerge tinted black before settling to a deep forest green. The dense foliage is seldom bothered by pests and appears to be slug/snail resistant. Throughout the growing season 2′ spikes emerge over the dome of dense foilage with small white flowers. The over effect is cool sophistication in the shade garden. Slowly expanding to 2′ wide. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular summer irrigation. Mix with Hosta, Hakenochloa, Epimedium. Semi-evergreen.

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Begonia boliviensis

This species is one of the progenitors of modern Tuberous- non-stop Begonias. In of itself a tough perennial that if you are patient will make an appearance year after year. To 1′ tall (slightly taller) angel wing shaped bold green leaves are a wonderful backdrop to the masses of striking orange/red flowers that appear from July to October. Each of five petals recurves as it opens to an elegant effect. Very easy to grow as a container plant. To over winter simply let the plant die back in late autumn and move the container to a sheltered site. Mine goes against the wall of a covered outside patio and in 15 years I’ve never lost a plant. Grows surprisingly well in the ground in well drained rich soil in part shade. Be aware that returning plants emerge late – Often not showing their presence above ground until mid-June. Best with an annual application of organic fertilizer. Regular water, but never permanently boggy. Excellent performance in our climate. The outrageous amount of flowers produced make this plant a regal winner.

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Begonia grandis ‘Heron’s Piroutte’

Cold hardy Begonia that we love as a dependable and pretty late blooming perennial. Large wing shaped leaves have a reverse of light red. In late summer to early autumn to 30″ tall upright plants produce pendant clusters of pink/off white very showy flowers. Rich moisture retentive soil in part shade to shade. Great long lived plant for borders, shady glens. the shadows of ponds. Disappears entirely in winter. On occasion bulbils that appear in the leaf axils will detach and produce new plants. Move easily or share with friends. Not bothered by snails/slugs.

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Bergenia ciliata ‘Susan Riley’

To be honest we had quite a bit of employee pushback when we said we were growing a Bergenia- I’m sure they immediately thought of that hulking, horrible looking, weevil notched ground cover with clouds of pepto pink flowers in winter/spring. That old horribly abused plant is definitely not this. HUGE round leaves have light fur on the reverse and make a wonderful statement in part shade to full sun (with water). In very early spring this cultivar named by Richie Steffan of the Elizabeth Miller Garden in Seattle- sends up wide inflorescences of pink tinted white flowers. Best with overhead protection of trees to ensure a late freeze doesn’t damage the flowers. This is a DECIDUOUS species and doesn’t seem to be root weevil food or suffer a bad looking period. New leaves ensure freshness all season. Give it a LOT of room to spread. Tropical looking foliage adds bold dimension to borders, woodlands. Regular summer water in well drained rich soil. Thanks Richie.

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Berkheya purpurea

Fascinating daisy from South Africa with intensely thorny, conspicuously ridged stems and throughout summer a long display of large light purple to white daisies. The interior of the flower is much darker than the petals and provides great contrast. Each 4″ wide flower faces outwards and is easy to see. To 30″ tall from a slowly spreading clump. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Drainage is important but so is good care during summer to establish an extensive root system. Excellent on sunny slopes. Add a yearly application of compost to spur vigor and blooms. Full sun to very light shade. All together a very spectacular perennial. Worth the effort to make it happy. Very unusual cut flower. Completely winter deciduous. Rated as zone 6, In our observations over the years it is more like the low end of zone 7. Mulch in autumn. Moderate deer resistance.

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Berlandiera lyrata

The so called Chocolate Daisy of the great plains we love for the sweet chocolate scented yellow daisy flowers in summer. Forms a rosette of humble green leaves and then repeatedly in summer it sends up the wonderfully scented flowers on long stems to 1′ high. Full sun and well drained soil of average to rich fertility. Regular summer water encourages more bloom but it takes dry conditions when established. Rock gardens, gravel gardens, borders, containers. To 18″ wide when happy. Full all day sun. Lifespan: 3-5 years in our experience in Oregon. The yellow petals surround a soft green center- makes a nice scented cut flower.

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Blechnum penna-marina

Antarctic Water Fern is a low creeping evergreen ground cover fern for moist shady sites. To just 5″ tall the new fronds emerge a bright red before settling to soft green. The pointed finely divided leaves overlap densely creating a cover that blocks weeds. Slowly expands up to 3′-4′ wide when really happy. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular summer water. Avoid compacted dry clay- does not like. Easy to grow in woodlands, Excellent performance under large shrubs. Avoid hot sun. Good small scale shady ground cover. High deer resistance. Chile.

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Blechnum spicant

Deer fern is a lovely native evergreen clumping perennial that is invaluable in wild areas. The tiered upright and then settling to horizontal mid green glossy fronds are handsome all the time. To 2′ wide and 2′ tall (when fronds are emerging). Rich, moisture retentive soil high in organic matter. Light summer water in part shade to shade. Familiar fern of the Oregon Cascades but very widespread. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Bouteloua gracilis

Mosquito Grass or Gramma Grass is a widespread native of the interior west. Slowly spreading to form substantial clumps of fine light green/gray leaves. To 18″ tall the funny flowers born at the tips of the fine stems feature a horizontal inflorescence- to me it resembles a little blond mustache. Blooms appear in midsummer and are attractive well into fall. Full, hot sun and rich to average well drained sites. Mass for a fine textured effect of a blowsy low meadow. In autumn as it enters dormancy it retains a dried  to cere presence deep through winter. It may be cut back hard in spring. Light summer water though extremely drought tolerant when established.

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Calamagrostis foliosa

Mendocino Reed grass is a regal plant from the northern California coast. Well scaled for gardens a 1′ x 2′ wide clump eventually forms with stiff, tidy blue green arching leaves that are blue with purple highlights. In spring to mid-summer 1′ tall spikes of flowers that begin russet and age to soft tan appear and are immensely showy and symmetrical. A back lit plant in bloom is a festival of brilliant tones. Best in light shade and average to rich, well drained soil with light summer water to improve vigor and appearance. A cool season grass that looks wonderful in winter as well as summer. Excellent garden plant that has proven to be easy and adaptable. Evergreen.

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Calamintha nepeta ‘Montrose White’

Wow- one of the best perennials that we grow. Easy to grow, so useful, pretty and even a nice edible that we enjoy in summer iced teas. A dome shaped perennial that is virtually everblooming. Clouds of tiny white flowers are absolutely LOVED by pollinators of every kind. A well grown clump in bloom is a buzzing fountain of activity. Blooms May to September unabated. Full sun, rich to average well drained soil with light but consistent summer irrigation. Full sun. The fine white clouds of flowers work well as filler in borders or as a low cloud supporting taller flowers. Winter deciduous. Loved by the kitties. To 2′ tall and 2′ wide in a single season. Cold hardy and low water. Exceptional plant.

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Campanula garganica ‘Dickson’s Gold’

Not many Campanulas that we really taking a liking to but this one is distinctly different. Low mounds of scintillating gold foliage become a sea of light purple/blue star shaped flowers in May-June. Part shade to shade with protection from hot sun. Rich, WELL DRAINED soil that is fertile and regular summer water. Apply a handful of organic fertilizer around it in spring- this perks up vigor and ramps up bloom. Striking plant for a shady rock garden or the front of a woodland border. A great combination of colors in one compact plant. To 5″ tall x 1′ wide in a season.

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Canna ‘Wisley Dwarf’

We don’t grow very many Cannas but this one got our attention. Smaller than most it rises to just 3′ tall. In all of summer it produces masses of curly hot orange open flowers. Very pretty and very vivid. The moderately sized leaves are bold but not the tour de force of most. No mind its pretty and easy to grow in RICH, well drained soil with ample summer moisture in a hot, protected position. Emerges late in spring (sometimes not until early May) be patient- Cannas adore heat and it takes a few warm days to warm the soil enough to wake them up. Spreads to form expanding clumps. Full hot sun.

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Cardamine trifolia

Don’t let this cute little demure ground cover fool you. This is one tough little plant. An evergreen mounding perennial that throws up 6″ clouds of white flowers in very early spring. So fresh and welcome along side other early bloomers for part shade to shade. Very slow growing to 1′ wide for rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. However, if you skip watering this little gem no harm will come. Incredibly drought adapted. I mean withering drought. And it may wilt a little but it seems to recover from just about anything. Deep green leaves.  SE Europe.

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Carex comans ‘Olive Oil’

We found this unique foliage color in a seed batch of regular old green Carex comans. Such a cool khaki/olive color that we named it ‘Olive Oil’ and have been producing it ever since. To 1′ tall by up to 3′ wide in rich, moist soil in full sun to part shade. In summer much longer trailing stems hide little brown blooms that morph into very fecund seeds. Excellent combined with chartreuse/gold leaved plants. Great in containers. Not drought tolerant. Evergreen.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Carex conica ‘Snowline’

Aka ‘Hime kan suge’ Small clumping evergreen sedge that forms adorable fountains of fine green leaves lined in white. To 6″ x 6″ slowly increasing in rich, well drained moisture retentive conditions. Regular summer water. Wonderful massed in a local way or lining a path in a shady woodland. Good year round appearance. Not the fastest sedge so be patient and give it the conditions it wants. Full sun- with regular water to quite a bit of shade. 4″ spikes of tan flowers are cute in spring. Moderate deer resistance.

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Carex oshimensis ‘Evergold’

Common variegated sedge that is useful. The arching thin leaves have an interior of rich yellow with green lines on the sides. Dense forming evergreen tuft to 1′ tall by up to 2′ wide. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular water in full sun to part shade. Tidy discolored leaves individually in spring- do not cut to the ground. It hates this. Gold stems support tan flowers in summer. Unfortunately, this sedge is often thrown into new landscapes and is marketed as a low maintenance carefree drought tolerant thing. Its not. It likes good care to look its best. Moderate deer resistance. Evergreen.

 

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California meadow sedge is native to stream banks, and vernally wet places at the beach from British Columbia south in to Baja. A deep green winter growing sedge which each plant reaches about 18″ across and 10″ or so inches high. It flops over gracefully and has a very uniform appearance through the year with light irrigation. This is a winter growing plant that resumes growing and greens up with winter rains. In very cold weather (below 20ºF) it can take on russet tints. A FANTASTIC LAWN SUBSTITUTE where it has been used extensively for that application in California. We should use it here too. Plant on 1′ centers for a lawn (faux lawn) cover from one gallons and water regularly through the first season. No water plantings can go summer dormant but in wetter environs this can be avoided and it will remain green and verdant. Water once a week in summer to remain green.  Fantastic ground cover, slope cover as it will out compete weeds and form a uniform cover. Tolerates clay soils well, but some amending will reap rewards with a faster growing plant. Tolerates mowing very well. Oregon native plant. 

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Carex praegracilis

Meadow Sedge native to the west coast and beyond. An evergreen fine textured clumping sedge that is gracefully employed in mass plantings, lawn substitutes even freeway margins. Very adaptable plant for average soil with regular water for best appearance. It will make due with conditions that are much less optimal. To 14″ tall but bending immediately in a cascading motion that mimics movement by wind – even when its still. Forest margins, riparian sites. Very useful plant with good winter presence. Full sun to very light shade.

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Carex siderostricha ‘Variegata’

Several things about this sedge set it apart in this genus. Broad, wide leaves are soft green on the interior but lined boldly in cream. And its completely winter deciduous. Forms a spreading clump of great bolder texture that arches all in the same direction. Very nice. To 10″ tall and several feet across eventually. Rich, moisture retentive soil in part shade with consistent summer moisture. Excellent combined with the large leaves of Hosta. Line paths or use as a graceful punctuation in a woodland. Avoid really hot sunny dry locations- it will live but it won’t look so great. Completely deciduous in winter. Turns a tawny yellow in fall before leaves disappear.

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Carex tenuiculmis

We playfully refer to this large sedge as rootbeer grass. Its that color of ochre brown and it shine on this plant all year. One of the hardiest and longest lived New Zealand sedges for full sun, well drained soil and light consistent summer water. To 14″ tall but spreading up to 3′ across. Trailing stems hold little brown flowers in summer. Very good winter appearance and it has survived temperatures below 10ºF with good drainage and full sun. Elegant trailing down a hillside. Very good in large containers including winter containers. Easy to grow. Moderate deer resistance. Give it room to spread.

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Carex testacea

Wonderful orange Carex that is a great (if temporary] garden plant. Clumping and upright then broadly arching. Leaves take on intense copper tints for most of the year. Excellent plant for containers, winter containers. Evergreen and for full sun to light shade. Regular to rich, well drained soil- average summer water. Not drought tolerant over the long haul, so at least a soak once a week in summer. To 10″ tall x 20″ wide. Give it room to reach its full dimension. Containerized plants will drape gracefully over the edge. Do not cut back hard in spring- limit your tidying to removing dead/ratty leaves. If you do have to cut it back hard then make sure you apply some all organic fertilizer and water consistently to speed recovery. Average lifespan 3-5 years. Avoid full exposure to subfreezing wind. New Zealand.

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Caryopteris incana ‘Dark Blue’

We grow this species from seed because it produces such an opulent display of intense blue flowers late in the season. Whorls of flowers are absolutely irresistible to pollinators when it blooms from late July to September. A mostly herbaceous species that dies to the ground. Much more dense and compact plants than other Caryopteris which we find kind of sparse and weedy. To 2′ tall and as wide. Full sun, rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Takes drier conditions in rich soil. Mulch in fall. Cut back dead tops in spring when you see new growth begin. Aromatic. Bee’s, you plant it for the big ol black wooly bumble bees.

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Catananche caerulea

Cupid’s Dart is a simple to grow and wonderful perennial that blooms non-stop all summer long. The papery blue flowers with a deeper blue center attract all kinds of pollinators and are a specialty of Butterflies. Clump forming plant with tall wand like stems that support the flat flowers. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Full sun and a host of soils that are sharply drained. Regular summer water though it makes due with dry conditions when established. Highly deer resistant.

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Centaurea simplicicaulis

This is a really good perennial that combines pretty evergreen foliage and wiry stems that rise to 8″ and open pale pink fluffy Bachelors Button flowers in late spring and early summer. The low mounding foliage is dense and remains good looking through most seasons. It requires full sun and rich, fast draining soils to establish and spread. Line paths, rock gardens, gravel gardens, hellstrips. Light consistent summer water- not at all shade tolerant. Spreads to 2′ wide in time. Perennial containers. Native to Turkey.

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Cephalaria gigantea

Big ass huge tall Scabiosa that is difficult to find. We’re remedying that. Large plant to 6′ tall with long wand-like stems support large (2″ wide ) pale yellow Scabiosa flowers. Full sun and rich well drained soil with regular water. Tough perennial for the back of a border or the back in general. Produces a constant cloud of glowing flowers that nod in the wind. Great cut flower. Blooms June to September. Soft yellow flowers match the color intensity of the gray foliage- a sophisticated match. Revels in hot and dry conditions when established. Dies down to nothing in the fall. Roars out of the ground in spring.

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Ceratostigma willmottianum ‘Palmgold’

Striking gold leaved perennial that pairs bright blue flowers for a bold effect. Blooms from late July to October on a spreading, sprawling plant. Freezes to the ground in most winters and returns from the base if in rich, well drained soil in full sun. Excellent perennial in containers. To 1′ tall by 2 wide in a season. Regular summer water. Foliage does not burn in sun. Mulch in autumn. Do not cut back until you see new growth in spring. Then remove winter killed stems. Hardier to cold in rich, very well drained soil. Often overwinters in containers. Striking perennial for contrast, brilliance. AKA Chinese Plumbago.

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Ceratostigma willmottianum ‘Xera Sky’

A cool sub shrub that covers itself for months in dime sized sky blue flowers. The intensity of the color is hard to capture- it must be experienced. Forms a rounded wiry shrub with diamond shaped wavy small green leaves. To 2′ x 2′ in a season. Full sun, and rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Freezes to the ground below about 15ºF- re-sprouts form the base in spring. Great in containers. The better the drainage the hardier this extraordinary plant will be. Provide a warm position and mulch in autumn. Once it has been established through a winter it is a fairly permanent plant. Some deer resistance. Do not cut back until you see new growth in spring- then remove all damaged stems. Great in hot sunny borders. Regular summer water.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Cheilanthes sinuata

Cliff and rock dwelling elegant evergreen silver fern. Forms a tight clump and the silver gray fronds are slender and rise to about 8″ tall. It is capable of going summer or dry dormant when established. At its best in well drained rock gardens with some protection from blasting sun. In the wild the cliffs they occupy often shade them for half the day. Its a great container fern where it thrives and always looks nice. Best with consistent light moisture. Deer resistant.

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Cheilanthes tomentosa

Wooly Lipfern. yeah. This pretty and felty gray fern is widespread over North America. Clump forming gray fern that rises to about 10″ tall. Very elegant plant most often seen in very well drained somewhat dry sites. Full sun to part shade- protection from the most blasting heat. Light, consistent water in summer. Excellent in containers, troughs where it really does its best. Moderately deer resistant.

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Chionochloa rubra

Snow Tussock from alpine New Zealand is a clump forming grass of great grace and texture. The fine upright growing blades are a soft taupe color that shines in the sunlight. Most often the tips of this grass become cere and it gives it a wilder look. To 2′ x 2′ and a tightly clumping evergreen that increases very slowly. In summer stems clad in tan oat like flowers dangle in a pretty way from the plants top. Full sun to part shade in Well drained, rich soil with light consistent summer moisture. Appreciates an open exposure- avoid neighbors that are too rambunctious or close. Stunning in a mass planting. A great grass for our climate. Do not divide,  or move once established.

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Chondropetalum tectorum ‘Dwarf’

A very nice person from a climate far colder than ours gifted us this cute dwarf Restio. And I have to say it has performed wonderfully in my garden. It froze to the ground at 9ºF- but returned in spring right away. Seems to be one of the hardiest and easiest to grow that we have encountered. Really shines in containers where you can see the sheaths on the blue green segmented stems. Rises to about 20″ tall with many stems. In summer they are topped by clustered brown flower structures. Very nice. Well drained somewhat enriched soil (for a Restio thats odd). Full sun to very light shade. Grows fairly quickly given the conditions stated above. Light summer water. Protect containerized plants from temperatures below about 20ºF. Evergreen most winters including the bummer winter of 16/17.  We’ll make as much as we possibly can. South Africa.

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Circium occidentale

Western Thistle or Ghost Thistle is native to the mountainous regions of southern Oregon into California. Its frequently seen lining road cuts in recently disturbed very well drained soils. To 3′ tall and all white and cobwebby it produces deep magenta flowers on large candelabra type structures. Flowers appear in June and remain until August. Loved by pollinators as well as birds. Leave the structure to over winter and go to seed and you’ll get even more birds. Forms a rosette the first year and blooms the second. No summer water once established. Loves sharp drainage in average to slightly enriched soils. If you have clay amend the soil with pumice or plant on a steep slope. Avoid competition from other plants. Not a weed. Oregon native plant.

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Convallaria majalis ‘Fernwood’s Golden Slippers’

Usually this old a fashioned species sends chills up our spines. No mind it has one of the best floral fragrances of all time its a known thug. Enter this MUCH more restrained variety with new foliage in a remarkably soft texture with gorgeous citrus/chartreuse foliage that darkens up a bit in summer. To 8″ tall and blooming in mid spring as it emerges. Fragrant! Glowing! Gorgeous! Part shade to shade with light consistent summer water. Handles clay soils with no problems. Very deer resistant.

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Cosmos atrosanguineus

Chocolate Cosmos is one of our favorite seasonal plants. It blooms non-stop from June to frost with copious single deep red/black/mahogany flowers that have the special fragrance of dark chocolate. Forms colonies in well drained, rich soil with regular summer water. Cold hardy to the upper teens it will overwinter most years in very well drained soil- try a hot south facing slope. Otherwise, it forms a tuberous root and may be lifted and stored like a Dahlia in autumn. A great tender perennial for containers, borders. Fantastic cut flower. Mexico.

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Cotula ‘Tiffendel Gold’

Low evergreen South African ground cover with 3″ high ferny medium green foliage that densely covers the ground. Beginning in May and repeating heavily through summer wiry stems to 6″ tall are topped by petal free gold rayless disks. Little bobbles. These flowers age to a darker color giving a sea of these curious blossoms extra color depth. Cute little cutlfower that lasts. Vigorous grower that covers ground quickly in rich, well drained soil with consistent summer moisture. Avoid compacted dry soils- it will die out. Excellent weed supresssing ground cover. Good looking year round. Cold hardy to 0ºF. One 4″ pot can cover 2′ x 2′ in a season and beyond. Moderate deer resistance. Not really a whole lot here they can even get to.

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Cotula hispida

Groovy container or rock garden perennial that is basically a silver bun of softness. Even water beads up on the hairy metallic fine leaves. 4″ stems rise to bear petal-less golden yellow disks. whimsical and wonderful and blooms repeatedly all summer in full sun and exceptionally well drained soil with consistent moisture. Let it dry between watering and give this little evergreen plant good air circulation. Very light watering. Actually, this adorable plants best application may be in modern seasonal containers. Improves hardiness too. Silver buns and dancing disks, damn. To 6″ wide.

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Crithmum maritimum

What a cool name ‘Sea Samphire’ not sure what that means but I do know this is a beach plant on European shores. Sparse, angular and almost succulent blue foliage forms a ring of upright facing thin leaves. In late spring into summer large soft sulphur yellow umbels arrive. UMBELS UMBELS UMBELS are so in style right now. To 2′ x 2′. Full sun and average to rich well drained soil. Light to little summer water when established. Leave the Sea Samphire strictly alone. Evergreen perennial in the carrot family. Umbels. Its all about umbels. Moderate deer resistance.

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Crocosmia x crocosmiflora ‘Solfaterre’

The market is full of Crocosmia selections but we think this one is a classic. The foliage is a dramatic bronze color and the spikey leaves are a great backdrop to the apricot yellow flowers that occur in July to September. To 2.5′ tall and forming an expanding clump. Full sun to part shade in rich, moisture retentive soil with light but consistent summer water. It makes a very good cut flower that lasts in a vase. Combine with other sun loving late summer blooming perennials. Completely deciduous in winter. Moderate deer resistance.

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Cuphea cyanea var. subhirtella

This plant has been a real surprise. Most Cupheas are decidedly tender to cold in our climate, however, this variety soars above the rest. Its been a long term reliable perennial for us. Perhaps just a smidge hardier than the species. This charming little bat flower delights with multicolor flowers- tubular and shades of pink and yellow. The petals that serve as the bats ears are maroon. Wonderful long blooming plant- flowers continuously all summer to autumn. To 1′ tall and as wide. As a perennial it excels in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water in full sun. Just when you think it won’t return in spring it quickly arrives with warm weather and commences blooming almost straight away. Loved by hummingbirds, butterflies and pollinators in general. Treat it well – water and establish and mulch for the first winter. As an annual it is wonderful as a continuous flowering container subject. Native to Mexico.

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Cuphea cyanea ‘Strybing Sunset’

We originally grew this wonderful vivid free blooming bat flower as an annual. But after years of growing it in the ground we’ve found that its remarkably root hardy. To 20″ tall forming a semi-woody shrublet it produces sprays of small but vivid flowers from May to frost. Full sun and rich, WELL DRAINED soil in the ground and patience- it takes a while to come back in spring- usually not until truly hot days appear in  May. Once up- with regular supplemental water it zooms and blooms and resumes its previous stature quickly. Good drainage in a hot position seems to be the key as a perennial. Mine has happily lived in the ground in my garden in North Portland for 7 years- returning from the coldest winters. It will freeze to the ground below about 28ºF- but it always returns. Great seasonal plant in containers and it will draw hummingbirds from 5 counties around. Nice plant. Blooms continuously without intervention. My kind of plant.

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Cyclamen coum

Winter Cyclamen is a fantastic adaptable bulb that will form impressive colonies in time. The fabulous leaves are marked with silver and deep green designs. This form is known as the ‘Christmas Tree’ for its shape on the rounded leaves. From January to March small nodding purple/pink flowers form groups in concert with the foliage. A tonic for winter. To just 4″ tall in bloom and each corm gets bigger and bigger as years pass. Ants spread the seeds far and wide and new plants appear quite a distance a way. If you begin with a fancy leaved variety chances are most of your seedlings will mimic the parent. Part shade to shade in rich, well drained soil. Goes dormant and can tolerate completely dry conditions in summer. Excellent companion for winter Crocus, Hellebores, Snow drops.

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Cyclamen hederifolium ‘Xera’s Silver’

Our seed strain of the fall blooming ivy leaved Cyclamen. After 15 years we’ve separated the best all silver leaf forms. Most have white or light pink flowers that appear from late summer through mid-autumn. In time the corms become enormous and they will seed with a large majority revealing silver or heavily silver marked leaves. Great plant for competition with dry tree roots or anywhere that is dust dry in summer. Leaves appear after blossoms and are showy all winter before going spring/summer dormant. Deer resistant. Excellently adapted to our climate. Mediterranean.

Xera Plants Introduction. 

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Cynara baetica var. morrocana

Fancy and beyond showy ornamental thistle/cardoon. Finely divided silver foliage lines a stem that elongates to bear multiple large violet blue flowers. The calyx (the mechanism that holds the flower (s)) is nothing more than fiercely and lethally armed with razor sharp spikes. They will cut you . Be careful. The violet blue and lower down, pink flowers are host to every pollinator in the neighborhood, Monarch Butterflies, Hummingbirds and even the post person is drawn to this remarkable flower.  To 28″ tall for full sun and rich, well drained soil. Drainage must be sharp. Light summer water. Appreciates a hot position. Moderate deer resistance. Winter deciduous. N. Africa.

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Cynara cardunculus

Cardoon. Big ol artichoke cousin that has amazing architectural bold, silver leaves that are up to 30″ long and half as wide. Forms a large rosette (4′ across) initially then the stem extends rising to 4′ tall bearing huge rich, violet blue flowers that are up to 5″ across held in a cylindrical calyx. Open call to all pollinators. Blooms begin in the second year in May and repeat to August. Full sun, rich, well drained soil with light summer water. Give it room to spread out horizontally because it inevitably will. Light deer resistance.  Beautiful perennial in all of its parts. Lifespan (3-5 years )  on average.

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Cypella coelestis

Wonderful Iris relative from South America that we cherish for its daily large three petalled intricately marked blue flowers. Rising to 2′ tall, corrugated blue green leaves accompany the strong upright stem. Beginning in May a daily procession of flowers that open at sunrise and close and finish by 2 to 3 in the afternoon. Don’t remove the spent flower as curiously more (and more) flowers will appear from the same stem. Large seed pods will form. These may be snipped off to refocus on more blooming. Full sun and rich, well drained soil in a warm position with regular summer water. I add a handful of all organic fertilizer around the base just before blooming. This markedly increases vigor and even the size of the flowers. Freezes back almost to the ground below 20ºF. Moderate deer resistance.

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Cypella herbertii

Adorable little bulb that forms grassy colonies. Beginning in early summer and continuing to fall 10″ stems support amber orange intricate three petalled flowers. Each lasts just one day but new flowers appear seemingly from nowhere from the stems so do not remove. Grassy medium green corrugated leaves accompany the flowers. Open sites with little competition from other plants. Sharp drainage in average to rich soil with regular summer irrigation. Full sun to light shade. Surprisingly cold hardy. Rock gardens, containers.

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Cyrtomium falcatum

Japanese Holly fern we love as a great fairly large evergreen. Large glossy fronds extend to 2′ long in a substantial rosette. Part shade to shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Very heat tolerant- but requires shade. Excellent container fern- great winter appearance. High deer resistance. Mass under shrubs, in woodlands for a great texture and year round good form.

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Dahlia ‘Bednall’s Beauty’

We grow just a select few Dahlias now but over the decades we’ve been able to observe hardiness by cultivar. This is consistently one of the hardiest. And its a wonderful perennial. Finely divided foliage is dark, nearly black on a compact plant to 2′ x 2′ with stunning black/velvet red single flowers. These appear consistently from June to frost. Shorter stems lead to a smaller cut flower but it is still wonderful none-the-less. The intense deep flower color is a perfect match for the foliage yielding a dark tinted plant. Provide contrasting light to golden colored foliage for extra depth. Excellent border perennial for full sun and rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. This hardy perennial requires very little protection other than a layer of mulch in autumn. Even a layer of leaves will provide a modicum of cover. Emerges with truly warm weather in spring. Protect emerging plants from snails/slugs. Full grown plants seem less affected. Loved by pollinators and moderately deer resistant. Far from 100% but still one of the last they will munch.

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Dahlia ‘Forncett’s Furnace’

We choose the Dahlia varieties that we grow very carefully. Time has taught us that all Dahlia cultivars do not share the same cold hardiness. What we’ve whittled down is a list of Dahlias that have never frozen away for us. This marvelous selection boasts large single firey orange flowers on tall waving stems. The intensity of the flower color is shocking and it make a great denouement to summer blooming well into autumn. To 5′ tall in the ground this robust perennial requires some protection as it first emerges to deter slugs/snails. Once its up and growing fast this is less of an issue. Full sun and rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Excellent and lurid cut flower. Excellent hardiness to cold- it is not necessary to dig and store the tuber so long as the soil is well drained. Mulch in autumn post first frost adds insurance. Moderately deer resistant.

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Dasylirion wheeleri

Sotol or Desert spoon is an excellent Yucca relative that does amazingly well in our climate given the correct conditions. Native to the northern Chihuahuan Desert of northern Mexico into Arizona and stretching to the east through New Mexico into Texas is where you will find this handsome desert dweller. Rosettes of serrated blue green leaves radiate out in a circular orb. The ends of each leaf become frizzy and add an overall hazy texture to the plant. In time, when happy 9′ spikes erupt from the center and display columns of small white flowers. Very well drained soil in a full, hot position. Excellent on hot, south facing slopes but perfectly at home in the dry gravel garden. Foliage to 3′ x 3′ slowly. Evergreen. Light summer water to establish then none in subsequent years. Great in containers. High deer resistance.

 

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Datura wrightii ‘High Altitude Form’

LOCO WEED. We discovered this native SW perennial growing very high up east of the cost of the Sierra at above 6500′. Damn it gets chilly up there. Herbaceous perennial that emerges with large, bold, silver-blue leaves. Sprawling to several feet wide in a full, hot position with exceptional drainage. All summer huge white goblet like flowers unfurl from curiously colored gray buds. You can literally watch the flowers open in the evening. They glow in the moon light and emit a soft fragrance. By 2:00 the following day the flower has withered. <sad face> but more are in the wings. Begins blooming in late June and repeats to frost. Completely deciduous (gone) in winter. Good drainage in a hot position- where the soil warms early. Spectacular. Toxic- but what garden plants are not? High deer resistance.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Delosperma basauticum ‘Sunfire’

Nice compact little ice plant that requires excellent drainage, full sun and regular summer irrigation. In May/June it is covered in bright yellow star shaped flowers. They open in full sun and close when its cloudy or at night. To 3″ tall and 1′ wide in a season. Best in rock garden conditions. Works well in fast draining troughs. Tiny, congested succulent foliage.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Delphinium nudicaule

Brilliant orange/red tubular flowers each with  two spurs on the rear of the flower. They appear to be swarming around the green wiry stems that support them. To 20″ tall, blooms rising from a basal rosette of leaves. Blooms May-July in Portland. Somewhat tricky southern Oregon native wildflowers that needs a bit of care and correct siting to establish and become perennial. Rich, well drained soil with light but consistent summer moisture. Native to very steep slopes and cliffs with excellent drainage but with groundwater in the form of seeps near by. Wild areas, gravel gardens for the ultimate wildflower effect. Established plants will often re-bloom if spent flower spikes are removed. Hummingbirds. Moderate deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Deschampsia caespitosa

Fairy Grass is an Oregon native that forms bright green fine clumps but is in its glory in bloom when tall vertical stems display hazy tan flowers at the tips. Easy to grow grass that improves under cultivation. Native to semi-shady to sunny aspects in rich soil that drains but also retains moisture. Adaptable to wet sites that dry in summer. To 10″ x 1′ as a clump of foliage but rises to 3′ tall in bloom. Very wild looking grass that can be massed for a hazy meadow effect, or placed in straight lines a modern aesthetic that combines a wild plant with spaced symmetry. Excellent among shrubs and with other wild looking meadow perennials. Winter deciduous. Cut back dead growth in spring. Relatively long lived. Oregon native plant.

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Dianthus ‘Dainty Dame’

We love this selection of Dianthus that includes masses of white flowers with a bold maroon eye and tight handsome foliage. The incredibly fragrant flowers appear from April to frost- repeating quickly if spent flowers are removed. Good blue foliage is handsome at all times forming a dense dome.  To 8″ tall for full sun and rich, well drained soil with light but consistent summer water. Great color echos can be achieved when planted in concert with purple foliaged plants. Cute, fragrant cut flower. One of the best re-blooming pinks.

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Dianthus caryophyllus ‘Chomley Ferran’

She’s a strange one this Chomley. Found in a garden in Ireland this amazing carnation is astounding in the color of the flowers. Completely GRAY fully double flowers are streaked throughout with hot pink. I remember several raves in this color realm. Amazing cut flower and easy to grow border perennial. The long stems support the flowers in a vase nicely, but not necessarily when in the ground. Expect some flop. Full sun and average to rich, well drained soil with low/regular summer water. Blooms May-July. To 18″ tall and a little wider. Gray blue foliage is evergreen in our climate. Wowza, Carnations on acid.

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Dianthus petraeus ssp. noeanus

Adorbs rock garden Dianthus with fine deep green foliage forming rounded mounds. In late spring to summer 8″ stem support feathery intensely fragrant white flowers. They come in a mass and are fragrant of cloves many feet away. It makes a great cut flower for small arrangements. To 8″ across for full sun and sharp drainage and light consistent summer water. Rock gardens, troughs, slopes. Easy to grow rock garden variety.

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Dianthus x ‘Eileen Lever’

Eileen is a little bun of fun. A tight mounding Dianthus that forms a dome of prickly blue/green foliage 8″ wide and just 2″ tall. In May-June this foliage is obscured by a solid mass of brilliant pink flowers. They emit the treasured clove fragrance so loved in this genus. A first rate rock garden perennial, or for troughs or even amenable with drainage to the front of borders, dry gardens and even Hellstrips. Gritty soil is what most dianthus buns crave, and you can achieve this by simply amending the soil with a handful of sharp gravel. Otherwise this cuties is adapted to not many nutrients but must have full sun. Light consistent summer irrigation makes the slowly expanding bun speed up. Just a touch. Not difficult and stunning in bloom. Buns, we love the buns of fun. Thanks Eileen. Evergreen. Cut off spent flowers for a clean and neater appearance. Very good to try where bunnies and deer are an issue. They tend to completely overlook this plant. Long lived perennial.

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Dianthus x plumarius ‘Charles Musgrave’

Green flowers are at a premium in the garden and green flowers with tremendous fragrance on long stems for cutting- well we have this somewhat rare Dianthus to fit that regime. Blue/green grassy foliage is dense on a spreading clumping evergreen perennial. In May/June 8″ stems support single 1″ wide heavily pinked (jagged petal edges) that are white with a wonderful green zone in the center. Heavily scented of cloves- amazeballs. Full sun and well drained soil with light summer water. Average to rich soil. Excellent border perennial, rock garden subject, cutting garden flower. Excels on slopes. Long lived.

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Diascia ‘Blue Bonnet’

We’ve found this remarkable perennial to be perfectly hardy in our climate and it offers several outstanding features. Columns of overlapping cupped pink flowers are profuse and as they age they take on ghostly blue tints. The effect is greater in hot weather and gives this spreading perennial bicolor pink/pale blue flowers for months. To 18″ tall and steadily spreading to more than one foot wide in time. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water is ideal, but we’ve noted its stellar performance in un-amended clay as well.  Blooms continuously for months beginning in May and if the flowers become tired it may be sheared, watered well, and perhaps given a little all purpose fertilizer to start the show again. Winter deciduous. Excels in containers. Excellent on slopes, the front of borders, rock gardens, hell strips. Ethereal flowers combine deliciously with variegated moor grass (Molinia caerulea ‘Variegata’) and deep purple Penstemon ‘Enor’ for similar cultural requirements and a season long display.

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Dicentra cuccularia

Dutch Man’s Breetches. One of the first wildflowers that I learned mostly because of the funny common name. Native to selected spots in Oregon- in the Columbia River Gorge as well as along parts of the Clackamas River.  Adorable little thing closely related to bleeding hearts. Ferny blue foliage emerges in early spring and is followed by a precious display of two spurred upside down white flowers. Each patch holds many. By the time hot weather has arrived this true spring ephemeral has disappeared completely- a good rest during the summer drought. Part shade to high overhead shade in a protected location in rich, moisture retentive soil. Occasional summer water is good- even though it is dormant. Mix with other spring delights like Erythronium (Dog tooth violets) and mid spring small bulbs like Scilla or Chionodoxa. Moderate deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Dicentra formosa ‘Langtrees’

Excellent form of our native bleeding heart that is an incredibly long blooming perennial for gardens. Remarkable blue foliage is beautiful if it never produced 1′ spikes of clear white pendant flowers. Blooms begin in spring and with regular summer water in rich soil continue throughout summer. Shade to full sun (with regular water). Forms widely spreading colonies. Give it room to spread. This tough, adaptable plant handles any soil situation from perpetually moist to quite dry. Resistant to pests- that includes slugs and snails as well as deer. (They will briefly browse it before ditching it for better things- it recovers quickly). Completely winter deciduous. Oregon native plant.

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Dicliptera suberecta

This is the old name for what has become known as Hummingbird Flower. Rounded, pretty soft furry gray/blue foliage supports 2′ stems clad in brilliant tubular orange flowers. They appear non-stop for months. Excellent in seasonal containers or in the ground a spreading perennial for RICH, WELL DRAINED soil in a hot position in full sun. Great occupant of parking strips. To 2′ wide in time. Disappears completely in winter and returns late in spring ( May- be patient ). It likes water and rich soil, the good stuff. Mulch with leaves in fall. Uruguay/Argentina.

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Dierama ‘Xera’s Darkest Shades’

We’ve been saving seed from our darkest flowered babies. Its taken us years but we think we’ve got a good mix. Deep purple to dark magenta bells on moderately sized plants. EVERGREEN leaves are gray green and erect. Full sun and rich, well drained soil with ample water in summer. Blooms May-July. To 3′-4′ and then taller in bloom. Little competition from other plants- kind of a diva that way. AKA Angel’s Fishing Rod or Wandflower. Dierama is native to open high plains in South Africa as well as in mountains. Never cut back a Dierama to the ground. It will shock it horribly and may not recover. Instead cut out old or winter damaged leaves and leave the fresh foliage. Highly deer resistant. Regular summer water through bloom then light. Spectacular perennial.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Dierama pulcherrimum ‘Magenta Giant’

A fantastic Angel’s Fishing Rod that includes great cold hardiness and enormous 8′ wands that support hot magenta tubular flowers in early summer. Gray/blue foliage is evergreen and in this form is seldom disfigured by winter cold. Clump forming with leaves to 3′ tall and spreading slowly in rich, deep soil with regular summer water. Full, all day sun with little competition from other plants. The incredibly graceful wands arch over and dip and sway with the slightest breeze. We do this variety by division so it is not in great supply but if you’ve had Dieramas fail from cold or another reason this is the one you should grow. Do not cut back the foliage in autumn, rather cut out old and damaged leaves individually to tidy. Resents disturbance once established. By far the easiest and hardiest Angel’s Fishing Rod that we’ve grown. This is done by division so availability is limited.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Digitalis ferruginea ‘Gigantea’

5′ spires of condensed tubular rusty orange/brown densely line the stems of this perennial foxglove in late spring into summer. From a basal rosette of corrugated mid green foliage they rise and delight pollinators and floral arrangers alike. Really cool mixed with wispy ornamental grasses. Full sun and average to rich soil with light, regular summer water. Long lived for a foxglove. I once had one persist in my garden for 15 years! Very dry adapted when established. Basal clumps increase annually and therefore so do the numbers of spikes. Supremely deer resistant as all Digitalis (we’ve expanded our offering of this genus for that very reason). Semi-evergreen. May reseed in open disturbed soils. Seedlings are easy to dispatch, move, or share with friends.

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Digitalis lanata

Wooly foxglove is a vigorous and indispensable perennial for areas ravaged by deer. Native to the mountains of Greece it sends up remarkable 3′ spires with fascinating intricate flowers. Each spikes is tightly packed with small tubular flowers that have a brown/amber netting pattern on the outside. In the front of the flower a prominent white lip protrudes. The symmetrical effect of all these flowers is grand and individually reminiscent of an orchid. Part shade to full sun in rich, well drained soil with light but consistent summer water. Forms spreading rosettes to 2′ across in a short amount of time. Semi-evergreen in winter. Supremely tolerant of deer browse- they rarely even mess with this stately easy to grow perennial. Average lifespan 5+ years. The mid green handsome leaves are finely coated in white fur.

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Digitalis obscura

One of our fave foxgloves, this (sub)shrubby species forms large spreading plants with multiple spikes of the most amazing flowers. 2′ spikes support tubular orange flowers with an interior of russet brown and more intricate markings. An excellent candidate for hot sunny slopes as it is native to the Iberian peninsula. Full sun, well drained soil and light summer moisture. Reseeds happily in open disturbed sites and those seedlings can be dispatched, moved, or shared with friends. Spectacular flowers appear in spring and continue into summer. High deer resistance. Average lifespan of an individual plant is 3-5 years. Dry borders, gravel gardens, exposed areas with voracious deer. Wonderful plant.

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Digitalis parviflora

The so called Chocolate Foxglove gets its moniker from the soft brown tubular flowers that densely line the stalks. They tower  up to 4′-5′ when happy. A perennial foxglove with amazing architectural bloom spires. That remain effective for weeks. Full sun and rich, well drained soil. Regular summer water which can often lead to re-bloom. Nice corrugated foliage lined in fine white hairs. Strong deer resistance. The textures and combinations that this offers are mind boggling.

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Digitalis x ‘Honey Trumpet’

What great luck. The bees were busy in our nursery years ago and they crossed a shrubby species of Digitalis with a tetraploid herbaceous species. What we got was a fantastic incredibly long blooming and tough perennial with exquisitely honey colored flowers. Remove spent spikes in June and more will likely appear. Sterile and very likely a tetraploid. Each clumping plant creates multiple 3′ spikes of flowers- up to 15 spikes per plant! Blooms April-June and sporadically after that. Forms semi-evergreen clumps in FULL SUN and rich to average well drained soil. Completely deer resistant. Light summer water requirements.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Disporopsis pernyi

Handsome and useful evergreen lily relative for woodland gardens. To 20″ tall and arching each stem is lined with large green leaves. In early summer the whole stem is clad in white pendant bell shaped flowers. If you greet them up close they have the surprising fragrance of jasmine. Spreads slowly to form substantial colonies. Staunchly evergreen with great winter presence. Rich, moisture retentive woodland soils suit it. Its adaptable to very dense shade and there it can take remarkably dry conditions. Mix with Danae, Polystichum, Aspidistra. Not sure about deer resistance. Please let us know.

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Disporum cantonense ‘Night Heron’

Amazing perennial that is a great release from the former Heronswood Nursery. A tall growing evergreen fairy bells that emerges in spring with new growth dyed distinctly black- stems and leaves. They eventually turn to a medium green in summer. White the new growth unfurls its bearing small green/white bell shaped flowers. The effect is sublime. To 4′ tall ( or taller) it rises up to a finely divided scape of leaves in an arching fan construction. Excellent perennial that may be cut back to the ground in late winter to showcase the dramatic new growth. Woodland conditions, rich, humusy soil with regular summer water. Great in containers. Resistant to slugs and snails. I have not tried this perennial in deer land so I’m not sure how it would fare. Please let us know if you have experience with that.

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Disporum longistylum ‘Green Giant’

Wonderful large evergreen perennial for shade with an imposing presence. Rising up to 7′ tall the divided scape of leaves and light green bell shaped flowers gives the impression of bamboo when mature. Evergreen foliage remains surprisingly good looking through the winter. New growth shoots up as thick fast growing deep green canes before the leaves and flowers unfurl in late spring. Good resistance to slug and snails. Long lived perennial for woodland conditions. Thrives in large containers. Regular summer water in rich, humusy soil. Add a yearly application of compost to increase luster and vigor. Forms slowly increasing clumps.

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Disporum sessile ‘Variegatum’

Shade plays by its own rules and to be honest flowers are often pretty modest. Therefore we rely on foliage to brighten dark corners and add texture and contrast. This elegant perennial is 18″ tall and arching stems have large opposite leaves delicately feathered in white. In spring small white bells droop gracefully along the stem. Deep, rich, hummus rich woodland soils that retain moisture. Regular summer water. Winter deciduous.

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Dracocephalum austriacum ‘Fuji Blue’

Immensely showy perennial that puts on a stellar mid summer show of soft blue relatively large flowers. Spreading to 2′ wide in full sun and rich well drained soil this mint relative sends 18″ spikes of outward facing light blue tubular flowers in June-July. Loved by pollinators and gardeners alike. Easy to grow plant that is cold hardy and long lived. Great for blazing hot hellstrips, sunny rock gardens, the front of borders. Light summer water- becomes surprisingly drought tolerant with age. Completely winter deciduous.

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Echinacea x ‘Cheyenne Spirit’

We love this seed strain of Echinacea the least of which is that they seem to establish and over winter in a superior way.  Multiple colors in these hybrids from reds to orange and yellow. large up facing flowers with a central fragrant yellow cone. Clump forming perennial for rich soil that is very well drained with consistent light irrigation in summer. Blooms naturally appear fro July to September- and occasionally longer. Remove spent flowers and more will likely appear. Great pollinator plant. Awesome cut flower. Over winters better if there is plenty of oxygen incorporated in the soil. Mulch annually with compost. Full sun to light shade. Excellent in our region on slopes.

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Echinops ritro ruthenicus

A great plant in all of its parts. Beautiful intricate large blue gray leaves with an underside of white form substantial clumps. In high summer flower spikes rise  up to 3′ bearing dense sky blue orbs of flowers- the structure of the orbs gives them a metallic glint. Amazing. Obviously where it got its common name of globe thistle. Long lived herbaceous perennial for fast draining rich soils in full, hot sun. Spreads to form substantial clumps in time. Avoid sodden soils and heavy un-amended clay. Great on slopes. Completely deciduous in winter. These flowers seem to be made for butterflies- all sorts visit the flowers frequently. Light deer resistance. Plant with other large sun loving perennials to match the vigor and scale of this plant.

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Echium russicum

Cold hardy member of a mostly tender genus. This native of the Ukrainian steppes sends up a 30″ spike of rose red flowers in mid summer. Excellent to include in meadows, with ornamental grasses in nearly any soil that is not boggy. Full sun. Loved by pollinators. Spike rises from a low basal rosette of leaves. Lifespan 3-5 years.. Reseeds reliably. Very light summer water.

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Echium wildprettii

Huge, stately, bold biennial that we kind of consider the king of all biennials. The first season it forms a huge rosette of thin silver foliage. Showy in its own right. If we have a mild winter (above 15ºF) the whole plant soars to 6′ tall the second year and is a tower of red/purple borage flowers. Pollinators lose their little collecting minds and even hummers show up. Not entirely hardy but we think its such an incredible foliage plant in its first year that is is definitely worth the risk.  Following bloom it sets seed- man does it set seed and seedling will appear all over the garden. They are easy to identify- rosettes of thin leaves with a sandpapery texture. You can move them or mass them for a cool effect. Rich to average, well drained soil with light summer water. Full sun and position out of high winds which can topple the plant in its blooming stage. Excellent performance at the Oregon Coast. Native to the Canary Islands.

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Ellisiophyllum pinnatum

Taiwan Starflower is an adorable and useful ground cover for rich, moist soil in part shade to full sun. Intricate mid-green spreading foliage is deciduous in the coldest winters. Continuously from spring to fall star shaped white flowers appear happily over the mounding plant. The flowers are reminiscent of the annual Bacopa. Spreads to form happy patches under established shrubs, in the front of borders. A simple and useful summer container plant as well. Avoid hard compacted soils and heavy clay. Mulch with compost annually to refreshen  and bring nutrients. Regular summer water.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria ) ‘Solidarity Pink’

If shocking vermillion, red, and orange are a bit too vibrant for you enter this softly hued selection. Soft pink tubular flowers appear constantly from early August to October. Low spreading perennial to 8″ tall by 2′ wide in a short time. The very light green foliage is clad in soft hairs giving the whole plant a soft mien. Full sun and rich to average well drained soil is ideal. Slopes, rock gardens, walls, hellstrips all are appropriate for this low water plant. Water diligently to establish but never boggy. In subsequent years only light water on occasion is required. Spreads laterally underground by stolons. Long lived perennial if sited and somewhat cared for. Completely winter deciduous- cut away the previous years dead growth in February. Somewhat deer resistant. Mix with other late blooming perennial. Wonderful combined with Cuphea hirtella and the soft yellow flowers of Erodium chrysanthemum.  West coast native plant that calls to hummingbirds far and wide. Takes blasting hot conditions in stride.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) ‘Bowman’

Possibly our second most popular California Fuchsia cultivar as it is more upright but also a free and early bloomer. To 20″ tall the fine green leaves that line the stems make the brilliant orange tubular flowers stand out. Blooms early August to October and spreading underground by stolons to form expanding colonies. To several feet wide- give it room. Ideal in full sun, well drained soil- or on a slope which will further assist in drainage. Brilliant flowers are a beacon to Hummingbirds. Completely drought adapted and requires little if any summer water. Long blooming western native perennial.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) ‘Sierra Salmon’

Cool late blooming California Fuchsia with silver foliage a great foil for the soft coral and prolific September/October flowers. Spreading to 2′ wide and 1′ tall in bloom it prefers very well drained rich soil with little summer water. Full sun including hot aspects for the best results. Winter deciduous. A great flower color for the genus and pairs sweetly with autumn Salvias, such as ‘Playa Rosa’ and ‘Flower Child’. Drought adapted and cold hardy.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) ‘Silver Select’

No other California Fuchsia has foliage that even approaches being as ashy white as this cultivar. Its as if the foliage is covered in dense white powder. The 1″ long hot orange/red flowers absolutely shine against this ghostly backdrop. Vigorous perennial for well drained sites and just light summer water. Full sun. To 20″ tall in bloom which starts in early August and continues into October. Hummingbirds dive down for this vivid sweet treat. Expanding to a clump 2′ wide in just a few years. Dies completely away in winter…only the stoloniferous roots remain to regenerate this sexy perennial in spring. Moderate deer resistance.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) latifolia ‘Calistoga’

California Fuchsias are known for their striking hot orange flowers. This variety takes it even  further with profuse flowers that range to vermillion red. To 1′ tall and 3′ wide in rich, well drained soil with little summer moisture. Full sun. This spreading gray leaved perennial begins blooming in August and extends to October. Excellent perennial for dry hillsides, large rock gardens. Combines well with Arctostaphylos and other low water plants. Loved by hummingbirds. Completely deciduous in winter. Give it room to spread.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria) septentrionalis ‘Select Mattole’

Our most popular hummingbird fuchsia because of its low habit, dense silvery foliage and early and extended bloom period. To just 6″ tall and spreading to form a patch 2′ wide quickly. Well drained rich soil with little summer irrigation once established. Hot vermillion orange tubular flowers are born continuously and en masse from July to October. Completely drought adapted when established. Great on slopes. Light summer water to establish. Winter deciduous. Loved by Hummingbirds. This species is native to the northern California and SW Oregon redwood region.

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Epimedium grandiflorum ‘Lilafee’

Petite deciduous barrenwort that forms compact patches of low green foliage. It emerges tinted in amber and turns to green as the multiple wiry stems support clouds of opalescent lavender flowers. The spurs that radiate out are tipped in white- delicious. Part shade to shade in woodland conditions. Rich, hummusy soil and regular summer water. Blooms appear from late March to early May. Fall color is tawny orange. Completely winter deciduous.

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Epimedium grandiflorum var. higoense ‘Bandit’

We love this little multidimensional barrenwort that pairs fresh green leaves outlined in black in spring while simultaneously producing clouds of star shaped crystal white flowers. A compact smaller growing plant to 10′ tall and with good care spreading to 18″ wide. The remarkable new growth morphs to solid fresh green in summer. Blooms March to May in part to full shade (really doesn’t like sun so don’t fudge it). Regular summer water. Rich, moisture retentive hummus rich soil. Add an annual application of compost and even a  handful of organic fertilizer in spring to increase vigor- give it a good life. Completely winter deciduous. Long lived perennial.

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Epimedium pinnatum ssp. Colchicum

We love this wide spreading and tough barrenwort. Prior to the new foliage emerging in early spring 18″ spikes arise clad in wonderful sulfur yellow almost transparent flowers. The individual flowers are large for this genus. The new growth that follows emerges amber and red before making its way to its green summer hue. Runs underground to form large stands, give it room – or at least expect this. Mostly evergreen- to be honest that foliage looks pretty beat up by spring so we advice removing it in February prior to spring growth. Part shade ( to a surprising amount of sun – if you water and are brave) in rich, deep, moisture retentive soil. Once of the most drought adapted of the genus making due with light summer water- which spurs it to spread. Ground cover under dense tree shade, dry hillsides, woodland gardens. High deer resistance. Long lived.

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Epimedium wushanense ‘Spiny Leaved Form’

Beautiful barrenwort selection of an already beautiful species. Large spiny leaves with a glossy sheen begin in shades of vivid salmon red with darker mottling on new growth changing slowly to medium green by mid summer. A really good evergreen perennial that always looks its best. Evergreen leaves over winter fairly well, and if they get beaten up simply chop the leaves to the ground in February. In March, accompanying the stellar new growth tall spikes of many congest off white and pale yellow flowers seem to pour out between the new leaves.  All in all its a great color coordinated perennial, dynamic and always changing. Clumps expand markedly in rich, moisture retentive woodland soil. Avoid blasting bright sun. To 2′ x 2′ shortly. Moderate deer resistance. Adapts quickly to dry shade conditions.

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Epimedium x ‘Aurora’ (Xera)

One of our selections of a hybrid barrenwort with stunning sunset colored flowers for a long period in spring and often into early summer.  Pendant star shaped flowers are orange and red with white tipped spurs. Easy to grow evergreen clumping perennial for part shade to shade. Rich, moisture retentive soil with consistent summer water. Mulch annually with compost to drive vigor, health. New foliage emerges amber with darker red flecks throughout before settling in to medium green in summer. To 14″ x 14″.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Epimedium x ‘Domino’

Can’t help but love the excellent performance of this exceptional barrenwort. From pretty scimitar shaped green leaves rise wiry stems supporting clouds of star shaped flowers. The center of each flower is plum colored and the extending spurs are crystal white for a great bicolor effect. Extraordinarily long blooming from March well into summer- and sometimes longer if it feels like the weather has been perfect. Semi-evergreen to evergreen but we heavily advocate cutting the whole thing to the ground in February to make way for a fresh new year. New foliage is heavily mottled in red before settling to mid green. Part shade (open north exposure like the cool north side of your house is fantastic too) to shade in rich, well drained soil with consistent summer moisture. Spreads to several feet wide in several years. A truly great, long lived Epimedium that is very pretty all around. Moderate deer resistance.

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Epimedium x ‘Golden Treasure’

One of our very best Epimedium introductions. Incredibly floriferous hybrid with golden yellow almost shiny flowers with a bright red cap on top. They appear in clouds above the foliage from March to June. New foliage is amber colored before settling in maturity to soft green. Evergreen but we think it looks much better if you remove the tattered foliage from the previous season in February- cut it to the ground to make way for a fresh new season. Blooms very heavily and they are vivid enough to spot from a distance. Vigorous clumping perennial for part shade to shade in rich, well drained hummusy soil. Regular summer water will spur repeat bloom  but once established it easily endures summer drought. Avoid hot sun. to 20″ tall in bloom making a clump about as wide. Moderate deer resistance.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Epimedium x ‘Hinode’

Our own selection of a barrenwort with amazing sunset colored flowers. In fact ‘Hinode’ is Japanese for sunrise. The orange/red/pink/yellow adorable nodding flowers are born above the foliage on slender wiry stems. Blooms March-May. New foliage is mottled in amber and madder red before settling to medium green. Evergreen selection. Remove the winter tattered leaves in February prior to new growth. Clump forming to 1′ wide after 5 years. Full shade to part shade, not fussy about soil- avoid compacted dry clay soils. Regular summer water increases growth and maintains the plants luster. Woodland wonder.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Epimedium x ‘Kym’s Gold’

This was found in the garden of our wonderful garden writer friend Kym Pokorny. Its a superior selection with profuse star shaped gold flowers with an amber collar around the lower petals. New growth is dramatic madder red  with darker splotches before settling to a soft medium green. The new foliage color in combination with the flowers yields a very sophisticated plant. Clump forming evergreen perennial for part shade to shade. Rich, well composted soil with regular summer irrigation sends this cultivar into a wonderful place. To 18″ across and 1′ tall in bloom. Remove winter tattered leaves in February to feature the new foliage/flowers. Epimedium are resistant to slugs and not often bothered by deer.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Epimedium x ‘Peter Rabbit’

Special barrenwort selection with some of the largest flowers in the genus that we grow. Arching flowers are pastel white and yellow and appear most profusely around easter time. Long long blooming from April into July. Tightly clumping perennial for RICH, well drained soil with regular moisture in part shade to full shade. New growth is mottled in red before settling to medium green handsome leaves. Plant with Omphalodes, Primula sieboldii cvs. and Vancouveria chrysantha.  To 10″ tall and clumping.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Epimedium x ‘Pirouette’

Fanciful flowering barrenwort that we love for its large pale yellow flowers with spurs that point all in the same direction as if they were spinning. The flowers appear on long wiry stems above the foliage in March-May. Bold leaves emerge amber before settling to a nice mid green. Elegant perennial for deep rich soil in part shade to shade. To 18″ tall and twice as wide in great time. Often re-blooms into summer if conditions are favorable Evergreen. Cut back winter tattered foiiage in February for springs oncoming show.  Deer resistant.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Epimedium x ‘Raspberry Cascade’

Searching the universe for a truly red flowered barrenwort- this seedling came along and it has more than just that. Large, profuse nodding flowers are true raspberry red with white tipped spurs. Blooms appear continuously from April to July and sporadically after that. Additionally the new foliage is amber with soft red splotches settling to a soft glossy mid green. Tightly clumping perennial for rich, well composted soil that retains moisture in part shade to full shade. Tolerates dry conditions  when established. Evergreen, remove winter tattered leaves in February to make way for the new spring show. One of our best introductions. Long lived, easy to grow perennial for shade.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Epimedium x ‘Supernova’

Something about the clean lines of the hot yellow flowers topped with a symmetrical bright red cap recalls a miniature explosion in space. Wiry stems to 14″ support clouds of this starry flowers from late March for and extended period well into summer. New growth is mottled with maroon over an initial hue of amber before settling to soft glossy green. All together this is a great performer for part shade to shade in rich to average well drained soil. Regular summer water not only refreshes these tough shade plants it will spur them to increase. The rewards often are not apparent until the following spring. Cut away the evergreen foliage in late winter to reveal the new years flower as well as highlight the pretty new growth. Good deer resistance. Spreads moderately fast to form a clump 20″ wide in 5 years. Nice cut flower as well. Very easy to grow.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Epimedium x ‘Yubae’

A large growing deciduous barrenwort that bears large spectacular dark pink flowers in conspicuous clusters atop the bold foliage. New growth emerges soft amber pink before maturing to soft green. Foliage to 20″ high and up to 2 1/2′ wide and flowers taller than that. Rich, moisture retentive soil in woodland conditions. Blooms appear from March to May. Part shade to shade  with regular summer water. A unique flower color for Epimediums. Completely winter deciduous.

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Epimedium x grandiflorum ‘Pierre’s Purple’

A really good purple flowering barrenwort with new foliage that emerges deep purple and accompanies the mid-violet colored flowers that have spurs tipped in white. A really good effect on a sophisticated long lived perennial. To 1′ tall and 2′ wide in rich, moisture retentive soil. Add a layer of compost annually and water regularly through the dry summer months. Completely winter deciduous. One of the best purples that we’ve grown. Easy plat.

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Epimedium x warleyense

Very pretty thin spreading Epimedium with soft amber new growth accompanying spikes of fairly large amber orange flowers with a soft yellow center. To 20″ tall in bloom the new foliage on this mostly deciduous perennial settles in at about 1′ tall. Spreads underground and not compactly. Give it room in a woodland to roam. Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular summer water. Part shade to high overhead shade. Easy woodland perennial for spectacular early spring effects. Moderate deer resistance.

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Erigeron glaucus ‘Bountiful’

Such a long, long, blooming tough and dependable native this forgiving perennial outshines all other cultivars in the size of each flower. The many rows of glowing lavender petals that characterize this fabulous perennial outline nearly 2″ wide flowers. They begin in earnest in late May and proceed unabated until early autumn. If the flowers become tired or scorched simply cut it back and wham! You’re quickly back in business. Adaptable to many soil types and will subsist on only natural rainfall but occasional deep soaks in summer reaps rewards. To 10″ tall forming a round perennial to 18″ wide. Full sun,  to very light shade. Pollinator masterpiece. Oregon native plant. 

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Erigeron glaucus ‘Cape Sebastian’

Beach Flea Bane or more popularly Oregon Beach Daisy is a phenomenal native perennial for our climate. Low and spreading a continuous supply of periwinkle/violet daisies with a yellow center appear from late spring to autumn and occasionally in winter. To just 8″ tall it forms 2′ wide spreading clumps.  Simple spoon shaped green leaves. In its native environs which is the cliffs immediately adjacent to the beach it can cling precariously which shows it has sturdy roots. Full sun to light shade and regular irrigation or absolutely none when established. This floriferous and larger flowering selection is from the southern oregon coast. Excellent performance in hells strips..at the front of borders. This excellent semi-evergreen native perennial should be everywhere. Oregon native plant.

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Erigeron karvinskianus

Santa Barbara Daisy or Mexican Fleabane. You choose. Either way its a great long long blooming perennial that thrives in our climate with good drainage. Masses of 3/4″ wide daisy flowers that open pink and then change to pure white. All the stages of color are present at once making it much more interesting. The fine, almost hazy texture that the daisies produce lightens borders, rock gardens and even containers. To 8″ tall x 2′ wide in a season. Rich, WELL DRAINED soil with light, regular summer irrigation. The more well drained the site the hardier to cold..thats why you often see it growing in walls or rock gardens. Its a fantastic long blooming carefree container plant as well. Completely winter deciduous. It also seeds around lightly. Very pretty, airy perennial native to Mexico. Full sun.

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Erigeron x glaucus ‘Wayne Roderick’

Possibly a hybrid this is a spectacular perennial in our climate where it produces a non-stop supply of amethyst blue daisies with a yellow center from spring unabated to autumn. And occasionally in winter. A rosette forming perennial that sends up its clumps of flowers on vertical 6″ spikes. Loved by all pollinators with a special emphasis given to butterfies. Carefree, low water western native perennial with consistent excellent performance. To 18″ wide in time. Light, consistent summer water encourages re-bloom. Nice little cut flower. Rich, to average, well drained soil in full sun. Avoid rambunctious competition from other perennials. Mix with Agapanthus, Calamintha ‘Montrose White’. Even effective in containers. Oregon native plant.

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Erodium ‘Pickering Pink’

‘Pickering Pink’ Cranesbill. The name sounds like it will have an all pink flower. Not really. The simple five petalled flowers have two petals that are pink on top with a distinct black blotch. The two lower petals are soft pink almost white. This contrast of colors gives this small plant extra impact as well as a fun wild flower appeal. It forms a tight mound of soft, divided foliage to 3″ tall by 10″ wide. The cheery flowers are born on 6″ wiry stems. Blooms appear continuously from mid-spring to frost. Erodiums bloom and bloom with little intervention from the gardener. They also excel in the rough life of hellstrips. In borders, rock gardens, containers, even small meadow gardens this European native is excellently adapted to our climate. Light summer water increases the flower display and spent flowers can be snipped to not only spur more but to achieve a tidier look. Evergreen foliage and low stature also make it appropriate between pavers. Some deer resistance as well as rabbit resistance.  Very easy to grow.  Full sun.

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Erodium chrysanthum

Cranesbills come in all colors but this is one of the most garden worthy, in fact its one of the best perennials for our climate. A GREAT PLANT PICK. Tightly clumping perennial with frilly silver intricate leaves. Beginning in spring and continuously to frost a constant supply of soft yellow cupped flowers on 5″ stems. Pale yellow with silver. YUM. Full sun and rich to average WELL DRAINED soil. Light to little summer water- actually once its established I never water it and everything is just fine. Nice en mass. Rock gardens- thrives in the hellstrip. Not a fan of shade. Winter deciduous- unusual for an Erodium. Long lived.

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Erodium x ‘Fran’s Delight’

If you’ve never grown any of these selections of Crane’s Bill- Erodiums which are close Geranium relatives you really are missing out. This cultivar is a Xera favorite. Low clumps of dense frilly gray foliage are evergreen and a cool canvas for the constant supply of outward facing luminous lavender purple flowers on 8″ stems. Continuously from March to October it produces these simple flowers that have a darker purple blotch on the bottom two petals. Much wilder looking than hardy Geraniums they are invaluable because they take up virtually no space- and again their bloom season is phenomenal. Not bothered by pests of any kind- including slugs and snails. Deer mostly over look them but they will dine if their attention goes that way. Full sun to quite a bit of shade which does not diminish their blooming power. Well drained soils of average to slightly enriched fertility. Remove spent flower spikes to to tidy and encourage more flowers. Forms a clump to 1′ wide in time. Fantastic plant. Come on join us in the world of Cranesbills.

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Erodium x ‘Natasha’

A blooming marvel is this perennial. I’ve had it in bloom in every month of the year. Beginning in early spring a truly phenomenal constant show of soft lavender flowers with a deeper purple blotch on the upper two petals. Very wildflower looking and it forms a contained clump about the size of an apple pie. The flowers born on 6″ stems should be lifted away when spent to encourage more. Not that much encouragement is needed. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, well drained soil. Little summer water once established. A little water in the heat of summer will promote bloom. Evergreen low finely divided foliage is gray green and pretty with the flowers. No cutting back, easy, everblooming. Low water. What more could you want?

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Erodium x ‘Stephanie’

One of the most outstanding cultivars of the larger Cranesbills. Fine, dense, frilly aromatic grass green foliage makes a tight pie sized low clump. From spring and continuously to fall 6″ stems produce multiple pure white flowers. The upper two petals have a central blotch of inky black. Very cool effect. This is an easy to grow low maintenance perennial for full sun, well drained soil and light to little summer water. The front of borders, rock gardens even troughs. Seldom without flowers. Evergreen. A really pretty, floriferous perennial.

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Erodium x variable ‘Album’

Adorable ground cover cranesbill that greets summer with a continuous supply of dainty pure white flowers. Evergreen and completely prostrate with sage green foliage creeping densely along the ground. Rich, WELL DRAINED soil that is not compacted in full sun to part shade. Makes a tidy looking small scale ground cover. Works between pavers as long as the soil does not become too compacted. Add compost annually and that will help. Light but consistent summer water. Hardier to cold than listed in literature. Obviously they haven’t grown this little sweetheart.

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Eryngium agavafolium

Evergreen Eryngium that we love.  The glossy deep green strappy leaves are fiercely armed and form large rosettes. In summer 28″ spikes produce bright green clover like orbicular flowers on a divided scape. You won’t draw rattlesnakes but you will draw bees. Cool looking plant that is easy to grow in rich to average well drained soil Good appearance even during winter. Remove the flower scape when the blooms start to turn brown- not as pretty. Sexy plant that requires no summer water and just full sun. Long lived. I see boulders and Cacti and grasses and gravel. Sexy rosettes.

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Eryngium bourgotii

Very blue, oh so blue shorter Sea Holly that has pretty unusual leaves as well as stunning flowers. Crinkly sage green leaves are prickly and outlined in fine white. From this batch of foliage the flowering spike attains about 20″ inches before producing the metallic sky blue star shaped flowers. Very pretty and it will instantly draw pollinators. Remains in bloom for 4-6 weeks from early to mid summer. Full sun, rich, well drained soil and little summer water when established. Tough but pretty perennial that is very long lived. Increases in width each year to 2′ wide. Excellent candidate for the hellstrip, the front of the border or gravel gardens. High deer resistance. Completely deciduous in winter.

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Eryngium pandanifolium

Kind of hard to believe this is a sea holly but this enormous evergreen perennial from Argentina definitely is. Long upright soft green spikes leaves emirate from a large rosette to about 3′ tall by 3′ wide. In summer 6′ tall spikes support off white orbicular flowers on tall divided scares. Pollinator heaven. A very dry climate appearance lends it to pair with cactus, Nolinas, even Agaves. Gravel gardens large dry borders. Full sun and very little water once established. Protect from subfreezing wind if an arctic event threatens. High deer resistance. Big bold plant.

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Eryngium pandanifolium var. lesseauxii’

Fun tall growing sea holly that may be impossible to pronounce but its easy to grow. Upright growing finely serrated or prickly leaves first make a low 2′ wide rosette then when it feels like it- usually the second year a big as spike rises with a divided scape and tons of off white prickly clover like flowers dot the stem tips. Its cool. This whole perennial is cool and its slightly hardier than the species. Very cool. Evergreen perennial for full sun and just about any well drained soil. Flowers rise to 5′ tall and with time there will be many spikes. Pollinators arrive in droves to pollinate this very unusual but architectural perennial from South America. High deer resistance.

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Eryngium x tripartitum

Easy to grow, though short lived (2-3 years) this prolific seeder will never really disappear from your garden. A hybrid by two UNKNOWN species one from South America and the other one is anyones guess. First year its a rosette of spoon shaped green leaves. The following year it dramatically rises to 3′ in spring/summer and produces clouds of rounded steel blue flowers. Very pretty and airy and you must mix it with a nice tall ornamental grass for the ultimate effect. As I mentioned it then seeds around. Interesting cut flower.  Drought tolerant and best in full sun. High deer resistance.

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Eryngium yuccafolium

Rattlesnake MASTER! Great common name for a wonderful perennial that fits the modern aesthetic perfectly. Low rosettes of silvery serrated pointed leaves are subtle. In summer 30″ branched spikes produce rounded clover-like white balls- these are the flowers and they remain showy for weeks and weeks before finally turning brown in late summer- that the time to remove them. This robust member of the carrot family is sure draw for pollinators and even works well as a huge architectural cut flowers ( the flowers up close kind of smell bad- never smell an Eryngium you’ll regret it) but the fragrance is only detectable up close. Amazing with ornamental grasses. A flower with great presence that makes everybody else look better. Photographs well. Full sun to very light shade in any well drained site. Light to little summer water. Completely winter deciduous. High deer resistance. Rosettes increase with time and so do blooms spikes. Long lived.

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Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’

Bold cold hardy bulb that we cherish for its rosettes of huge wide deep purple foliage as it emerges in spring/early summer. By the middle of the season stems extend from the middle of the plant with unique columns of dense pink/white flowers. On top is a hat of leaves. Reminds me of a garden form of Carmen Miranda. The resemblance is where we get the common name of Pineapple lily.  Give this big spreading perennial space. Following the flowers the wide, heavy leaves will turn more greenish and lay down. That means they will swamp any delicate neighbors nearby. At least 2′ of clearance on each side. Multiplies happily in rich, deep soil in full sun. Regular summer water restricts stress and keeps the leaves happily vertical. Long lived and hardy. South Africa.

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Euphorbia rigida

This plant is an early spring blooming staple of gravel gardens and pairs great, vivid, chartreuse  flowers with symmetrical blue/gray succulent trailing foliage. To 18″ tall and up to 3′ wide when happy. Vivid flowers first color up in late winter and remain shockingly beautiful well into spring. Often re-seeds in open disturbed sites. Seedlings are easy to spot and dispatch or move. Give this trailing plant room to grow in full sun and very well drained soil of average to poor fertility. it thrives in rich soil and may become a tad rambunctious and may be shorter lived. Average conditions. A natural friend for blue flowered plants.

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Euphorbia x ‘Copton Ash’

Well behaved lovely early summer blooming Euphorbia hybrid with fine blue foliage and umbels of chartreuse flowers that remain effective on the plant for 4-6 weeks. Easy to grow clump forming perennial that is winter deciduous. Foliage to 10″ tall supporting the flowers to 14″ high. Sterile hybrid- will not reseed or become a pest. Long lived perennial for full sun and rich to average well drained soil. Light summer water. Excellent en masse. Cut back spent stalks in winter to make way for a whole new crop of stems/flowers. Good deer resistance. Drought tolerant.

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Euphorbia x ‘Dean’s Hybrid’

FANTASTIC long long blooming easy to grow and STERILE Euphorbia hybrid. Large clumps support wide umbels of electric gold flowers. They appear in spring and are effective on the plant well into summer. Foliage is fine, mid green and is a great backdrop to the never ending flowers. Semi-evergreen. A beautiful and valuable perennial for full sun and well drained soil. Little summer water required. Excellent heat tolerance and performance in hell strips. To 2′ tall and forming clumps a little wider. Mix with Salvias, Eryngiums for  visual perfection and the same culture. Moderate deer resistance.

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Euphorbia x ‘Purple Preference’

Excellent Euphorbia hybrid selected for deeply hued purple foliage that it pairs with early spring panicles of large chartreuse yellow flowers. Semi-shrubby evergreen perennial for RICH soil that drains quickly and light summer irrigation. The foliage goes through several hues before settling to deep green (purple to mustard to green). To 3′ tall and half as wide. Completely sterile hybrid that will not reseed or become a pest. Long season of bloom and interest. Appreciates the good conditions.

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Festuca californica

Native to the Willamette Valley and once widespread before being pushed to the margins by exotics and development. The best place to find this clump forming evergreen grass now is on slopes, almost always underneath Oaks. As you go farther south it becomes more widespread. Our seed grown plants come from exceptionally blue foliaged plants. Grows during the winter and looks clean and fresh then. In spring 3′ tall inflorescences arrive and are straight and airy. Following bloom in summer the stems of these blooms take on raspberry tints and remain standing. Totally summer drought adapted  but a little irrigation will improve summer looks. To 1′ x 2′ as a clump of evergreen foliage. Full sun to part shade in average to enriched, well drained soil. Light summer water. Best in wild areas and margins. Looks a tad too wild for some. Check it out in person and see how you feel.  Excels around Manzanitas, Cistus, Ceanothus and in dry shade in woodlands. Oregon native plant.

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Festuca roemeri

Idaho Fescue is a native bunchgrass found on upland prairies and slopes throughout the PNW. In the Willamette Valley it survives on the upward margins of woods, often under Oaks and accompanying California fescue. Roemer’s Fescue as it is also called has much finer leaves and a tighter clump than Festuca californica. Its immediately identifiable by this thin blue green foliage. A cool season grower it spends the winter in its freshest and lushest state by the onset of summer drought it has already gone cere (dry dormant). To 8″ tall and spreading. 1′ spikes with tan flowers appear in late spring and remain erect until the entire plant goes summer dormant. With regular water and good drainage this grass will avoid summer sleep and remain green and lush. Excellent underplanting for drought adapted shrubs, or for the garden/wild lands interface. It spreads quickly by seed- its from here, you should expect that so keep it away from highly manicured areas. Its habitat in the Willamette Valley has shrunk to almost nothing. Bring this pretty native bunchgrass back to our gardens. Admirable lawn substitute. Evergreen. Oregon native plant.

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Festuca rubra ‘Patrick’s Point’

A west coast native grass that ranges from British Columbia to Southern California- usually near the beach. This form is exceptionally blue and so pretty as a year round evergreen presence. To 9″ tall and spreading at a measured rate by stolons slowly expanding the plant to several feet wide. Forms an incredibly dense cover and weeds will seldom compete with this climate adapted grass. In late summer and not profuse 8″ stems hold gray floral spikes. This is along lived, easy to grow grass that does not die out in the center or poop out after a few years. In fact it would make an admirable lawn substitute. This form is from Humboldt, County in CA and was named for the small town where Greg lived as a child- so we had to grow it. And damn it turned out to be a fine, evergreen, native grass. Full sun to light shade and little to no summer water once established. Not fussy about soil and not a rambunctious thug unless soil is overly enriched- instead give it oxygenated average soil.  Excellent among drought adapted shrubs and especially nice interplanted with Pacific Coast Iris. Fine dense foliage is bright blue in summer turning to more of a greenish hue during the cooler months. Excellent winter appearance. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Filipendula palmata ‘Variegata’

Obscure large herbaceous perennial that finds a happy home in the rich soil and regular moisture of woodlands and margins. To 5′ tall the handsome palmate leaves are edged in white with occasional splashes in the interior. In mid summer plumes of foamy white flowers tower over the plant. Very pretty. Completely deciduous in winter. In time it forms large patches. Woodlands, the back of the border, perpetually wet areas.

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Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’

Gold plants are so popular in our climate perhaps because they add light to the garden when the sky is leaden and dark. This brilliant handsome perennial does just that. Bright gold pinnate leaves are arranged in a circular rosette to 2′ across. In summer 20″ spikes rise and produce foamy white flowers. A good combination overall. Rich, moisture retentive soil in part shade to shade. It doesn’t go green in shade either- remains vibrant. Excellent woodland focal point and adaptable to permanently wet sites. Long lived easy to grow perennial.

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Fragaria chiloense ‘Aulon’

Pacific coastal strawberry is a beach native- in fact it occurs all around the Pacific Rim and makes an adorable and durable ground cover on sand dunes. Well this version is like the giant hulk of strawberries. Huge in every way and vigorous? Wow, plant and get out of the way. The large glossy evergreen leaves are up to 6″ across and the single white flowers in spring and summer (sometimes in winter) are large also. The paltry fruit that follows is far from edible. It won’t kill you but you really have to like sour and gritty with millions of seeds.  This is an ideal ground cover for rough sites in full sun to part shade. Don’t bother enriching the soil that will just make this trailing monster roar. Instead err on the side of a little neglect and watch what this native plant can do. Be wary of delicate plants in the vicinity. Evergreen, easy and drought tolerant. Oregon native plant.

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Fragaria vesca ‘Alexandria’

Excellent strain of the delicious woodland strawberry. Forms clumping plants to 1′ x 1′ and a continuous parade of small white flowers means that the season of harvest of the small but sweet berries is equally as long. Line paths in a woodland or just stick one where ever so that when you get hot and hungry in the garden you have snack at arms length. Really easy to grow hardy perennial. Burns in full hot sites, happier with protection from blasting rays and dry soil. Rich soil with regular water leads to results. Semi-deciduous in winter. Not bothered by pests. Well, maybe dogs, Dogs will sneak some berries when you aren’t looking. I love dogs. Oregon native plant.

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Fragaria vesca ‘Golden Alexandria’

Haute edible gardening meet haute ornamental gardening. This cheerful and bright woodland strawberry sets shade alight and continuous small white flowers turn into tasty red berries all summer long. Pair in part shade with Hakenochloa macro ‘All Gold’ Japanese forest grass for a great color echo and contrast in leaf shapes. To 6″ tall and maintaining a clump in part shade and rich, moisture retentive soil. May self sow and gold seedlings are easy to spot and move or give away. Such a good idea for many reasons.

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We love ultra hardy Fuchsias, they are so carefree and they bloom and bloom. We found this Fuchsia in a garden near our shop. It was identified by our friend Annie Hayes at Annie’s annuals. Large growing subshrub to 5′ x 6′ in time. Red sepals surround a deep purple corolla with each petal marked with a strip of hot pink. Lovely. Flowers are large for a hardy Fuchsia and are profuse from June to frost. Fuchsia mite resistant. Very easy to grow in light shade to full sun. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water is ideal. Very established plants can make due with less. Freezes to the ground in the low 20’s- but not every year. Wait until new growth emerges then remove the frozen material. Loved by hummingbirds as well as gardeners. Lustrous  deep green foliage outlines the pendant flowers. You’ll never lose this long lived plant to winter. Good to try where rabbits are a problem.

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Fuchsia ‘Dancing Stars’

Adorable Fuchsia that is a prolific bloomer. Widely spreading diagonal stems support curtains of pendant small flowers. The sepals and floral tube are white and the corolla is violet purple. Each flower provides its own contrast but in masses they are beautiful. To 2′ x 3′ in a single season in rich, moisture retentive soil with good drainage. Regular summer water. Apply a handful of all organic fertilizer in mid-spring. Dies to the ground in the first hard freeze, resprouts from the base in mid-spring. Great container Fuchsia. Apply a thick mulch of compost for the first autumn and plant deeply for added winter protection.

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Fuchsia ‘Dying Embers’

Striking hardy Fuchsia with stunning deeply hued flowers. Sepals are deep wine colored and a corolla of nearly black fading a bit upon opening to deep maroon. Very floriferous Fuchsia with masses of small flowers over a bushy upright growing sub-shrub. To 3′ x 3′ in rich, well drained soil in part shade. Regular summer water and give it a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring. Dies to the ground in very hard freezes and resprouts vigorously in mid-spring. Wonderful plant for borders, the edge of woodlands and even containers. Glossy foliage is very handsome too. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring- then you’ll know what is dead and what to remove. Very hardy variety.

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Fuchsia ‘Galfrey Lye’

Flowers! Flowers! Flowers! This extraordinary hardy garden Fuchsia produces masses upon masses of long tubular flowers. The floral tube and sepals are white and corolla is deep rose with distinct orange tints. To 2.5′ tall and as wide in a single season. Heavy bloom begins almost immediately and continues unabated to frost. Excellent container Fuchsia and in the garden give it rich soil that is moisture retentive but drains. Incorporate plenty of compost into the soil and add a handful of all organic fertilizer at planting. Mulch the first winter and plant deeply to protect the crown. Once established it is reliably hardy. Freezes to the ground below 26ºF. Returns in mid-spring from the base and almost immediately starts blooming. Regular summer water. Full sun to part shade. (Avoid the reflected heat of a wall). Excellent performance on open north exposures where there is bright light but protection from intense heat/sun.

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Fuchsia ‘Insulinde’

Not the hardiest Fuchsia but by all means one of the showiest. This improved form of ‘Gartenmeister’ is taller  with longer brilliant orange red flowers. Tubular pendant flowers in groups to 3″ long. They appear in a massive and continuous display for months petering out around frost. To 30″ tall and very upright- just half as wide. The foliage is a distinct maroon/burgundy which sets off the hot colored flowers nicely. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Part shade to full sun (but not against a hot wall) with water. Incorporate a handful of all organic fertilizer at planting. To over winter this more tender than normal beauty plant deeply, mulch in autumn heavily, and even pile some dry leaves around the crown. It may return from the base if we have a mild winter (above 20ºF). Otherwise its a stellar container constituent. Hummingbirds.

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Fuchsia ‘Jim Muncaster’

A truly cold hardy Fuchsia with excellent attributes. Wine red stems reveal single flowers with a raspberry red petals that surround an opulently deep aubergine purple corolla. Upright sub-shrub to 2′ x 2′ or larger following a mild winter. Perfectly hardy to cold down to 0ºF. Elegant, profuse blooming care free fuchsia for part shade and rich, moisture retentive well drained soil with regular summer water. Emerges quickly in spring growth surpassing damaged wood quickly and often in bloom by early June. Blooms non-stop until frost. Completely reliable garden Fuchsia.

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Fuchsia ‘Preston Guild’

Excellent hardy Fuchsia with very pretty flowers. The sepals are white with a bit of green on the tips. The corolla emerges purple/blue and fades slightly to violet. Upon opening the sepals slowly open and then gracefully recurve over the top of the flower. It reminds me of origami. Very upright growing plant to 2.5′ tall and just 18″ wide in a season. Constant bloomer from June to frost and beyond. Freezes to the ground below 26ºF and returns vigorously from the base in spring. Plant deeply for extra winter protection for the first season. Mulch with compost in autumn. Add a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring. Regular summer water in full sun to part shade to quite a bit of shade. Easy garden Fuchsia with lovely flowers. Hummingbirds, bumblebees, be-sotted gardeners, big containers.

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Fuchsia ‘Ravenslaw’

Cool name for a cool garden Fuchsia. To 2′ x 3′ in a single season. The large, single flowers are “selfed”. That is both the sepals and corolla are the same color of soft red. Very profuse blooming and the large flowers have exceptional grace. Cold hardy, easy to grow Fuchsia that is also remarkably heat tolerant. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, moisture retentive soil that drains. Regular summer water speeds growth and enhances bloom. Plant deeply for added winter protection in the first season and mulch with compost the first autumn. Add a handful of all purpose organic fertilizer in spring- Fuchsias dearly love fertilizer. Freezes to the ground below 26ºF, resprouts vigorously from the base in spring. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring. Very cold hardy. Full sun only with regular summer water. Avoid reflected heat.

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Fuchsia ‘Thomasina’

One of our favorite garden Fuchsias for its unique flower color and prolific blooming habit. Sepals are terra cotta orange with green tips and the corolla is rich auburn red. Very nice. To 14″ x 2′ in a single season. Excellent container Fuchsia where you can match the cool flower colors for a great effect. Part shade to high overhead shade in a cool position. Rich, moisture retentive soil with mulch in fall. Dies to the ground with the first hard freeze and returns quickly from the roots in spring. Plant deeply to ensure greater winter protection for the first season. Fuchsias adore fertilizer- give ‘Thomasina’ a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring. They also respond heartily to liquid fish emulsion. Blooms June to frost.

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Fuchsia hatchbachii

Regal, rambunctious and totally hardy climbing Fuchsia species with handsome long glossy green leaves and masses of small glossy red and purple tilted flowers on long stems. To 8′ tall in a single season it is one of the cold hardiest of the genus and wood is seldom frozen back all the way to the ground. its hardiness ensure early growth and subsequent bloom. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, well drained soil with light, consistent summer irrigation. Though it will subsist on less. Long lived large plant that can increase by suckering as well as top growth. The vivid glossy flowers are tilted outwards beckoning nectar seeking animals. Wood is hardy to 15ºF- the hardiest of any Fuchsia that we grow. Give it room and support. May be grown as a free standing shrub.

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Fuchsia magellanica ‘Hawkshead’

Fuchsias don’t have to be over the top with huge double flowers the size of wadded up tissue. Nope. This is one of the very best and it makes due with profuse all white flowers- the tips of the sepals are dipped in green. Vigorous hardy Fuchsia that reaches 4′ x 4′ in a single season in rich, well drained soil with consistent summer moisture. Full sun (but with regular water and no reflected heat) to part shade. Masses of pendulous flowers appear from June to October. Loved by hummingbirds. This light airy sub-shrub combines perfectly in lush borders or as a single stunning specimen. Dies to the ground below 20ºF- re-sprouts from the base vigorously in spring. Easy, hardy, beautiful.

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Gaura lindheimeri

So so many new cultivars of this easy to grow free flowering perennial. And you know what? Some of them don’t even bloom that well and the color pink….a little nauseating. WE love the straight species and grow it from seed each year. Spreading rambunctious perennial with 3′ wands of five petalled white flowers. Full sun and virtually any soil- it can get really wild in rich soil, beware. Native to sand dunes on the barrier islands in Alabama/gulf coast but it loves it here. Begins blooming for us in late May and goes non-stop for months. If it gets tired or ratty simply cut the mother all the way to the ground, water it and wah lah there you go. Light summer water. Pollinator friendly perennial that has great drought adaptation when established. To 3′ wide.

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Geranium cinereum ‘Lawrence Flatman’

Many hardy Geranium have lost favor because they are either huge and unwieldy perennials or they don’t bloom for long enough. This one does neither. A low compact tuft of silvery foliage mostly stays put. Beginning in spring and continuously through summer simple copious purple flowers appear with a lavender back drop and dramatic darker raspberry veining. Very pretty- in combination with the foliage its a winner. Floriferous enough to be used in seasonal containers. This hardy geranium appreciates full, hot sun and open site and well drained soil. Light but consistent summer water. The flowering stems will elongate and climb  through nearby plants and flowers will show up where you least expect them. Foliage clump to about 18″ wide. Completely winter deciduous and not bothered by slugs or snails.

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Geranium cinereum ‘subcaulescens’

Where one needs a little blast of neon magenta this extraordinary and long blooming hardy Geranium can oblige. Clump forming plant with wiry trailing stems that wind through other plants before displaying the 1″ wide neon flowers. Full sun and rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. An excellent species for our climate. Carefree and long lived and that flower color- wow, nothing quite like it. Magenta.

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Geranium harveyi

Silver foliage and purple flowers an unforgettable combination on this smaller hardy Geranium that likes to spread. The dense foliage is compose of metallic silver leaves and would be enough of a reason to plant this dry loving plant. In combination with the the 3/4″ purple flowers and you have a real show. To no more than 6″ high an individual happy plant will spread to 2′ wide in a season. Blooms continuously for us all summer. Full sun and very well drained soil with light summer water. Excellent rock wall candidate or growing over a wall. Very good in seasonal containers as well. Cut back hard in early spring. Not bothered by slugs/snails.

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Geranium phaeum ‘Lily Lovell’

An older cultivar of the shade loving mourning widow geranium. Lily is set apart by deep purple blue large nodding flowers. To 28″ tall and forming an expanding clump of handsome serrated leaves this perennial requires protection from bright sun to really perform. But avoid dense shade, so we’ll say high overhead dappled shade or part shade. Grows in any soil but appreciates some amending to start out. Regular summer water. In rich soil it requires less. Blooms appear in late summer and pop off and on all summer. Really pretty color on an old fashioned but tough shade perennial. Not bothered by snails and slugs. Oh, thats why we love Geraniacae.

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Geranium sessiliflorum ‘Red Select’

Very pretty cocoa brown leaves have fine hairs on them that give them a kind of metallic sheen. Everything about this plant is the same uniform cocoa color save for the dime sized white flowers which appear continuously as long as its warm and provide welcome contrast. Mounding evergreen plant to 6″ tall and 20″ wide. Full sun and rich,well drained soil with regular summer water. Takes less water in richer soil. A very pretty and durable New Zealand native Geranium. Not bothered by slugs and snails.

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Geranium x ‘Rozanne’

Possibly the best hardy Geranium ever selected. Sky blue flowers with a slightly white center appear non-stop from June to frost on this vigorous and flowery perennial. To 18″ tall and twice as wide or more. Well drained soil of average to rich fertility with light consistent summer water. Planted adjacent to shrubs and trees this perennial may actually act as a climber- rambling up into lower branches and displaying its cheery blue flowers up high. Full sun to light shade and regular summer water. Winter deciduous. As with all hardy Geraniums it shows great resistance to slugs/snails. Unauthorized propagation prohibited. PP#12,175.

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Geranium x ‘Stanhoe’

Cute little spreading New Zealand Geranium with pewter brown leaves with  silver sheen and small off white/pink flowers all summer long. To 4″ tall but spreading to 11/2′ wide. Great in containers where the foliage provides contrast and the trailing stems clad in flowers arch over the edge of the pot. Very easy to grow and may self sow a bit. Easy to identify the seedlings to dispatch, transplant, or give away. Full sun to part shade and rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Not bothered by slugs and snails.

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Geum ‘Blazing Sunset’

Gems are so useful for us because they virtually laugh at heavy clay soils and still perform. But better is rich amended soil and they will bloom- in the case of this cultivar almost non-stop through the heat of summer. 2′ tall divided spikes yield fully double large brilliant orange red flowers. Opulent but with a wildflower charm at the same time. A big ol branch of flowers makes a great cut flower that lasts for ore than a week. Full sun to light shade and regular summer water. Remove spent flowers to encourage more- and there will be quickly. Forms a substantial patch in a few years. Very long lived perennial. Match with blue flowered Salvias for a thrilling visual bonanza. Completely deciduous in winter.

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Geum ‘Herterton Primrose’

Elegant spring blooming perennial that is very graceful, understated but beautiful. From rosette of lush leaves it sends up branched stems at the end of each is a soft primrose colored nodding flower from a madder red calyx. Wonderful. It remains in bloom and actually re-blooms from early April to early June. To 18″ tall in bloom and forming a patch several feet across. Full sun to part shade in rich, moisture retentive soil. Regular summer water is beneficial. Excellent and fun cut flower. Adapted to clay soils as many Geums are and a great reason to grow them in Western Oregon. Winter deciduous.

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Geum ‘Mandarin’

A very pretty British selection of this spring blooming perennial. Tall stems produce large single ruffly solid orange.flowers. Multiple flowers are born on one stem. To 2′ tall and forming  a patch as wide. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer moisture. Full sun to very light shade. Very easy long lived perennial. Wonderful flower color brightens spring borders beginning in April and extending to early July. Not bothered by pests or disease.

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Geum triflorum ‘Ochocos’

From one of our favorite mountain ranges in Oregon The Ochocos Greg spotted this great form of Prairie Smoke. Pretty spreading perennial with gray green divided leaves and in summer upright then nodding pink fur covered buds that mostly overlap small pink petals. Its glory shines when these flowers go to seed. The stems turn straight up and fluffy silver seed heads puff up and wave in the breeze like smoke. Full sun and well drained soil of average fertility. Light summer water. To 2′ x 2′ slowly. Completely deciduous in winter. Ultra cold hardy Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction. 

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Gillenia trifoliata (Porteranthus)

Indian Bow root is an elegant perennial native to the eastern U. S.. Finely divided handsome leaves rise up on 3 stems that support a myriad of small delicate pure white flowers in May/June. The foliage remains handsome following bloom and in autumn turns raspberry red  and holding before falling down. Slowly increasing clumps in rich soil with regular summer moisture. Full sun  to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Long lived carefree perennial. Extremely cold hardy. Winter deciduous.

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Gladiolus dalenii ‘Bolivian Peach’

Hardy happy and elegant perennial gladiolus that is perhaps just a species but market…y’know. To 3′ tall it opens soft peach and yellow wild looking flowers up a sturdy scape. Multiplies quickly in rich well drained soil and a patch will form yielding multiple blooms and a great source of cut flowers. Nothing like hybrid garden gladiolus instead decidedly more wild looking and we LOVE that. Very easy to grow, tough and hardy. Emerges late often not until April be patient. Regular summer water and full sun will prevent the towers from falling over. If they do simply cut them and bring them in the house. Moderate deer resistance.

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Gladiolus papilio

GLADZILLA! Thats what we call this rambunctious, prolific and all too easy species Glad. Blue/gray foliage gives way to serpentine spikes lined with curiously colored cup shaped flowers. The exterior of the petals is best described as dove gray. The interior is more complicated with zones of yellow, purple, and brown. Lovely cut flower.. The scape rarely stands straight up- accept that, it makes cool arrangements. In the ground its kind of a monster. It lives to multiply and in soil that too rich you will end up with 100,000 in a short time. Don’t torture it just don’t pamper it. Great plant for the rough life of the back 40 or a forgotten corner of your yard. Don’t recommend putting it in a hellstrip as it would spread so fast you would soon find Gladzilla monoculture. Completely winter deciduous- nothing there. Emerges relatively late in spring but it goes fast. Excellent cut flower. Strong deer resistance. Water?  Yeah.. if you want.

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Gladiolus tristis ‘Moonlight’

Unusual species gladiolus that is actually an early spring bloomer and at night possesses a wild sweet powerful perfume. Very thin grassy foliage forms clumps to 10″ tall. It appears in autumn with the first rains after summer dormancy. In March flower spikes rise to twice as tall as the leaves an open wild looking simple luminous yellow flowers. They have fancy markings on the inside lower two petals. At dusk the perfume arrives and does it flow. I’ve smelled this flower from 20′ away on mild spring nights. It makes a great cut flower but this mysteriously diminishes the perfume. Full sun and VERY WELL DRAINED soil- such as a rock garden or a hillside. It dislikes competition so give it space. Excellent with a mulch of gravel. Don’t plant this in a crowded bed in rich wet soil it will die out or it will quickly be overwhelmed. Fun plant to grow. Needs no supplemental water cause its totally dormant by summer anyway.

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Glaucium flavum

Yellow Horned Poppy is a Xera favorite perennial. This true poppy bears a long season of large irredesant light yellow flowers. They appear in succession for 6-8 weeks into the middle of summer. Flowers are replaced by long “horns” which are the seed pods. Incredibly blue glabrous rubbery foliage is wonderful with the glowing flowers. Full sun, well drained poor to average soil- adapts to rich soil with less water. Light summer water though established plants get by with nothing. To 2′ x 2′ in a single season. Dies back to a low rosette of leaves in winter. Will often seed around and you want this to happen cause the more of these the better. Average lifespan: 3-5 years. moderately deer resistant. No other pests. Excels in gravel gardens.

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Glaucium flavum ssp. auranticum

The brilliant ORANGE flowered horn poppy. Variety is the spice of life and we had of course to grow this form of one of our favorite perennials. HUGE true orange flowers are up to 5″ across and they glow from quite a distance. In combination with the blue rubbery foliage- WOW. Full sun and well drained poor to average soil with light to no summer water. Adapts to richer conditions but this will shorten its lifespan. Large blue long “horns” protrude from every direction where a flower was present. Self sows and comes true from seed. Leave the seedling where they are- transplanting this genus can be dicey. Enjoy it as the feral wildflower that it is. High deer resistance.  2′ x 2′. Dies to a low rosette in winter. Average lifespan: 3-5 years.

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Globularia cordifolia var. nana

Low growing globe daisy that makes a great small scale evergreen ground cover. In mid-spring rising up from the small paddle shaped leaves spikes are topped with spheres of fluffy steel blue flowers. Spreads moderately fast on  well drained sites with light summer water. Full sun to part shade. To 4″ tall- foliage prostrate and spreading to 18″ wide in several seasons. Great in rock gardens. Cold hardy, drought adapted and easy small scale plant.

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Globularia trichosantha

The bluest of blue globe daisies. This species is rare but shouldn’t be. It forms low evergreen rubbery foliage that is flush with the ground in mid spring 5″ tall spikes terminate in foamy cobalt blue multipetalled orbs. So blue. Full sun and well drained soil. Full sun- doesn’t do shade at all. In time it forms a dense small scale ground cover. Rock gardens, Hot slopes, Troughs, Occasional light summer water. It really is an easy plant to grow. And blue, so damn blue.

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Glumicalyx gosseliodes

Nodding Chocolate Flower. An unusual hardy perennial from very high elevations in South Africa. A spreading- trailing evergreen plant to 1′ x 1′ in a season. In summer above the rubbery stacked foliage dense groups of bud open to nodding orange flowers. The back of the slightly tubular flowers is pale cream- a nice dual color effect. Up close it pumps out the fine fragrance of chocolate. Blooms for about one month. Full sun and rich to average, well drained soil with regular summer water. Works well in containers and you have a better capacity to enjoy the flower fragrance. Easy to grow little perennial of great grace and it will often self sow when happy. Easy to grow.

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Gymnocarpium dryopteris

A fantastic, tough but elegant and demure fern known as the Northern Oak Fern and its native habitat is nearly circumpolar in the Northern Hemisphere including right here in the state of Oregon. Finely incised, delicate looking lime green foliage has an affinity to paper lace doilies. Completely deciduous this fern creeps by stolons to form large patches in part shade to shade. Best in soils that are somewhat light but endures even heavy clay soil. Light consistent summer water is ideal but established plants withstand considerable drought. This fern with an appearance so delicate is actually a survivor of a plant and is very easy and satisfying to grow. Dies back in the darkness of autumn and emerges mid-spring. Excellent deer resistance. Competes well with tree roots. Surprisingly rare in commerce. Oregon native plant.

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Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’

The all gold form of the legendary Japanese Forest Grass. Forms spreading clumps of arching gold foliage. A bit more upright than the variegated variety ‘Aureola’. To 2′ tall and 3′ wide in rich, well drained soil with regular summer moisture. Full sun (with water) to part shade. Fall color is rich amber. Winter deciduous.

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Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’

Legendary grass in the PNW. This striking form of Japanse forest grass has gold leaves striped in darker green. A clump forming perennial that arches gracefully. Lower growing than our other cultivar ‘All Gold’. Spreading to 3′ across in time this long lived deciduous beauty is indispensable in our climate. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer moisture. Full sun (but not reflected heat and with water) to part shade to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Woodland, walkways, borders, everywhere really where you need a touch of graceful elegance and a vivid color to brighten up dark days. Turns russet tones before losing its leaves in the fall.

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Helianthemum ‘Annabel’

For several reasons this is a fantastic Helianthemum (Sunrose). Felted green/gray foliage is handsome as a backdrop to the masses of fully double pink flowers that appear for weeks. The single forms of Sunrose have flowers that last just one day but this double flowered form has flowers that individually last for days. It significantly lengthens the bloom time on this charming low plant. Blooms appear from mid May to July. To 10″ tall and spreading to an area 2′ x 2′ in several years. Full sun and well drained soil of rich fertility. Beautiful small scale groundcover for banks, drier borders, rock gardens. Its best to cut Helianthemums back hard when blooming has ended. Remove the blooming stems and part of the current seasons growth. In return you achieve a dense compact plant that will yield more flowers the following year. For pink-o-philes this is a must have plant and one of our favorites at Xera. Light summer water. Some deer resistance.

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Helianthemum ‘Cheviot’

Sunroses are great flowery perennials for hillsides and the front of borders. Low growing gray evergreen foliage is a great foil to the 1″ pale pastel apricot flowers that obscure the whole plant for weeks in mid-late spring. To 8″ tall  x 2′ wide. But back hard after flowering to encourage a denser more compact plant. Light, regular summer water is important- avoid total dust dry conditions. Mix with Pacific Coast iris and Penstemon heterophyllus ‘Electric Blue’ for a swoon worthy effect.

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Helianthemum ‘Henfield Brilliant’

Fantastic low growing gray leaved evergreen Sunrose for sunny slopes. Gray foliage is a great backdrop to the masses of brilliant deep orange flowers that obscure the foliage for weeks in April/May. To 6″ tall and several feet wide in just a few years. Light, consistent summer water in rich, well drained soil in full sun. Cut back hard after flowering to ensure a more compact, tidy plant. Blooms simultaneously as Spanish lavender (Lavandula steochas for a wonderful purple and orange blast of color.

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Helianthemum ‘Stoplight’

This little gray leaved evergreen shrublet becomes a fire of true red flowers for 4-6 weeks in mid to late spring. To 10″ tall and spreading to several feed wide in rich, well drained soil with light but consistent summer water. Better in soil that has been enriched with a bit of compost and light organic fertilizer. Each flower lasts just one day but they come in such profusion that the display is continuous for weeks. Excellent slope cover- rooting where stems touch the ground- ideal erosion control. Cut back hard after flowering has ended. Cut approximately 1/3 of the plant away and new fresh foliage will emerge creating a solid mound of foliage. Very brilliant Sunrose that we love.

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Helianthemum ‘The Bride’

The combination of silver evergreen foliage and the clear white pristine flowers of this perennial is exceptional. To 6″ and spreading May to June the foliage is obscurred by a daily supply of flowers. Very showy. Full sun and light but consistent summer water. Cut back hard when blooming has ended. This yields a more compact tideir plant. Good deer resistance. Banks, hillsides, parking medians.

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Helichrysum thianshanicum

Useful and tough shrub that is the whitest gray that you can imagine. Evergreen plant that forms a rounded shrub to 2′ x 3′. In summer tall spikes carry umbels of striking gold flowers. Very pretty. Adapted to the absolutely poorest soils and thrives without any appreciable irrigation. It may be cut back hard after flowering for a more compact plant. First rate foliage plant for contrast that does not rat out or go funky as older Lavender plants can. Extremely cold hardy and drought adapted. Native to Mongolia.

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Helleborus x ‘Amethyst Glow’ Winter Jewels ®

Kind of a nifty color breakthrough for the breeding team Ernie and Marietta O’byrne. We’ve been delighted with this soft pewter purple color on a vigorous group of plants that produce enormous blooms. To 2′ x 2′ for shade to part shade in rich, well composted soil. Light summer water. High deer resistance.

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Helleborus x ‘Apricot Blush’ Winter Jewels ®

One of our favorite strains of Hellebore hybrids by the O’Byrnes at Northwest Garden Nursery. Single, large flowers are blushed apricot, russet, to almost orange. Blooms January-April. Vigorous plants. Regular summer water in well composted soil in shade to part shade. To 2′ x 2′.  Great deer resistance.

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Helleborus x ‘Black Diamond’ Winter Jewels ®

The darkest black flowers on a Hellebore that we have encountered. Jet black flowers have a sheen. Great in combination with the deep maroon/purple new foliage. To 2′ x 2′ blooming from January-April. Light, consistent summer water in part shade to shade. Completely deer resistant.

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Helleborus x ‘Blue Diamond’ Winter Jewels ®

Well, blue may be a stretch but this difficult to photograph hue at least attains hints of the color. More aptly its a luminous pewter shade that seems to reflect light in a metallic way. Strong growing perennial for part shade to shade in rich, well composted soils. Regular summer water- though it takes dry conditions in the shade. In extreme drought the leaves will simply lie on the ground- rising up almost immediately with water. Blooms appear from late January and are effective until April. To 2′ tall and as wide in several years. Excellent in combination with the yellow flowered series ‘Golden Sunrise’. Highly deer resistant and long lived. Remove self sown seedlings which will unlikely come true to the parent. A special color.

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Helleborus x ‘Cherry Blossom’ Winter Jewels ®

One of the best strains from the master Hellebore breeders the O’Byrnes. The majority of these seedling feature semi-double or double blushed pink flowers. Even the single flowered plants are well formed and vivid. Part shade to shade in well composted soil with light consistent summer water. To 2′ x 2′ shortly. High deer resistance.

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Helleborus x ‘Cotton Candy’ Winter Jewels ®

Regal strain of double flowered Hellebores from the O’Byrnes. The colors vary but many are light pink with a pronounced picotee on each row of petals. And there are many. The more substance to the flower the longer it remains showy and these already bloom from February to April. To 2′ x 2′ vigorous plants for rich, well drained soil and regular summer water.

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Helleborus x ‘Golden Lotus’ Winter Jewels ®

Spectacular strain of hybrids with fully double flowers. They range in color from lime green to vibrant chartreuse/light yellow. Blooms appear in January and remain showy and effective for several months. The flower retaining their form after they have released their pollen. To 2′ x 2′ forming an expanding clump in part shade to shade in well composted garden soil. Light consistent summer water. Highly deer resistant. Evergreen.

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Helleborus x ‘Golden Sunrise’ Winter Jewels ®

The more we grow Hellebores the more we can advise which are truly the most spectacular to grow. ‘Golden Sunrise’ is a strain that sports true luminous yellow flowers (often with extra markings on the inside). Large vigorous plants whose foliage takes on yellow tints in winter- part of the yellow flower coloration shining through. Don’t be alarmed. These yellow flowers show up from a much farther distance than any other. Easy to grow shade perennial for well composted soil and light but consistent summer moisture. Deer resistant.

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Helleborus x ‘Jade Star’ Winter Jewels ®

Understated but beautiful strain of hybrids that have simple single flowers marked with jade green and brushed with maroon highlights. Finely divided leaves are handsome also. To 2′ x 2′ in rich, well composted soil in part shade to shade with regular summer irrigation. Completely deer resistant.

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Helleborus x ‘Ruby Wine’ Winter Jewels ®

We’ve fallen in love with this richly colored strain of Hellebores. Vivid and intense true wine red flowers are effective both up close and at a distance. Paired with the maroon new growth and you get a good looking total perennial. Hellebores bloom non-stop from February to April The large flowers of this strain do not fade with age. To 2′ x 2′ for part shade and rich, well composted soil. Light but consistent summer water.

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Helleborus x ‘White Pearl’ Winter Jewels ®

There is no doubt that white flowers show up the best from a distance and this is no different with Hellebores. This strain of variants on white has single to semi-double flowers often marked with dots of red or green. Elegant, fascinating flowers that remains showy for months. To 2′ x 2′ in part shade to shade in rich, well composted soil Regular summer water. High deer resistance.

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Helleborus x sternii ‘Pewter Leaf’

There are so many Hellebores flooding the market these days that this really good variety has been sidestepped. Bad move. It has so many great attributes that we can’t help but offer it. Large divided evergreen thick leaves are a scintillating metallic pewter. The undersides of the leaves are soft red. Great combination. In winter simple cupped celadon green flowers pop out of the top and remain fresh and showy for many weeks. To 2′ x 2′ and completely evergreen. Produces multiple stems as the years pass on. Excellently adapted to our climate and dry shade specifically. Light summer water in average to rich soil. Full sun to part shade to shade. High deer resistance. Long lived sturdy and pretty.

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Hemerocallis ‘Betty’s Pick’

One thing we know about Betty, she was obviously something of a size queen. We LOVE this unusual dwarf daylily that exhibits HUGE outsized startlingly beautiful flowers for 4-6 weeks early to mid summer. To just 14″ tall the outrageous yellow/chartreuse and mauve flower explode open and stretch to 6″ across. Its unbelievable . Forms a spreading clump with mid-green arching strappy leaves. Screams to be at the front of a border or where the context of the huge flowers can be appreciated. Full sun to light shade and rich, moisture retentive soil. Regular water through the bloom period enhances the already outrageous display. Completely winter deciduous.

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Hemerocallis ‘Demetrius’

HUGE pale yellow flowers are amazing on this re-blooming compact Day lily. Flowers are each 5″ wide and open born on a 2′ tall x as wide perennial. Blooms June-August. Winter deciduous. Full sun and regular summer water. Not deer resistant. But hardy and long lived.

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Hemerocallis ‘Elizabeth Salter’

Billed as a re-blooming Day lily it really does. Huge, opulent coral pink flowers to 4″ across open for weeks in midsummer. Compact growing cultivar to 30″ tall and forming a clump as wide. Amazingly soft flower color. Very showy in bloom. Huge flowers rise just above the foliage. I’ve had some re-bloom at the end of summer in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Drought adapted though and little water will likely not result in re-bloom. Semi-evergreen variety. Easy, long lived spectacular day lily for borders, general landscapes. The flowers are sweet and edible.

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Hemerocallis ‘Pearl Cove’

We don’t grow many Day lilies. To be honest they are kind of done. But we have chosen a half dozen that we think add a lot to a garden. This variety is not only subtly beautiful with complex soft colors, it will often re-bloom through the summer if given ideal conditions. What are those? Rich, moisture retentive soil with regular, dependable irrigation through the hot months. The 3″ flowers have hints of cream, golden yellow, soft pink and even apricot. Delicious- as they are edible too. A long lived perennial that forms an expanding clump to 2′ tall and more than two feet wide. Full sun to the very lightest shade. Loved by butterflies. A good looking, long lived, trouble free plant. Completely deciduous in winter.

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Hemerocallis citrina

A good friend of ours who is a day lily savant told us that we had to have this plant. So adamant was he that he sent us a good sized clump. Holy cow was he right on. This is a large elegant perennial with elongated light yellow flowers that have a POWERFUL sweet citrus blossom aroma. The scent ramps up greatly at night and can be detected many feet away. Tall growing species as the flower scapes rise to almost 5′ tall. Each one holds multiple flowers. They close a little during the day but in the afternoon they slowly yawn open and POW! Here comes the perfume. Grassy foliage rises to about 2′ and a clump gets very large in rich, well drained soil with ample summer moisture. Full sun to very light shade. Give this big guy room to shine. Blooms for us July to September. Completely deciduous in winter. Big thanks Duane.

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Hesperaloe parviflora

Red Yucca. Who would have thought that this remarkably adaptable plant would grow perfectly in such places as Phoenix, AZ AND Portland? We’re amazed and this excellent semi-succulent plant is one of our favorites for hot dry landscapes. The evergreen leaves form rosettes that spike up to about 2.5′ tall- blue green turning purple in colder weather. They are lined with little white hair filaments that add to the appeal. in summer flower spikes rise to 4′- many of them and hold tubular flowers that are succulent and red on the outside, when each yawns open it reveals a yellow center. Very cool. Full sun and average to poor well drained soil- though it does fine in any soil type that drains well. Excellently adapted to life in the blasting hot hellstrips. It can take any kind of reflected heat with no summer water and still perform beautifully. Clumps increase slowly in our climate. Excellent in containers as well. Loved by hummingbirds. Little to no supplemental water ever. Cold hardy below 0ºF. High deer resistance.

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Heuchera ‘Huntsman’

A really good Heuchera that works well in the garden and not just containers. Maple shaped leaves are bronze with a darker central zone forming a mound 1′ x 1′. From April to August a continuous parade of clouds of pink flowers held on 30″ wiry stems. Very pretty and creates an ethereal effect. Evergreen for rich well drained soil that retains moisture. Regular summer water. Better bloom in full sun though tolerant of part shade. Long lived carefree perennial.

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Heuchera cylindrica

Green Alum Root. Fantastic native Heuchera found east of the Cascades but a stellar garden plant on the west side too. Handsome scalloped leaves form a tight evergreen clump. For weeks and weeks in late spring to summer 20″ spikes have columns of small green flowers at the top. Very pretty. Amazing massed in part shade and rich to average well drained soil. Regular summer water though established plants thrive on very little. A pretty Oregon native perennial. Thrives in such diverse places as partly shady hellstrips to the front of borders. Not bothered by pest and disease and much more durable than the hybrids. Easy to grow. Climate adapted. Oregon native plant.

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Heuchera x ‘Canyon Delight’

This is a really good garden Fairy Bells that has performed for years in our garden. Its derivative of two western species and boy does it know how to bloom. From a low evergreen matt of nice looking maple shaped green leaves it send many many 2′ stems bearing clouds of true red flowers. Each flower is clad minute fur giving the extra substance. A saturated color that appears in our climate for up to two months beginning in April. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in rich, well drained soil with light summer water. Avoid boggy soils in summer. Its a carefree, long lived perennial that really performs in landscapes. Visited frequently by hummingbirds (yep). Create a clouds of rich red. Evergreen.

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Hosackia (Lotus) formosissimus

Curious and rare coastal native plant that can be found in permanently wet sites. This gives you a clue about how to grow this striking little pea. Wide stretching arms deliver pink and yellow flowers in clusters at the tips. Blooms April to July. Native along the immediate coast from the Bay Area in California north to British Columbia. Never common in its range. Stream banks, seeps, the margins of ponds for full sun and perpetually moist soil. Excellent for use in rain gardens (bioswales). Often short lived in gardens where it is dry. You must supply constant moisture. To 8″ tall by 4′ wide. Oregon native plant.

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Impatiens omieana

People love this perennial (hardy) Impatiens- they are immediately drawn to its very pretty foliage and for most of the season thats all there is. Spreading as a low herbaceous perennial to just 16″ tall but many feet wide when happy. Rich, loose, hummusy rich soil that drains quickly with regular irrigation. Part shade to quite a bit of shade. Ideal under large shrubs, in shady spots. Each pointed leaf is minutely scalloped with a red to yellow central vein. The undersides of the leaves are madder red. In autumn relatively large tubular ( or police helmet shaped) flowers of soft yellow appear at the tips. The show is late and to be honest most people kind of miss it. Completely winter deciduous. Avoid blasting hot sun and compacted soils.

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Impatiens omieana ‘Ice Storm’

Pretty version of this hardy perennial impatiens. It forms mounds of lush foliage that has a light icy sheen on the surface of the leaves. If you look closely at this cultivar the leaves actually sparkle as if they were inlaid with crystals. Groovy. To 2′ x 3′ spreading in part shade to shade in rich, well drained soil. Consistent summer moisture. In autumn the tops of the plant bears many tubular light yellow flowers that are surprisingly large. Completely winter deciduous.

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Impatiens omieana ‘Silver Pink’

Large, bold foliage perennial for shade. Vigorous dome forming plant with large maroon/green leaves with a central pink mid-rib. In mid-autumn subtle but large light yellow flowers appear. To 2′ x 3′ for rich, well drained soil and regular summer irrigation. Good drainage is helpful as well. Contrasts nicely with gold leaved plants. Avoid hot sun and dry conditions. Great with an annual application of compost. Winter deciduous. More vigorous and shower than the species. Great under large established shrubs. Winter deciduous.

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Indigofera decora

Chinese Indigo is one of our favorite perennials/subshrubs. Arising from the ground in late spring the arching stems to 3′ support 6″ long pendant pale rose pink flowers for months and months. No intervention needed from the gardener. In time it suckers to form 4′ wide patches. Regular water to establish in average to rich, well drained soil. Full sun. Freezes completely to the ground in winter- cut back defunct stems from the previous year in early spring. When it does emerge its a very quick trip to up and blooming. Incredibly drought tolerant when established but light consistent watering seems to encourage new flowers- as it grows it blooms so you want to keep it growing. Incredibly elegant but tough plant that asks for so little but gives so much.

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Iris cristata

Precious! Amazing little spring blooming iris from the eastern U.S. Tiny green fans of leaves creep along the ground and form interconnected colonies with their long rhizomes. In late March into April 3″ wide soft blue and white flowers appear out of nowhere. The rise above the low foliage to 5″ high. PRECIOUS. The lower petals (the falls) have a zone of darker blue and orange. PRECIOUS. Part shade in rich woodland conditions- excellent under established shrubs or at the fore of borders in the forest. Regular summer water. High deer resistance. Completely disappears in the winter. PRECIOUS. Little spring wonder from the east.

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Iris douglasiana (Pacifica) ‘Burnt Sugar’

A groovy selection of our coastal native evergreen douglas iris. From spikey grassy clumps rise 2′ tall flower spikes topped with multiple blooms that are amber and maroon, intricately marked on the interior falls. Blooms April to June. Vigorous clump forming perennial for any soil type where there is not standing water. Regular water to establish the first season then none in subsequent years. Full sun. High deer resistance.  To 2′ wide in a few years. Oregon native plant.

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Iris douglasiana (Pacifica) ‘Canyon Snow’

Pretty, floriferous and reliable form of Pacific Iris that forms large impressive evergreen patches and in April/May large white flowers with a touch of yellow on the lower petal. To 18″ and spreading to form large colonies in full sun to quite a bit of shade. Virtually any soil. Tolerates summer irrigation if the drainage is excellent otherwise follow a dry summer regime. High deer resistance. Evergreen. Oregon native plant.

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iris foetidissima ‘Variegata’

Useful, pretty foliage plant in a genus most known for flowers. The 1.5″ wide leaves are striped in white and dark green. Each evergreen leaf rises to 15″ and then arches over. In time it forms large showy clumps. In late spring small not very striking brown flowers appear and are followed by much more showy orange berries that appear in fall and persist. To 2′ wide in time. Part shade and rich soil with regular summer water. Avoid blasting hot locations and dry, compacted soils. Great winter appearance and totally hardy to cold. Limited quantities. Excellent deer resistance.

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Iris japonica ‘Eco Easter’

Superior form of this evergreen Japanese Iris species. Sprays of orchid like light blue/white/orange frilly flowers arch from the central clump in early to mid spring. Evergreen fan shaped foliage is good looking year round. To 18″ tall and 3′ wide. Part shade to high overhead shade in rich, well drained soil with regular consistent summer irrigation. Very long lived. This form is more floriferous with bigger flowers. Excellent cut flower. A natural for Japanese gardens. Easy to grow.

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iris lazica

Formerly lumped with the winter blooming Iris- I. unguicularis this larger form blooms later February into April. Large simple violet blue flowers appear within the large evergreen foliage. Foliage is large, one inch wide, rich green, and good looking all the time. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. Very very drought tolererant when established. Low maintenance plant that works very well as a small scale year round ground cover. to 14″ tall and spreading several feet wide. High deer resistance. Long lived. Excellent in concert with Hellebores, Cardamine trifolia, and Cyclamen coum.

 

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Iris unguicularis

The winter blooming Iris or grass Iris makes us smile as the intense purple/blue flowers with intricate yellow and white markings appear sporadically from November to spring. Grassy upright green foliage offers some weather protection for the flowers which come off and on in mild stretches. Not over the top showy but the individual flowers are stunning at a time of the year when stunning is in short order. Spreads to form evergreen colonies in full sun and well drained soil. Little supplemental water once established. High deer resistance. Long, long lived perennial persisting in old gardens for decades. Place it where you can see it in the winter. Near an entrance for example

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Iris unguicularis ‘Walter Butt’

Not a very enchanting cultivar name but a useful and distinct flower color variant of Algerian Iris. This winter blooming species produces large pale lilac/ivory flowers from November-sporadically until March. The 4″ flowers are nestled in the grassy evergreen foliage but are a light enough color to read from quite a distance. This for is perhaps best planted with the species to produces contrasting flower colors for more depth. To 1′ tall and twice as wide in several years. Full sun to very light shade in well drained soil of average fertility. Not quite as cold hardy as the species but it has to get pretty damn cold (below 5ºF) for damage to occur and that just never happens. Long lived perennial. High deer resistance. Low summer water requirements.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Baby Lilac’

I found this naturally occurring hybrid at the intersection of the species Iris tenax and Iris douglasiana in the southern Oregon coast range. This is a sturdy evergreen large clump forming Iris with large pale lilac flowers with intricate markings on each lower petal. Full sun to part shade in virtually any soil with little summer water. Excellent plant for wild areas. Cold hardy. Leaf clumps look excellent year round. Highly deer resistant. Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Big Wheel’

Astonishing flower color is one reason to love this large flowered Pacifica hybrid. Orange/coral/pink all morphed into one hue with a central zone of deep purple near the center. To 1′ tall and forming spreading clumps of evergreen foliage. Blooms April-June. The large flowers are showy from quite a distance. Part shade is ideal but endures full sun and tolerates total shade. Water regularly through the first summer to establish- the clump should increase by twice its size then none in subsequent years. Resents disturbance best left where it is to live. Great deer resistance. A very unusual color for a PCI.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Blue Moment’

How can you not fall in love with a blue iris? Its so classic. This vigorous and easy to grow Pacific Coast Iris does blue very well. The large sky blue flowers are marked in the center of the fall with more intricate yellow and black hatch marks. Large growing PCI to 16″ tall and forming imposing clumps of tall evergreen foliage. Blooms late April through May. Full sun to part shade in any soil that drains. Not fussy but dislikes standing water. Water though the first summer to establish then none in subsequent years. Evergreen foliage is nice looking- dies down a bit in winter and returns in spring. Highly deer resistant.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Geoff’s’

Our good friend Geoff Beasley gave us this very easy to grow, pretty and floriferous selection of Pacific Coast Iris. The broad flowers are a combination of amber, maroon and even black hatch marks. To 14″ tall and produced from grassy spreading evergreen clumps. Full sun to part shade in virtually any soil with a modicum of drainage. Long lived perennial that is best left undisturbed once established. Blooms appear from late April through May. Highly deer resistant. Water for the first year to establish then none in subsequent years.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Meadow Pastels’

This is our own seed strain of Pacific Coast Iris. We save from specific plants and aim to include as many unusual colors as possible. Typically 1/3 are deep purple, 1/3 are amber/yellow and 1/3 are combinations of the two- whats left is the odd deep blue. Full sun to part shade in any reasonably well drained soil. Adaptable to clay. Regular summer water for the first year to establish then none in subsequent years. Blooms appear from late April through May. Height is variable but all make large clumps of grassy foliage over time. Do not disturb once established and remember that Pacific Coast Iris thrive on neglect. Excellent and wild looking cut flowers. Highly deer resistant. Xera Plants Introduction. The plant pictured is an example of an Amber seedling. Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Native Warrior’

Pacific Coast Iris can be dodgy to divide. You have to do it at the exact correct time in the fall just before they grow roots for the new year. Even then it takes a careful and gentle hand to produce viable divisions that will grow on and bloom. ‘Little Survivor’ must get its name from its ease of division. Either way its a fantastic PCI that begins blooming in late April and continues almost to June. Red and raspberry colored flowers are dramatic on a very compact plant to just 10″ tall. Grassy evergreen clumps of foliage do not obscure these precious flowers. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in any soil with reasonable drainage, including clay soils. Water for the first season to establish then none in subsequent years. Highly deer resistant. Long lived. Do not disturb once established. Neglect is its friend.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Rio Dorado’

Yellow is a special color for Pacific Coast Iris and this selection does a great job at producing profuse large luminous yellow flowers for an extended period. To 14″ tall and forming spreading clumps. The vivid flowers are showy from a distance and resonate with the candy-like colors of other Pacific Iris. Mix with ‘Blue Moment’ for a classic blue and yellow combination. This Iris also blooms simultaneously with the clouds of blue flowers of Ceanothus. And they appreciate the same cultural conditions- a late spring vignette that gets by on no summer water! Evergreen. Not fussy about soil. Water consistently through the first summer to establish (established Iris will double their clump size in the first summer). Then only what falls from the sky in subsequent years. Heavy bloomer in April-June. High deer resistance.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Tawny Meadow’

Our first deliberate cross of two Pacifica species has yielded a real looker. Half Iris innominata and half Iris tenax. It inherits the incredible amount of flowers from the first parent which is yellow and more intricate markings and purple hues of the latter. Fun to grow colony producing grassy iris for full sun to part shade. Begins blooming in late April and continues for 3 to 4 weeks. Adaptable to many types of soil, including clay soils. Water regularly through the first summer to establish then none in subsequent years. This little iris ( to 8″ tall) is very wild looking and reminds us of natural hybrids that occur in the wild. In time when you have many flowers per clump it makes a charming cut flower. Two Oregon native perennials. Heh. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Violetta’

Far and away the darkest purple PCI that we’e encountered. This hybrid heavily draws fro the excellent and floriferous species Iris inanimate. Grassy fine foliage is evergreen forming substantial clumps in virtual any soil in part shade to full sun. One clump produces many flowers of the the deepest black purple. To 1′ tall and 2′ wide in time; Little to no summer water when established. Resents disturbance. Highly deer resistant.

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Iris x pacifica ‘Watercolor’

Of the 11 species of Pacifica species on the west coast the species I. munzii from the central Sierra Foothills imparts the best blue flower color. Typically a tall growing species to 16″ this cultivar creates amazing large flowers of soft washed blue with ivory edges. A very pleasant color that shows up well in gardens. Full sun  to part shade in rich to average soil. This cultivar likes a bit more drainage than others- a product of its I. munzii parentage. Blooms late April through May. Upright grassy deep green foliage is evergreen and forms large clumps over time. Best with a good amount of neglect as all Pacific Coast Iris demand. High deer resistance.

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Kniphofia ‘Lightning Bug’

We selected this Kniphofia years ago for its nearly white flowers and habit of reblooming throughout summer. Flowers begin in late spring and rise to 30″ tall and continue to be produced periodically until fall rains arrive. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water to re-bloom reliably. Apply an annual application of compost or all organic fertilizer to increase vigor, performance. Combines well with Agapanthus, Tulbaghia, Middle of the border. A nice contrasting bloom spike intermixed with subdued ornamental grasses. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Slowly increases its clump size. Semi-evergreen.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Kniphofia ‘Saffronvogel’

Superior re-blooming cultivar with glowing pale coral and cream flowers. Forms expanding clumps of grassy foliage and begins sending up 28″ spikes of flowers in early June. Quick repeat of flowering occurs for two more months in rich, moisture retentive soil with good drainage. Add an annual application of compost to increase vigor spur rapid re-bloom. Wonderful, ethereal flower color that is at home with pink/orange Agastache and the pale lilac flowers of Tulbaghia violacea ‘Big Violet’. Winter deciduous. Full sun to very light shade.

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Kniphofia ‘Shining Scepter’

Even though this poker blooms but once the color is so intense and the amount of flower spikes on one clump of plants so impressive that we have to include it. 3′ tall flower spikes support HOT orange solid colored flowers from June to July. The clump expands annually in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water. Full sun to very light shade. Winter deciduous. Very easy to grow hummingbird food.

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Kniphofia ‘Timothy’

For pale coral/pink flowers ‘Timothy’ is tops. From a clump of relatively few leaves multiple spikes of 3′ tall richly selfed flowers rise up. A beacon to hummingbirds and a great harmonious color in the garden. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water to spur re-bloom which will continue through the very hottest weather. An annual application of compost and all purpose organic fertilizer will result in more vigor, flowers, and re-bloom. Full sun to very light shade. Long lived elegant perennial. Nothing like the brash bicolor flowers of the old fashioned K. uvaria- the standard old poker. Excellent and dramatic cut flower. Removing spent flowers encourages more. Give the clumps room to expand with little competition from other plants. Moderate deer resistance.

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Kniphofia ‘Toffee Nosed’

Stunning poker with unusually colored flowers that are a kaliedescope of colors all within one spike. Opening tinted russet brown the expanding tubular flowers senesce to pale cream. To 4′ tall in bloom and forming prodigious clumps in rich, well drained soil. Regular summer irrigation spurs rapid re-bloom which can extend well into autumn. A clump with multiple flower spikes is spell binding. Hummingbird food. A fantastic and dramatic large cut flower. Foliage is semi-deciduous. Apply an annual layer of compost and a handful of all organic fertilizer in spring to increase vigor, blooming spikes. Fantastic with the ornamental grass Pennesetum spatheolatum. And any ornamental grass for that matter. Full sun to partial shade.

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Kniphofia pumila

Little known but spectacular poker that we love for its HUGE late summer flowers of shocking acid green. Each flower spike includes up to 1′ long spike of tubular flowers. Forms a large tropical looking grassy evergreen clump. Full sun and rich well drained soil with regular summer irrigation. Apply an annual application of compost to increase vigor. To 4′ tall in bloom the clump of grassy foliage expands to 3′ wide. Give it the room that it needs. Depending on the weather flower spikes can occur any time from June on but mostly cluster in Aug-Oct. Semi-evergreen. Moderate deer resistance. Cold hardy.

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Kniphofia thompsonii var. snowdenii

Cool, interesting and actually spectacular Kniphofia that has flowers more reminiscent of an Aloe. The 4′ spikes of blooms have tubular downward facing flowers that are not clustered together but rather separate. They range in electric hues from near red/orange to yellow. Forms a grassy clump of deciduous foliage that rises to just one foot high. Spreads by runners- NOT A  CLUMPER- give it room to spread, a single plant will roam several feet in every direction. Full sun to very light shade and RICH, well drained soil with light but consistent summer water. Excellent cut flower and dearly loved by hummers. Emerges late in spring.

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Lamium maculatum ‘Aureum’

This golden form of dead nettle is surprisingly vigorous and makes a glowing small scale ground cover. Mostly evergreen- unless it drops below 15ºF. From early spring to fall a continuous supply of spikes of light purple flowers. Each leaf is decked with a silver chevron. Part shade to full sun with regular summer water. To 6″ tall and 2′ wide when happy. Add a yearly layer of compost to increase vigor. A wonderful plant for lighting up the garden. Moderate deer resistance.

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Lathyrus vernus

One of the great joys of spring. Vernal Pea erupts in a fountain of blue/purple/magenta pea flowers for many weeks in spring. New foliage and flowers emerge simultaneously in early spring but blooming continues for an extended period. As the plant expands it becomes a 2′ x 2′ round mound. Following flowers the deep green foliage remains handsome through summer. Full sun to very light shade in rich, well drained soil with light but consistent summer water. Very, very long lived perennial. Not often available in great quantities as it is raised by seed and our crop is dependent on the viability of each years seed set. Very easy to grow. Not bothered by slugs/snails. Mix with early spring ephemerals, bulbs, Hellebores. Nice small cut flower.

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Lavandula angustifolia ‘Miss Katherine’

You don’t often think of lavender flowers in the color of pink, but this compact heavily flowering selection produces masses of clear pink flower spikes for months in summer. Mixed with purple and white flowered varieties and you get much more depth of contrast. The purple and white both look better. Compact gray foliaged shrub for average, well drained soil and light summer water. Full sun. To 2′ tall in bloom the foliage usually maxes out at a globe 14″ x 14″ . Cut back hard after blooming for a denser more compact plant. Fragrant flowers, foliage. Moderate deer resistance. Very easy to grow. Hedges, specimen. Etc.

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Lavandula angustifolia ‘Pastor’s Pride’

When you have a small garden you want to get as much bang for your buck as possible. Enter this great cultivar of English Lavender that blooms not just once but over and over again until frost. Medium lavender blue flowers cluster at the top of straight wiry stems to 10″ long. A naturally compact plant to about 2′ x 2′ ultimately. Silver evergreen aromatic foliage. Rich, to average well drained soil in full sun with light summer water. Somewhat drought adapted. Looks better , re-blooms better with light water. Saches, Lavender wands, potpourri- everblooming fragrant hedge. Very good Pastor. Very good.

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