Ribes laurifolium

Curious low, evergreen, winter blooming shrub that erupts in 3″ long pale, ghost green flowers from January to March. To just 2′ tall and spreading twice as wide its large rubbery, dark evergreen leaves are a great backdrop to the flowers. Just as nice the leaf petioles are a dramatic madder red. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer moisture. Part shade to high overhead shade. Excellent combined with Hellebores, Cardamine, Cyclamen coum- which all desire the same cultural requirements. Strongly horizontal habit. Blooms on wood from the previous year prune (very lightly) if needed after flowering has ended. Moderate deer resistance. AKA Laurel Leaf Currant. Wonderful on shady hillsides where it lights the winter months.

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Ribes malvaceum ‘Dancing Tassels’

Really excellent form of Chaparral Currant with 3″ soft pink flowers that appear at any point during winter well into spring. An evergreen shrub to 8′ x 5′ in 7 years. Surprisingly hardy for its origin- California’s Channel Islands.  Full sun to part shade  and well drained average soil. Great on a slope. Loved by overwintering Anna’s hummingbirds. Flowers are surprisingly cold hardy and are undamaged to the upper teens. If those that are open are spoiled by frost more will follow after the thaw. Very very drought tolerant, No supplemental water required when established. Loses most of its leaves in summer drought. Grows fairly quickly and is never a dense shrub- all the better to see the pendant flowers. Dry borders, shrub borders, winter gardens. This shrub loves our climate and is supremely adapted to a winter wet/summer dry regime.  Moderate deer resistance. Excellent winter blooming shrub. A beacon to Anna’s Hummingbirds.

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Ribes odoratum ‘Crandall’

This form of the famous eastern U.S. clove currant is fabulous not only because it is resistant to White Pine Blister Rust – and won’t transmit it to those trees- it bears large black, sweet edible fruit in summer. The chains of yellow flowers in March/April emit the adored fragrance of powerful cloves. Detectable quite a way away. To 4′ x 3′ in 5 years. Full sun to shade in rich to average well drained soil. Light summer water. Very adaptable and extremely hardy to cold. Fall color in our climate is yellow to orange. Self fertile. Protect fruit from birds. They really are a good quality black currant.

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Ribes sanguineum ‘Oregon Snowflake’

Excellent improved form of the already popular white flowered Flowering Currant. This form sports foliage that is deeply divided- very pretty- and a more dense and compact habit. Its an incredibly heavy blooming form that has great garden application. To 4′ x 5′ in 7 years with a rounded mounded habit. In late February- April pendant clusters of pure white flowers glow in the early spring sunlight. The buds emerge chartreuse and then become pure sparkling white. This was bred and selected at OSU. And so far has been rare on the market. Full sun to quite a bit of shade with light consistent summer water to establish. Then- it can survive on all that falls from the sky. Takes light irrigation in gardens but never soggy and never soggy during hot weather. Fall color is yellow/orange and brief. Sour fruits are dusky blue in summer. Moderate deer resistance. Derivative of an Oregon native plant. PPAF.

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Ribes sanguineum ‘Xera’s Lime Punch’

As luck would have it this lime/chartreuse foliaged variant of our locally native and cherished flowering currant appeared at our nursery. We’ve grown it for years now and it is so much tougher and more reliable than the closely related R. s. ‘Brocklebankii’. Hot pink flowers contrast in a great way with the lime colored vivid foliage. To 8′ tall and 4′ wide in 7 years. Part shade and regular water to establish the first year then none in subsequent years. Adaptable to many types of soils. Will not burn in full sun but isn’t as happy. Add pep to wild areas. Brighten up shady environs. Blue,very sour fruits appear in early summer. Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Ribes speciosum

Fuchsia flowering gooseberry is a fantastic shrub for dry shade. Heavily armed arching stems produce rows of pendant blood red flowers beginning in December and continuing to early spring. Retains leaves in winter – loses them in heat and drought. Little to no water once established. Best in part shade with good drainage. The millions of little red flowers are irresistible to over wintering Anna’s hummingbirds. Locate away from paths…the thorns on this California native shrub have a bite. To 5′ x 6′ in 7 years. Dramatic in bloom which lasts for months.  Tough and beautiful.

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Ribes x gordonianum

One of the most spectacular of the flowering currants. This hybrid between the yellow eastern Ribes odoratum and our locally native  pink flowered western Ribes sanguineum splits the good looks with chains of coral orange flowers with a faint yellow center. Salmon up close the color reads as orange from farther away. Blooms March/April for weeks on a large spreading shrub for part shade and rich, well drained soil. Consistent summer moisture- do not let it dry completely nor should it ever be soggy. Extremely cold hardy with orange/yellow fall color. To 8′ x 8′ in 8 years. Blooms on wood from the previous year- prune AFTER flowering if needed.

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With all the knock out, fleurshrubselekt® and every other patented type of rose its reassuring that this old gal still rocks them all. Betty bears clusters of slightly fragrant large single pink flowers. They are light pink w/ a slightly darker sheen to the surface of the petals which almost always open skyward. These upright facing groups of flowers yield not only a lot of color- it blooms constantly from May to frost, it gives the plant a wild appeal not seen in overly bred shrubs. The disease resistant foliage is mid green and handsome as well. To 4′ x 4′ forming a rounded shrub. It may be hard pruned in early spring if necessary. Remove spent flowers and more will quickly appear. Tough plant that gets by on a less than perfect watering regime.  Regular, deep watering (once a week max) will yield great performance. Established plants can take drought at the expense of re-blooming. Very easy to grow charming rose. Ultra cold hardy.

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Rosa ‘Darlow’s Enigma’

Curious climbing rose that puts on a non-stop display of sprays of intensely fragrant flowers that are diminuitive, white, and semi-double. The anise/fruit scented flowers begin in mid-spring and continue unabated until autumn. A large growing rose to 12′ tall and 8′ wide in time. Excellent trained on a trellis or pergola. Blooms on wood from the current season and may be hard pruned in early spring. This rose seedling was discovered in a garden in Eugene and its popularity has spread throughout the globe. The sweet fragrance will perfume an entire garden on a warm summer day. Captivating cut flower. Disease resistant and very tough rose that gets by on a minimum amount of summer water and still blooms. Regular water in rich soil amplifies this roses performance dramatically. Winter deciduous. Extremely cold hardy.

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Rosa ‘Lady Hillingdon’

Everyone needs at least one fluffy rose in their garden and this one deserves a place. A true tea rose introduced in 1910 it is also very cold hardy for this class.  Very double flowers emerge orange sherbet and age from the outside in to a soft pastel apricot- as per this class the petals are heavily scrolled. The nodding blossoms (a hallmark of a true tea rose) are somewhat loose with the powerful fragrance of dried black tea. Sweet and inviting. New foliage is maroon and transitions to deep glossy green. This is a wonderful backdrop to the ‘egg yolk’ colored flowers that virtually glow. Do not hard prune. Instead limit pruning to removing spent wood and the previous years spent blossoms. Blooms repeatedly from June to September- removing spent flowers encourages more. Full sun to part shade in rich, well drained soil with regular summer water for best bloom. Roses are heavy feeders and this one is no different. Begin its life with a large amendment of organic fertilizer to ensure a large and vigorous root system. Top dress with Alfalfa Meal in March. To 5′ on average and about 1/2 as wide.  For diligent gardeners it may be trained as a climber. Joke: This rose was often grown against warm walls in colder climates. Hence, the phrase: ‘Lady Hillingdon’ she’s bad in a bed but great against a wall. HARR! Thank you Marcella Garcia-Moore for this excellent rose. Available Spring 2019.

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