Ribes roezlii

Sierra gooseberry or sticky gooseberry is a pretty if prickly native deciduous shrub for rough areas. Charming in bloom , the 1/2″ pendant flowers have sepals that are reflexed and red around a pendant white corolla. After opening they both change to light red and remain showy for several weeks. They line zig zagging stems with three thorns at each node. That means  you must site this 7′ tall by 4′ wide arching plant carefully. The flowers are pretty viewed up close and turn into prickly translucent green/red drupes. These are eaten by a huge variety of wildlife and especially smaller birds. Often the shrub will be completely stripped of berries by the time the soft orange fall color appears. Native from the Cascades of Marion county south throughout inland California down to San Diego county CA. Its most often found in dry gravelly areas on slopes in full sun to deep woods where its habit is more restrained and open. Blooms appear in mid spring. Water lightly to establish the first summer then only what falls from the sky in subsequent years. Adaptable to dry shade if it is not completely dark. Moderate deer resistance. Very similar to another native Gooseberry Ribes lobbii which is discrete in its dull non sticky leaves. Wonderful native shrub.Rarely seen in habitat below 1000′.  Oregon native plant

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Ribes sanguineum ‘Oregon Snowflake’

Excellent improved form of the already popular white flowered Flowering Currant. This form sports foliage that is deeply divided- very pretty- and a more dense and compact habit. Its an incredibly heavy blooming form that has great garden application. To 4′ x 5′ in 7 years with a rounded mounded habit. In late February- April pendant clusters of pure white flowers glow in the early spring sunlight. The buds emerge chartreuse and then become pure sparkling white. This was bred and selected at OSU. And so far has been rare on the market. Full sun to quite a bit of shade with light consistent summer water to establish. Then- it can survive on all that falls from the sky. Takes light irrigation in gardens but never soggy and never soggy during hot weather. Fall color is yellow/orange and brief. Sour fruits are dusky blue in summer. Moderate deer resistance. Derivative of an Oregon native plant. PPAF.

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Ribes sanguineum ‘Xera’s Lime Punch’

As luck would have it this lime/chartreuse foliaged variant of our locally native and cherished flowering currant appeared at our nursery. We’ve grown it for years now and it is so much tougher and more reliable than the closely related R. s. ‘Brocklebankii’. Which seems like such a great idea but that most people kill. This is an easier to grow more robust plant. Hot pink flowers contrast in a great way with the lime colored vivid foliage. To 8′ tall and 4′ wide in 7 years. Part shade and regular water to establish the first year then none in subsequent years. Adaptable to many types of soils. Will not burn in full sun but isn’t as happy. Add pep to wild areas. Brighten up shady environs. Blue,very sour fruits appear in early summer. Grows quickly to its ultimate size. Moderate deer resistance. This is a wonderful shrub. (Big pride). Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

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flowers and foliage of Ribes sanguineum

Ribes sanguineum ssp. sanguineum

Flowering Currant. One of the most conspicuous flowering shrubs over the western half of Oregon. From extreme Southwest BC to northern California. .This v shaped and arching shrub protrudes from highway plantings like a chandelier of pink flowers. Each chain of flowers is a slightly different shade of pink to white on this batch of seedlings. To 9′ x 9′ forming  somewhat open shade. Blooms on old wood, prune if needed AFTER flowering has ended in late spring. Fall color ranges from pink to orange and quite often yellow. We had several shrubs of this plant on the property where I grew up. We randomly harvested the branches for cut flowers for almost two generations and none of the plants suffered. They were wild plants and as good as any named variety. Blooms March to April and then maple shaped leaves unfurl and are a quilted nice texture. Full sun to quite a bit of shade at the expense of flowering. Dusty blue fruits cascade in chains as the leaves drop in fall. These are immensely sour fruits.  Best on hillsides poking through the rest of the underbrush. Flowers which have a  slight skunk funk force easily if brought inside. One of Oregons greatest native flowering shrubs. Moderate deer resistance. Water to establish then only occasionally. Oregon native plant.

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Ribes speciosum

Fuchsia flowering gooseberry is a fantastic shrub for dry shade. Heavily armed arching stems produce rows of pendant blood red flowers beginning in December and continuing to early spring. Retains leaves in winter – loses them in heat and drought. Little to no water once established. Best in part shade with good drainage. The millions of little red flowers are irresistible to over wintering Anna’s hummingbirds. Locate away from paths…the thorns on this California native shrub have a bite. To 5′ x 6′ in 7 years. Dramatic in bloom which lasts for months.  Tough and beautiful. From an understory chapparel shrub in central California to a common component of that community in the south. Remember that it will go drastically deciduous in mid summer. It looks bad but this is temporary. As with many dry/mediterranean climate adapted shrubs it has a reverse dormancy. Fresh green and blooming during the cool wet season and deciduous and resting to wait out the heat. Prone to growing low and spreading at first then it sends up large vertical whips.

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Catalina perfume is the common name for this lovely, tough evergreen currant from Southern California. The round evergreen leaves which do remind one of a Viburnum are resinous and spicily fragrant, especially on warm days. To 3′ tall and spreading about 6′ -this low shrub is best adapted to part shade and little to no summer water. It is incredibly drought adapted. In late winter to mid spring panicle of rose red flowers are light and airy- followed by green fruit. This is an ideal groundcover shrub under native Oaks.  It also makes an almost formal ground cover in landscapes . Found specifically on Santa Catalina in the Channel Islands off of southern CA. There it grows with other Channel island endemics. Tolerates full sun in our climate but its home is beneath the canopy. Water for the first year to establish then none in subsequent years. Not bothered by deer- unsure of rabbits. Prune it if needed after blooming. Blooms on wood from the previous year.  Excellent combined with Vancouveria chrysantha and Camas liechtlinii. for a culture and climate adapted grouping.  Grows very fast when happy.

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Ribes x gordonianum

One of the most spectacular of the flowering currants. This hybrid between the yellow eastern Ribes odoratum and our locally native  pink flowered western Ribes sanguineum splits the good looks with chains of coral orange flowers with a faint yellow center. Salmon up close the color reads as orange from farther away. Blooms March/April for weeks on a large spreading shrub for part shade and rich, well drained soil. Consistent summer moisture- do not let it dry completely nor should it ever be soggy. Extremely cold hardy with orange/yellow fall color. To 8′ x 8′ in 8 years. Blooms on wood from the previous year- prune AFTER flowering if needed.

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Rosa ‘Betty Prior’

With all the knock out, fleurshrubselekt® and every other patented type of rose its reassuring that this old gal still rocks them all. Betty bears clusters of slightly fragrant large single pink flowers. They are light pink w/ a slightly darker sheen to the surface of the petals which almost always open skyward. These upright facing groups of flowers yield not only a lot of color- it blooms constantly from May to frost, it gives the plant a wild appeal not seen in overly bred shrubs. The disease resistant foliage is mid green and handsome as well. To 8′ x 4′ forming a tall bloomy shrub. left unpruned it makes a great climbing rose and will unobtrusively scale small trees, deck railings. It may be hard pruned in early spring if necessary. Remove spent flowers and more will quickly appear. Tough plant that gets by on a less than perfect watering regime.  Regular, deep watering (once a week max) will yield great performance. Established plants can take drought at the expense of re-blooming. Very easy to grow charming rose. Ultra cold hardy.

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Rosa ‘Darlow’s Enigma’

Curious climbing rose that puts on a non-stop display of sprays of intensely fragrant flowers that are diminutive, white, and semi-double. The anise/fruit scented flowers begin in mid-spring and continue unabated until autumn. A large growing rose to 12′ tall and 8′ wide in time. Excellent trained on a trellis or pergola. Blooms on wood from the current season and may be hard pruned in early spring. This rose seedling was discovered in a garden in Eugene and its popularity has spread throughout the globe. The sweet fragrance will perfume an entire garden on a warm summer day. Captivating cut flower. Disease resistant and very tough rose that gets by on a minimum amount of summer water and still blooms. Regular water in rich soil amplifies this roses performance dramatically. Winter deciduous. Extremely cold hardy. On its own roots.

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This has become a famous  favorite floribunda rose of gardeners all over. It does especially well in our climate and even endures and blooms in considerable shade. The very full  double flowers are 4.5″ across. They begin as buds that are colored distinctly brown, as the flower unfurls it changes to more of a parchment color then to lavender and finally silver white. It has a  moderate sweet fragrance and it re-blooms continuously and heavily until frost. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Disease resistant foliage on an upright vase shaped shrub to  3” x 3′ wide. Rapid and heavy re-bloom provides cut material all summer into autumn. This old fashioned faded flower color is brilliant with other more solidly colored double roses of pink or orange. The pointed buds are formed on long stems. Rich soil with regular summer water for the fastest re-bloom.  Prune hard AFTER PRESIDENTS DAY ( about FEB 20th). Prune off  everything with a diameter smaller than a pencil. Very easy forgiving rose that makes all others look fantastic. I would never be with out this charming, bloomy excellent rose. A floribunda rose that is prolific but whose flowers are much more like a  hybrid tea. Appreciates three applications of a handful of organic rose food + a handful of Alfalfa meal around the base per season. On its own roots. Wonderful multicolor morphing magic rose.

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