Kadsura japonica ‘Fukurin’

Elegant, sophisticated evergreen vine with large leaves margined in cream. Contrast with the cinnamon colored twining stems is striking as well. A close magnolia relative that display small pendant white magnolia-like flowers in July-Sept. vigorous easy to grow vine for a large pergola or fence. Twines strongly. Provide support. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. Best in rich soil with regular summer water. To 12′ tall in 5 years. Excellent on a trellis. Good looking year round. Easy to grow. Seems to prefer having its feet in the shade and the top in the sun. May become semi-deciduous in the coldest winters (below 10ºF). Re-leafs quickly in spring. Red berries often follow the small flowers. Japan.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lonicera ciliosa

PNW Orange Honeysuckle is one of our most showy native vines. Our region is sparse on native vines so this pretty plant is welcome. In late spring to summer clusters of brilliant orange tubular flowers decorate the branch tips. Loved by hummingbirds as well as other birds which is obvious, its also important for all native pollinators. The flowers change to brilliant red fruit which is consumed  by wildlife and seldom lingers.  Deciduous mid green foliage is verdant all through the season. As with the vast majority of Honeysuckle vines this plant nearly always goes leafless at the base. Expect this and plan for it. Strongly twining plant to 12′ tall and almost as wide. Provide strong support. Light consistent summer water to establish then very little necessary once established. (Also accepts regular summer H20). Excellent vine for country fences, decorating mailboxes etc. Protect from deer, otherwise it is pest and disease resistant- occasional mildew in the autumn is virtually harmless – great news for a honeysuckle. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed after flowering. This vine can be very hard to find. We grow it from seed and quantities are limited.  Oregon native plant

Not available 2022/23

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: , ,
Biome: , , , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn5b -10º to -15ºF
 |  Foliage season:


Lonicera hispidula

Hairy Honeysuckle or wild pink honeysuckle is a common vine in the western part of our state. Ranging rom S. British Columbia to California. This sprawling and twining plant is most associated with the cover under white oak woodlands. This vine can crawl to impressive heights into trees. As a child near Eugene this grew extensively on our property. It would climb pole sized trees and I would strip the winding canes off the trees and use them as a trellis for annual vines. The strong wood lasted 10 years or more. It derives its name from the conspicuous hairs on the leaves. At terminal ends of the branches soft pink curly flowers appear in cymes from June to September. These are followed by brilliant red berries that are food for birds. It has no fragrance. Excellent plant for stabilizing banks and hillsides where its incredible tenacity and drought tolerance is an advantage. Never a tidy plant this vine can be sent up a trellis or large tree. Water to establish then set it free. This honeysuckle can be afflicted with aphids early in the season but I’ve never seen it actually inhibit the plant. Just make sure not to look to closely at the plant in May-June. Evergreen to semi-evergreen with round leaves that surrounding the stem nearest the ends just before the flowers appear. Best in wild areas.- for some it can lack the sophistication of our other native honeysuckle Lonicera ciliosa. and is not as immediately beautiful. In habitat it consorts with Oregon White Oak (Quercus garryana) Poison Oak (Toxicodendron diversifolia) and Creeping snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus). Often found clambering up steep rocky slopes in dry woods. Oregon native plant.

My Favorites

Plant type: ,  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn5b -10º to -15ºFZn6a -5º to -10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Lonicera x americana

A hybrid between two european species has yielded one of the best climbing honeysuckles we can grow. Less prone to pests and disease this prolific blooming vine produces huge trusses of pink/yellow/cream highly fragrant flowers from late spring to autumn. A non-twining semi-evergreen vine that requires the support of something in which the canes can interweave and be supported. Often bare at the base- plan for this. To 12′ tall and as wide. Massive initial display of flowers in late spring and then sporadically until Sept. Full sun to light shade and regular summer water to increase vigor, spur re-bloom. The fragrance is not sweet and cloying rather a complex blend of cloves, cologne and petunia. It carries for quite a distance. A good sized specimen will perfume the entire block.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn5a -15º to -20ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Chilean Jasmine is not common in our region but it has been grown for many decades and it does well in warmer gardens, protected places. Large entire deep green leaves are 3″ long and  opposite on twining stems. This strongly growing vine requires heavy and reliable support (See #4 copper wire). Blooms on new growth, which is continuous, In rich soil it can achieve 15′ in a season. The 2″ long tubular white flowers have the familiar propeller petal configuration of this family the Apocynaceae . The fragrance to me is delicious on warm days and nights and close to the blossoms which appear in clusters. It is not a sweetly cloying scent but more sophisticated. I once had this vine around my front door. In full bloom on warm summer nights it would be a cloud of perfume. Deciduous and often freezes back either 1/2- 3/4 of the way in colder than normal winters. In horrendous winters (below 12ºF) it can freeze away. Choose a protected site in full sun with rich soil and ample water. The more verdant the growth the more profuse the display and fragrance. Blooms late May- October. Avoid, cold frosty sites, cold gardens. In rural areas place it against  south facing wall. Because it blooms on new wood and grows so prolifically it may be cut nearly to the ground for a fresh start to the year- do this in late March.  In most summers large two chamber connected bean pods are 8″ long and bright green. When they ripen to tan they will twist and release downy clad black seeds that sail on the wind. Several winters in a row and the seeds that germinate may survive. I almost always lose them but the climate is changing and don’t bet on self sowing any way -its rare  Root hardy to about 5ºF- mulch for added protection. Exquisite vine. Native to central southern Chile.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Passaflora caerulea ‘Becky’s Blue & White’

Blue crown passion vine is an incredibly popular if huge vine in our climate. This form has the typical 3″ intricate flowers with the tinker toy center but the filaments that encircle the middle are deeper blue w/ a contrasting zone of brighter white. The result is bolder coloration and contrast. Rampant evergreen vine to about 13ºF . The vine is root hardy to about 0ºF- especially when established.  Give this big vine room and proper support. To 18′ tall and wide very quickly in average, well drained soil. Evergreen lobed leaves are glossy and this vine blooms profusely on new growth. The more it grows the more it blooms. Winding tendrils assist its climb and will adhere to anything with a diameter smaller than a regular sharpie pen. This includes screen…and if it is too close to a house and they attach to the screen….bad scene getting them off. Otherwise provide a trellis or pergola that can accommodate its size. Flowers appear from May-Frost. It may be cut back very hard in spring to refresh, supply new blooming wood, or just to restrain. Overly rich soil leads to rampant growth and less flowering. So, average soil that drains is ideal. Flowers often transform into golf ball sized orbs that are sweet tasting but not really food. Established passion vines will often sucker quite a way from the parent plant. Plant for this and be vigilant. There is no vine, however so magical in flower form that it transfixes people and is a special joy for children. Little water once established. Deer resistant. Mountains of Brazil.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Passaflora caerulea ‘Snow Queen’

Ravishing pure white intricate flowers flow from this passion vine, which can be rambunctious in the wrong place. Large growing plant to 20′ (long) tall and attaching itself  firmly by tendrils. Full sun in average soil with a lot of water to establish. Once established it is on its own. Too much irrigation and soil that is too rich leads to prodigious growth that can get rank and lack bloom. So, don’t starve it, just put it in reasonably good soil, that you have double dug. Water faithfully to spur growth. Semi-deciduous to evergreen in our climate.In winters below 15ºF and depending on the length of cold it can be totally deciduous. Good performance on the Oregon coast.  5″ wide flowers have a light sweet fragrance. Moderate deer resistance- it can also climb out of reach. Wonderful white passion vine.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure: ,
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7a 5º to 0ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Stellar passion vine with distinctly purple tepals and deep black to blue on the interior of the flower. Vigorous vine for a protected location in full sun. To 12′ in a season and blooming continuously from June to October. Attaches itself by winding tendrils. The flowers appear on new wood, as the vine grows it produces new flowers.  Average to rich soil with REGULAR irrigation during the first season and then occasionally. Passafloras must be well established going into their first winter. In half of the winters (below 20ºF) it can freeze to the ground. It will then rapidly break from the base when truly warm weather arrives.  Mulch heavily the first winter, Place on a trellis against  warm, sunny wall for the best performance. The intricate and beautiful flowers are about 4″ across. Sometimes sets inedible fruit. Passion vines are loved by everybody but especially children. The toy-like flowers enchant everybody. Sweetly fragrant flowers up close. Loved by hummingbirds.  One of the best hybrid Pnassafloras for our gardens. Moderate deer resistance

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: ,


Passaflora x caerulea ‘Damsel’s Delight’ ®

Fantastic new hybrid Passion vine with impressively huge, spectacular flowers and a more restrained habit. 4″ wide brilliantly colored flowers feature deep blue and purple and white alternating stripes on the row of filaments that encircle the center. The sepals- petal like structure surrounding the flower alternated between white and lavender. To only 8′ tall in a season and remaining compact for all of its life. Happy evergreen vine that climbs by tendrils.- provide support. Small enough to find a long happy life in containers. Rich, well drained soil in full sun and a warm position. Evergreen to about 15ºF- the vast majority of winters. This passion vine has the largest flowers by far of any cold hardy selection. Truly beautiful and impressive. Flowers emit a light sweet scent and we have yet to see fruit produced. Loved by children and adults as well as the occasional butterfly. Blooms on the current seasons growth. Prune whenever you feel like its necessary- rare for this compact and easy vine.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn7b 10º to 5ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season:


Passiflora x ‘Star of Surbiton’

We’ve tried a lot of Passion Vines and to be honest the majority of hardy varieties are just basically a variation on that old house eating vine ‘Blue Crown Passion’ Vine (Passaflora caeulea). This guy is a surprise though. While it can freeze to the ground below about 20ºF it is evergreen in the majority of normal winters and its an early and heavy blooming vine- that is pretty as well. The white sepals surround a row of light purple filaments. Very delicate and intricate flower that we adore. Plant in a hot sunny aspect with support for its little tough twiners to adhere. And they will as the whole plant rises to 12′ tall in a single season. Blooms on new growth- as its growing it is constantly blooming. Loved my hummers, butterflies, pollinators in general. Mulch the base going into the first winter. Once it is established no arctic blast will affect the roots. Fast re-growth in in spring. Rich, well drained soil with regular summer water to speed growth. Flowers are approximately 4″ wide and very showy. Not a vine for cool shady gardens or arctic cold spaces.

My Favorites

Plant type:  |  Sun exposure:
Biome: , ,  |  USDA Hardiness zone: Zn8a 15º to 10ºF
Foliage color:  |  Foliage season: