Hall’s Aster might as well be known as Willamette Valley Aster as this charming smaller perennial is found primarily there. To 20″ tall and spreading to form a wider clump this native aster begins blooming in August and continues into Autumn. The small daisy flowers have rays that are primarily white, though light pink and lavender are also seen. The reverse of the petals is always a darker color- primarily very light lavender. Excellent native pollinator plant for late in the season. Full sun to very light shade in rich to average soil. Adaptable to xeric clay soils that dry in summer. In the garden deep infrequent soaks will yield the healthiest and most floriferous plants. Spreads moderately underground by stolons. Not bothered by deer. Nice little cut flower as filler for bolder arrangements. Climate adapted perennial that is a native for a Willamette Valley prairie. Not as vigorous and space consuming as Symphyotrichum subspicatum – Douglas aster. Hall’s aster fits in much smaller spaces. Easy to grow, winter deciduous. Associated plants in the wild are Sidalcea m. ‘Virgata’, Eriophyllum lanatum, Achillea millefolium.  Takes intense dry conditions with establishment. Oregon native plant.

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This short lived, very showy perennial is tough as nails. This strain enchants with huge flowers that are almost always single but come in tones from black to yellow, brown, orange, and red.. They immediately remind me of a blanket made by native Americans.  To 28″ tall ( compact ) with enormous flowers up to 5″ across. They come in a profusion from mid summer to early autumn. This strain has a natural life span of 3-5 years – but it does re-sow itself in open and opportune places. Open  soil that has been slightly enriched with compost / fertilizer. Full sun and regular water until fall rains take over. Mix with other sunset orange/ brown toned flowers. I pick the searing true red of Salvia ‘Royal Bumble’ as sell as the soft green spikes of Kniphofia pumila both will bloom simultaneously  with the Rudbeckia Excellent in summer containers and beloved for its long bloom time. Remove spent flowers for the first few rounds to encourage more bloom. leave the last round  to be pollinated and set seed. Excellent pollinator perennial. Regular water for the first season , less the following year. Some deer resistance.

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Pacific Aster. Our selection of a widespread beach aster species that circles much of the temperate Pacific Rim. This form tops out at a compact 30″ on an upright plant that forms expanding clumps in rich to average soil ‘Short Sands’ is a purple form from seed of a very dark purple specimen that Greg found.  It is by far the darkest purple that we have encountered in this species. The majority are white to very light lavender. Most often its habitat is adjacent or very near the coastal strand. Its adapted to all kinds of soils from sand to clay and it appreciates deep infrequent water during the summer season. Blooms begin in August and open until mid November. This aster is often seen along the sides of HWY 101. In fleeting glimpse you can capture small periwinkle daisies late in the season. A pollinator master piece. All sorts of natives recognize this showy perennial. Full sun to light shade. It seems to be most vertical in full sun and average soil. Over amended soils, too much water, or too much shade will lead to a splaying flop. The flat upturned daisies come in rows of two for a fuller look and are a natural landing pad for butterflies.  Winter deciduous, very tolerant of dry conditions when established but does better with deep infrequent summer drinks. Cut back hard in spring- a new batch of leaves will just be arriving. This sophisticated  native is at home in pampered borders or wild areas. Associated plants in habitat are Mianthemum dilitatum, Calamagrostis nutkensis, and Vaccinium ovatum. Its habitat is dwindling as Everlasting Pea (Lathyrus latifolius) and Ox Eye Daisy (Dendranthema) have crowded this special plant out  Excellent garden plant.  Oregon native plant

Xera Plants Introduction

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This is an exciting new form of the butterfly glad, which we lovingly refer to as Gladzilla. So far, this cultivar is not nearly as rambunctious but is vigorous. Forming large colonies by bulb offsets as well as seed. Gray/green foliage rises to 16″ in clumps. In  mid summer a large display of Ruby pink flowers appear in staggered stems up to 24″. If left to its on devices and just watered a good clump can yield more than a dozen stems. It makes a fantastic cut flower and unopened buds will be forced open in the vase. Full sun and AVERAGE soil with REGULAR water for the first season then light irrigation in subsequent years.It is vigorous enough that you can rely on water alone to check its growth. Very easy to grow cold hardy perennial Gladiolus. Very long lived. Mixes well with other vigorous perennials for full sun and regular water. Not bothered by deer or pests. To 2′ wide as a clump. Winter deciduous. South Africa.

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Echinaceas have been bred, crossed and pretty much turned into mums. There is no doubt that the straight species and those closest to  it are the easiest and longest lived plants. This seed strain of Echinacea purpurea displays all the best traits of the species, Large deep rose reflexed petals around an orange/brown fragrant cone. Echinacea in our climate requires regular irrigation for the first two years to establish. Its critically important in the first year. Full sun and rich soil that drains with regular irrigation. Wonderful border perennial and even cut flower. Blooms late June to late August The spent flowers may be left to feed overwintering birds, the stems turn deep black and are  handsome as well. I’ve had excellent luck adding a handful of all organic fertilizer (dry) to the hole before planting. This helps the plant establish faster and in time it will require much less water. To 3′ tall and forming an enlarging clump. Moderate deer resistance. Native to the plains/midwest US. Fragrant. ( We don’t grow any double Echinacea because they are worthless to pollinators.)

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Beach fleabane or beach daisy normally runs in a mauve, to periwinkle vein. This lovely selection turns it up with crystal white daisies and a bold yellow center.  Long lived perennial that is very adaptable. To 6″ tall a happy clump will spread to 2′ wide or more. Low and spreading it displays the flowers upright in a mass. This beckons pollinates and they always find this easy going daisy. Full sun, rich to average soil with regular irrigation through the bloom period. This not only keeps the plant verdant it encourage re-bloom which can occur until September. The initial huge show of flowers begins in late May into July. Excellent perennial for the top of a wall where it will happily creep over the edge and follow the contours on the way down. It may be cut back hard after the initial large flush of flowers, this tidies the plant and sets the stage for another big show. Not bothered by deer and often left alone by rabbits. This daisy is most conspicuous in habitat on the cliffs adjacent to the beach. It also perches on sea stacks. Beach fleabane ranges from the Northern Oregon coast south all along the California coast. Mix with other Erigeron glaucus cultivars for depth of contrast- this is when all the flower colors look the most distinct. Very easy to grow and it also absorbs the heat of parking strips with no issues. Cold hardy. Oregon native plant

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Eccremocarpus scaber ‘Orange’

Chilean glory vine comes in a host of flower colors. We’ve endeavored to sell them by that category. This orange variety is both a vivid color and the most common for this short lived vine. To 8′ in a season- or taller this light textured vine attaches itself by tendrils. Provide fine support such as a mesh or small diameter trellis. Bloom is on new growth and continues all season. After flowering chain of swollen seed pods  appear- leave some on the plant to ripen as this plant will also self sow and the main plant will live for only 3-5 years so you want a replacement. Loved by pollinators but naturally adapted to hummingbirds. Full sun and rich, well drained soil in a protected location. This is a great vine textured, light vine for fence, even chicken coops. Dies back to the ground in normal to colder than normal winters, returns from the base in spring. Lovely vine. Mulch in autumn to protect the base.  Chile

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Wonderful new Dianthus that enchants us with large single flowers of intricate coloring. One inch wide flowers have a pinked edge and the interior of the fragrant flower is a ring of darker pink. On either side of the ring a zone of coral on the center with a ring of very light pink on the exterior- see complex. The clove scented flowers appear from April-July and are showy for weeks. Excellent cut flower that produces long stems and is ideal for bouquets. To 1′ x 1′ forming a slowly spreading evergreen clump. Not bothered by pests or disease. If Dianthus are shy to bloom in our climate a handful of lime in winter is all thats needed. Regular water though bloom time then less required. Excellent combined with other smaller perennials. Enchanting with the chalk pink simultaneous flowers of Aethionema Shrubby rock cress. Evergreen. Flowers are edible and are sweet with a hint of the fragrance. Beautiful Dianthus. Long lived perennial.

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Abutilon ‘Nabob’

Odd name for a wonderful flowering maple. This Abutilon has earned its fame with large deep red/black red pendant flowers for months on end. In one season it will form a substantial sub-shrub and bloom continuously as it grows.  Rounded habit to 4’x 3′. Its best home is in containers where you can inspect the intensity of the flower color up close. Each globe shaped flower is 1 1/2″ wide and they occur in a huge display for months. Loved by hummingbirds and pollinators as well. Rich soil with regular irrigation. In spring if the winter has been normal to mild it will often resprout from the base when warm weather returns. Mulch in autumn to protect the base. The early spring appearance is pretty awful the solution  is to water, water, water, and add a 1/2 cup of all purpose organic fertilizer. Recovery is rapid as the weather warms. If in a mobile container it may be moved into an unheated garage and watered once a month through winter. Bring out, fertilize and water when all threat of frost has passed. Classic flowering maple.

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Spreading Dogbane is a pretty semi-shrubby native perennial that is found in every biome in our area. David Douglas mentioned this billowing perennial with clouds of light pink/white bells. Mostly he hated tripping over it in the Willamette Valley. This very permanent plant spreads to form big drifts in the wild. Streambanks, prairies, alpine meadows it can appear. The rounded downward pointing leaves emerge on semi-woody stems. In June-August clouds of flowers appear for weeks. Loved by pollinators and birds specifically attractive to native hummingbirds and butterflies. To 2′ tall and spreading by stolons to a wide area. Water to establish then none in subsequent years. Mulch after planting. Virtually any somewhat rich soil type including amended sand. Full sun to part shade. Wonderful plant and floral texture for meadows. I have great childhood memories of this plant in July in full bloom perched with our huge native black bumble bees. Very convenient bloom time- it begins to bloom just as most other natives are finished.  Dogbane is toxic when consumed by humans or animals- hence the common name. When stems are broken a milky sap is exuded. Moderate deer resistance.  Distantly related to milkweed. Once very common in the Willamette Valley its territory has shrunk. Great performance in hellstrips and verges that are lightly or completely non-irrigated. Give this plant room to spread and plan ahead. Limited availability. Oregon native plant

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