We love this cold hardy species also known as mountain bottlebrush. This is our selection of a dwarf form and it achieves a very dense, compact habit at just 2′ tall by 3′ wide in 7 years. In May/June 1″ acid green bottlebrush flowers illuminate the tips of the branches. Pollinated by birds in nature it is a beacon to our local hummingbirds as well. Following the flowers rows of button shaped seed pods become woody and add to the shrubs interest. Full sun and rich to average soil with light consistent summer water for the first few years. It can tolerate regular irrigation but is summer drought tolerant when established. A great plant for foundations, rock gardens, hell strips. The pointed forest green foliage takes on maroon tints in the coldest weather. Cold hardy to 5ºF. Moderately deer resistant.

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Lomatium utriculatum

Spring Gold or Biscuitroot is a widespread spring perennial from British Columbia south into northern California. In our area it occupies steep slopes and delights in mid-late spring with complex umbels of brilliant gold/yellow flowers. This tap rooted plant requires regular water for the first season- but never boggy, In enriched to average well drained soil. Excellent performance on slopes. Over time the rosette increases in width and spring flowers. An important native pollinator plant that was also used by native Americans as a food source. To 6″ tall in bloom a plant will achieve 2′ wide in half a dozen years. Strongly resents disturbance and a happy plant will live for decades. Not bothered by pests. Once native in the Portland area, its original range in W. Oregon has been substantially diminished. Great companion plant with Manzanita. Moderately deer resistant. Winter deciduous. Oregon Native Plant

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PNW Orange Honeysuckle is one of our most showy native vines. Our region is sparse on native vines so this pretty plant is welcome. In late spring to summer clusters of brilliant orange tubular flowers decorate the branch tips. Loved by hummingbirds as well as other birds which is obvious, its also important for all native pollinators. The flowers change to brilliant red fruit which is consumed  by wildlife and seldom lingers.  Deciduous mid green foliage is verdant all through the season. As with the vast majority of Honeysuckle vines this plant nearly always goes leafless at the base. Expect this and plan for it. Strongly twining plant to 12′ tall and almost as wide. Provide strong support. Light consistent summer water to establish then very little necessary once established. (Also accepts regular summer H20). Excellent vine for country fences, decorating mailboxes etc. Protect from deer, otherwise it is pest and disease resistant – great news for a honeysuckle. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed after flowering.  Oregon Native Plant

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Coast gooseberry or black gooseberry is an intricately branched native deciduous shrub that is incredibly important to wildlife as well as pollinators. Mounding and spreading with fine and prickly needles housed at each node. The maple shaped leaves have a fine skunk aroma up close. To 4′ x 6′ in the extreme this moderately fast growing plant is best in full sun but can handle quite a bit of shade-especially deciduous shade. This species is never common and its found mainly west of the Cascades The small pendulous flower feature red petals surrounding a white corolla. These morph into prickly sour fruits whose final color ripens to black. Fall color is soft yellow to orange and brief. Light consistent summer water in a average to enriched, well drained soil. The berries are edible but intensely sour and make fine food for a wide range of cool birds. Native to the Portland city limits. Excellent shrub for remediation of wild sites. This pretty shrub makes a great transitional plant for wild areas and has a wild look itself. Blooms on wood from the previous season. Prune if needed AFTER flowering.      Oregon Native Plant

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Mules Ears are our native sunflowers. These cheery bold perennials make the transition of our wild flowers from spring into real summer. So named for its long leaves it forms very permanent spreading colonies in clay soils in habitat. The brilliant yellow sun flower blossoms rise up on sturdy stems directly from the ground. Each ebullient large flower is about 4″ across. Blooms appear from late April to early June. This plant usually finishes blooming just as summer drought commences. Its a memorable sight in wild meadows where it blooms simultaneously with native Rosa nutkana and Farewell to spring (Clarkia amoena var. lindleyi) and Giant blue eyed mary (Collinsia grandiflora). Wonderful cut flower and immediate and popular pollinator perennial. This plant was once very common in the Willamette Valley but civilization has immensely shrunk its native range. Good, long lived garden plant that goes summer dormant quickly after blooming has ended. The leaves turn gray and brittle and can easily be removed then. Give it a summer rest w/ little to no summer water once established. Full sun to very light shade. Water to establish its first season then none in subsequent years. Fun to grow and LONG lived. To 14″ in bloom forming a plant several feet across. Moderate deer resistance. Native to the Portland city limits.  Oregon native plant

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Argyrocytisus battandieri

Moroccan Pineapple Broom is a splendid, hardy NON-INVASIVE tree  that we adore for its silver foliage and spicily scented cones of brilliant yellow flowers. Fast growing tree which may also be maintained as a shrub. In our climate with more rain than its native range it usually achieves tree like proportions. To 16′ tall by 10′ wide most often with one to three trunks. Best in poor to average soil with as little irrigation as possible once established. You must treat this plant with a bit of benign neglect. Overly enriched soil and too much supplemental irrigation leads to a rank growing and usually unstable plant that can go over easily in a wet gale. The flower fragrance is definitely pineapple with somewhat salty notes. Blooms appear May-July and are born on wood from the previous year. Prune-if needed AFTER flowering has ended. Full sun is ideal. Wonderful small tree for rough sites- compacted awful droughty soils. Almost always deciduous in our winters and surprisingly hardy taking temperatures just below 0ºF with no ill effects. Moderately deer resistance. Absorbs the blasting heat of south facing walls. Wonderful small tree. Beautiful espalier subject- see pruning above.

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Prunella vulgaris var. lanceolata

When you’ve given up all hope, When you think nothing will grow there enter this rugged, pioneering native to the rescue. Infamous for its weedy introduction have you ever had a close look at our own NATIVE populations? They yield truly showy flowers that are large cones with relatively large velvet purple flowers protruding. They make a great cut flower too. Found from the arctic to the tropics on North America. This form is genetically native stock. Full sun to quite a bit of shade in virtually any soil. Not as rambunctious as you would think but not a shrinking plant either. Very wild appearance and we like it. One of the first wildflowers that I recognized as a child, and when I was introduced much later to the weedy type I was sorely disappointed. Responds to regular water by blooming continuously. Reacts to withering drought by becoming limp and sometimes crisps. It always comes back. Mostly evergreen in our climate. To 6″ tall in bloom otherwise prostrate. Bees adore this plant. Aka Lanceleaf Selfheal. A good native weed. Oregon Native Plant.

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This beautiful, deep sky blue flowered rosemary we found planted at a 100 year old farmhouse in Milwauke, OR. The flowers are scintillating and this plant- installed in the early 1980’s, has proven longevity as well. To 3′ tall by 5′ wide eventually. Blooms appear unabated from autumn to summer. Vigorous evergreen shrub with an upright and then spreading habit. Full sun and no water necessary once established. It can take light, regular water in summer as well. Otherwise, it thrives on only what fall from the sky. A very showy winter blooming shrub for hot locations, south facing hillsides, adjacent to walls, asphalt anywhere another less heat durable plant would fry. Moderate deer resistance. Pungently aromatic and great for culinary use. Prune- if needed, in late spring following bloom. Blooms on wood from the previous season. This variety would make an admirable upright, clipped hedge. Named by and for our friend Carol. Thanks Carol.

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Epilobium (Zauschneria ) ‘Solidarity Pink’

If shocking vermillion, red, and orange are a bit too vibrant for you enter this softly hued selection. Soft pink tubular flowers appear constantly from early August to October. Low spreading perennial to 8″ tall by 2′ wide in a short time. The very light green foliage is clad in soft hairs giving the whole plant a soft mien. Full sun and rich to average well drained soil is ideal. Slopes, rock gardens, walls, hellstrips all are appropriate for this low water plant. Water diligently to establish but never boggy. In subsequent years only light water on occasion is required. Spreads laterally underground by stolons. Long lived perennial if sited and somewhat cared for. Completely winter deciduous- cut away the previous years dead growth in February. Somewhat deer resistant. Mix with other late blooming perennial. Wonderful combined with Cuphea hirtella and the soft yellow flowers of Erodium chrysanthemum.  West coast native plant that calls to hummingbirds far and wide. Takes blasting hot conditions in stride.

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Erodium ‘Pickering Pink’

‘Pickering Pink’ Cranesbill. The name sounds like it will have an all pink flower. Not really. The simple five petalled flowers have two petals that are pink on top with a distinct black blotch. The two lower petals are soft pink almost white. This contrast of colors gives this small plant extra impact as well as a fun wild flower appeal. It forms a tight mound of soft, divided foliage to 3″ tall by 10″ wide. The cheery flowers are born on 6″ wiry stems. Blooms appear continuously from mid-spring to frost. Erodiums bloom and bloom with little intervention from the gardener. They also excel in the rough life of hellstrips. In borders, rock gardens, containers, even small meadow gardens this European native is excellently adapted to our climate. Light summer water increases the flower display and spent flowers can be snipped to not only spur more but to achieve a tidier look. Evergreen foliage and low stature also make it appropriate between pavers. Some deer resistance as well as rabbit resistance.  Very easy to grow.  Full sun.

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