Chilean Hazlenut is not a hazelnut at all its a protea. Glossy pinnate leaves are handsome all the time on this evergreen tree. The huge leaves hug the curly ivory colored flowers that stick out perpendicular to the stems. They are about 3″ long. After fertilization these flowers morph into tasty mellow nut like fruits that resemble red/ochre berries.. They are somewhat like Hazelnuts hence the name. Moderately fast growing to 25′ in our climate. It requires a protected location away from subfreezing wind. Excellent on the Oregon coast. The bark is mellow brown and handsome. It can freeze back substantially at 10ºF but recovery in spring is rapid.  This means that this forest tree is almost always a shrub in our climate. Excellent espaliered against a south or west facing wall. Takes some shade but is happier in full sun. Fairly closely related to Macadamias but the nuts aren’t quite as sophisticated. Establish this plant well going into the first winter. Water once a week deeply for the first year. Good container plant that can be moved to a protected location when arctic air threatens. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed after flowering has ended.Prefers acidic soil and do not fertilize with phosphorous or potassium. Proteaceae. Chile/Peru/Argentina

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This is a delightfully airy evergreen whose variegation definitely enhances the over all look.  A moderately fast growing shrub to 6′ x 3′ in 7  years. Very hardy to cold enduring temperatures near 0ºF with little issues. In spring spidery star shaped cream flowers appear in every branch end. Part shade to high overhead shade but it also does not burn in full sun in our climate, Just make sure that you water it regularly. Established shrubs get by with very little. Aromatic foliage is not palatable to animals and this is a very good bet where deer are a problem. Great shrub for brightening garden corners or lightening up dark shade. Rich to average soil. aka Chinese anise shrub. The flowers have a light odd scent. Not worth repeating and its only pungent up close. Seed pods that form become woody and star shaped,- aka Star Anise. Distinctive upright dense habit. Prune if needed AFTER flowring has ended.

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Bog deer vetch is a beautiful native perennial found in wet to seasonally wet sites throughout Oregon, but primarily Western Oregon. This rhizomatous perennial erupts from the ground in early spring with pinnate leaves that are deep purple. As the plant extends it changes to dark green and begins to bloom in crowns of pea flowers that are yellow and white. Very pretty. The symmetry of the flowers is especially attractive. To 2′ tall x 3′ wide.  Blooms April to June. Lovely native perennial for boggy sites. Amenable to average culture in  rich soil with regular H20 in summer. Easy to grow long lived perennial for meadows,  swales, vernally wet sites.  Excellent perennial for a rain garden. Takes dry conditions when established and goes deciduous with summer heat.  Competes well with invasive grasses. Possibly deer resistant. Often seen along streams in NW Oregon. Riparian perennial. Oregon native plant.

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Catalina perfume is the common name for this lovely, tough evergreen currant from Southern California. The round evergreen leaves which do remind one of a Viburnum are resinous and spicily fragrant, especially on warm days. To 3′ tall and spreading about 6′ -this low shrub is best adapted to part shade and little to no summer water. It is incredibly drought adapted. In late winter to mid spring panicle of rose red flowers are light and airy- followed by green fruit. This is an ideal groundcover shrub under native Oaks.  It also makes an almost formal ground cover in landscapes . Found specifically on Santa Catalina in the Channel Islands off of southern CA. There it grows with other Channel island endemics. Tolerates full sun in our climate but its home is beneath the canopy. Water for the first year to establish then none in subsequent years. Not bothered by deer- unsure of rabbits. Prune it if needed after blooming. Blooms on wood from the previous year.  Excellent combined with Vancouveria chrysantha and Camas liechtlinii. for a culture and climate adapted grouping.  Grows very fast when happy.

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This has become a famous  favorite floribunda rose of gardeners all over. It does especially well in our climate and even endures and blooms in considerable shade. The very full  double flowers are 4.5″ across. They begin as buds that are colored distinctly brown, as the flower unfurls it changes to more of a parchment color then to lavender and finally silver white. It has a  moderate sweet fragrance and it re-blooms continuously and heavily until frost. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Disease resistant foliage on an upright vase shaped shrub to  3” x 3′ wide. Rapid and heavy re-bloom provides cut material all summer into autumn. This old fashioned faded flower color is brilliant with other more solidly colored double roses of pink or orange. The pointed buds are formed on long stems. Rich soil with regular summer water for the fastest re-bloom.  Prune hard AFTER PRESIDENTS DAY ( about FEB 20th). Prune off  everything with a diameter smaller than a pencil. Very easy forgiving rose that makes all others look fantastic. I would never be with out this charming, bloomy excellent rose. A floribunda rose that is prolific but whose flowers are much more like a  hybrid tea. Appreciates three applications of a handful of organic rose food + a handful of Alfalfa meal around the base per season. On its own roots. Wonderful multicolor morphing magic rose.

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Not all Sasanqua Camellias are created equally and though they all bloom in autumn to winter some have much studier flowers that are beautiful as well. ‘Kanjiro’ is an ancient Japanese cultivar and to this day it is still one of the finest. The large double dark pink flowers are exceptionally weather tolerant and will even survive freezes into the upper 20’s. Even if flowers are spoiled by frost a seemingly never ending supply of buds replaces the flowers quickly, in fact a this is a natural phenomenon for this shrub. You often get  your best displays right after a freeze when the thaw begins. Otherwise its a non stop procession of flowers from October to December. Large growing evergreen shrub with very handsome dark foliage that is good looking year round. To 10′ tall x 10′ wide in 12 years, it  may be pruned to a much smaller size or espaliered on a wall which will  protect the flowers from the vagaries of weather. Moderately fast growing with regular summer water in full hot sun. Established shrubs are very tolerant of summer drought. Long lived. There is a light earthy fragrance to the flowers. Long long season of bloom. Very nice with Grevillea x ‘Leanne’ for a prolific blooming winter display.

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This exceptional form of hairy manzanita we discovered on the north side of Mount Hood. The large foliage is distinctively blue and is held perpendicular to the stems. In very late winter to early spring pearl pink/white flowers decorate the branch tips and appeal to both hummingbirds and native bees. A large rounded shrub to 6′ x 8′ forming a wide dome. Its best attribute is its distinctive deep mahogany glossy bark which  contrasts with the blue foliage. Russet berries follow the flowers and are consumed by wildlife. Full sun to very high overhead shade in average to poor unimproved soil. Water once a week to establish, when new growth begins taper off then drought adaptation is exceptional. Its also exceptionally hardy to cold to at least -15ºF and is as happy in the Willamette Valley as Central Oregon. Moderately fast growing. Disease resistant, Best to grow Arctostaphylos columbiana as lean as possible. Give it just enough water to establish and then only bark/chip mulch.  A very pretty cultivar that is one of our favorite manzanitas. Oregon native plant

Xera Plants Introduction

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We’re intent on expanding our offerings of our cold hardy native Hairy Manzanita. This form we found in the Hood River Valley and it was conspicuous to us for several reasons. The plant which has long pointed blue leaves was exceptionally disease resistant. It also was tolerant of quite a bit of shade as well. Hairy Manzanita from this part of the state is exceptionally cold tolerant. It will happily live on both sides of the Cascades. The long blue/gray foliage is perpendicular to large stems. The bark becomes deep mahogany and glossy with age. Best in unimproved native soils. To establish water it regularly once a week until you see good new growth then set it free. Drought adapted. To 5′ x 6′ a large shrub that grows quickly to its ultimate size. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Always good air circulation. The very early spring flowers are pure white and large on this cultivar. Russet berries that follow attract wildlife. Wonderful shrub, easier to grow than ‘Wolf Creek’.  Cold hardy well below 0ºF.  Oregon native plant.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Pieris japonica ‘Cavatine’

This is a very pretty and very useful plant that is tough as nails when established.  To just 3′ tall by as wide in 10 years.  In late winter the whole shrub is a garland of white urn shaped flowers on fine filaments. Bloom begins in February and remains effective for months. Medium green evergreen foliage with great year round appearance. Fits in small places  in full sun to quite a bit of shade. Regular water to establish then light water to eventually none on well established shrubs. Rich soil with high organice/wood content that is acidic. Very easy to grow in our climate and one of the best Pieris. Flowers buds are set the previous summer and are attractive for months until they open. New growth is tinted red. Very cold hardy enduring subfreezing wind and temperatures below 0ºF. Not bothered by deer- for the most part. Wonderful small hedge or specimen. Long lived.

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Artemisia douglasiana

Many learn this plant as Douglas Mugwort but its more official common name is Douglas Sagewort.  This aromatic vigorous perennial is common throughout western Oregon. It happily inhabits everywhere from ditches to the headlands at the beach. The plant has medicinal qualities that were used by native Americans and they also used the pungent smoke to ward off the spirits of the dead. To 3′ tall and spreading underground by rhizomes. This is a very vigorous plant when established, give it room and the respect it requires. In improved situations it can swamp other plants so best to leave your patch of sagewort to its own devices. Mix with other plants of similar vigor- Spiraea x pyramidata or Rosa nutkana. Give it at least 5′  x  5′ feet to roam. In summer plumes of off-white flowers produce a haven for pollinators. This member of the daisy family brings them from long distances. Very long lived deciduous perennial with long indented leaves that are dark green on top with an underside of pure silver. This makes this almost woody perennial very easy to spot in breezy conditions  It appreciates average soil and light water to establish.. If it flags in drought you may give it a deep drink in summer to refresh. Loved by a host of butterflies. Doesn’t need much love to perform. Oregon native plant.

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