Brilliant flower color cast on huge semi-double flowers are but one advantage to this handsome evergreen shrub. An upright pillar shaped habit makes it a great plant for tight spots or as a hedge or screen. To 8′ tall by 3′ wide in 8 years. The enormous 5″ wide opulent flowers area a clear and ringing coral. Showy from quite a distance and the entire shrub is clad in blooms from late January to March. Glossy pointed foliage is handsome year round. Somewhat formal dense habit lends it to small gardens, structural shrub. Full sun to quite  bit of shade in rich to average soil with regular summer water for the first several seasons. Benefits greatly from a layer of mulch after planting. Tosses its spent flowers which do not cling and discolor. Excellent shrub for Japanese themed gardens. Long, period of bloom.

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Camellia x williamsii ‘Little Lavender’

Interesting, hardy, and very bloomy Camellia that enchants us with anemone style flowers with a distinct lavender cast. Upright growing shrub to 8′ tall by just 3′ wide in 7 years. Glossy foliage looks good year round. Full sun to quite a bit of shade. Regular water to establish then deep and sporadic during winter.  Excellent skinny Camellia for tight quarters. Takes quite a bit of summer drought when established. Excellent tolerance of sub-freezing wind and this upright plant would make a showy hedge or screen. Little pruning needed. Flowers shatter cleanly, never clinging and discoloring- one of the best traits of any Camellia. The lavender hue of the flowers is most pronounced in full sun. The ‘Little’ part of the name refers to the size of the adorable flowers which appear en masse February-March.

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Western Buttercup is our own wonderful wildflower. This is the real thing and NOT the invasive Ranunculus ficaria. Traditionally it occupies open Oregon Oak woodlands and meadows including vernally wet meadows. Though it handles winter inundation it is also adapted to upland situations and in every biome it goes quickly summer dormant. Rosettes of pretty pinked leaves elongate in bloom to an airy spray of bright yellow flowers. Intimately, the petals have a glossy sheen. And growing up in the country it was traditional to put a picked flower under your chin and the reflected color yellow revealed that indeed you did like butter. Great cut flower that peaks on May Day and has made many a wild flower bouquet with purple Oregon Iris and purple Dodecatheon hendersonii- Shooting stars. Pictured here with Common Camas Camassia quamash at the Camassia reserve in West Linn, Oregon. Blooms from mid-April to early June. Vast meadows of western Oregon still harbor this sweet short lived perennial. Adapted to heavy clay soils- reseeds when happy. Suitable for mowed meadows as long as it has gone to seed by the time you mow. Wait until June.  Good competitor with invasives and absolutely integral to a Willamette Valley meadow. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant

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Lovely ubiquitous woodland flower that brings waves of glorious airy stars for weeks in late spring to mid summer. Occasionally pink the flowers most often are white. Handsome somewhat bold foliage provides a plant that is more than suited to competition on the forest floor. Often self sows and this is welcome. Plant containerized plants in spring and water faithfully through the first summer- but never boggy. Then it is yours. Let it romp among ferns, Hosta, Japanese Forest Grass for a sparkling NATIVE treat. Mix with other natives such as Vancouveria and deer fern. Very easy to grow. Blooms for a very long time and longer if we have a cool beginning to summer. AKA Candy flower. To 10″ x 10″ on average. Summer deciduous and emerges early in spring. Not bothered by pests. Forms spreading colonies in rich, humus enriched soil in part shade to shade. Locally native in the Portland city limits.  Oregon native plant. 

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Fuchsia ‘Suikkerbosse’

We took a break from Fuchsias for a few years, but its time to bring back some of the best. This compact, dense growing Fuchsia is a blooming workhorse. Sepals emerge green then take on terra cotta tints while the downward facing corolla is made of intense velvet plum petals. Cold hardy and it returns as a robust clump. To 2′ x 2′ forming a rounded outline. Excellent performance in full sun to part shade.  It becomes a little less compact in shade. This Dutch selection has survived all of the 16 years that we’ve grown it. An open north exposure is the best- open to the sky but no direct heat. Very good in containers. Rich soil and regular summer water. Do not cut back until new growth emerges in spring. Then remove frost damaged material. Wonderful Dutch selection. Beautiful plant.

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Achillea sibirica

A wonderful relatively new Achillea (Yarrow) from Siberia. It brings not only larger chalk pink flowers in bold umbels it is cold hardy to USDA Zone 2. This plant will never freeze out.  Forms expanding clumps with upright stems clothed in glossy long green leaves with small teeth. On 22″ stems umbels of flowers appear from May to August. After the first flush of flowers shear away and water and another round will commence. The long stems make great long lasting cut flowers too. Loved by a bazillion pollinators, hover flies, bees of all kinds swarm the flat landing pad. Full sun to very light shade in rich, soil that drains. Incorporate some oxygen in by double digging. Good companion plants are Agastaches and Penstemons as well as ornamental grasses. Completely deciduous in winter. Light consistent summer H20 to establish. Long lived perennial. Moderate deer resistance. Elegant perennial. Siberian Yarrow.

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Rhaphiolepis umbellata var. minor

Excitement doesn’t really well up with this genus. The reason we grow this plant is that it is healthy, drought adapted, and handsome all the time. And its a great scale and is slow growing. Dense evergreen shrub with wavy deep green foliage. New growth is conspicuously tinted red. In spring clusters of pure white flowers are pretty if not enough to stop a car. To 3′ x 3′ in 8 years. Yep. Slow growing and a great size for full hot sun to light shade and rich to average soil. Drought adapted when established it will also accept regular irrigation. Somewhat formal appearance and a great backdrop to other plants. A nice formal hedge plant or left to its own devices an informal hedge. Clusters of blue berries often follow the flowers and are added interest. NOT DEER RESISTANT. Rose family. Excellent performance in tough urban sites. Including unwatered parking strips. Grouped tougher it can form a low groudcover (3′ high). Regular water to establish. Dwarf japanese yedda hawthorne.

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A wonderful garden perennial and by far our favorite mum for fall. Much more informal and relaxed in habit and flower form it puts on a stellar show for months in autumn. Soft, copper pink single flowers radiate from a soft yellow center. A bushy perennial to 28″ x 28″ in full sun to light shade. Best in enriched soil for a good start in life. Regular summer water propels growth and blooming which begins in September and stretches nearly to Thanksgiving. Cut back hard the previous years remnants in early spring – as per your tidying routine. Very pretty cut flower. Underplant with Ivy leaved hardy Cyclamen for a soft but showy display. Long lived perennial gaining scale each year. Moderate deer resistance. Aromatic curly foliage is classic Chrysanthemum.

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Fuchsia ‘Zulu Prince’

Wonderful, large spreading hardy Fuchsia that falls in the aubergine clan. That means that at some point in its past the genes involved the deep purple black flowered Fuchsia excorticata. This lax growing plant sends curtains of slim flowers with a corolla of deep aubergine purple and sepals of merlot red. Established plants are about 30″ tall by 3′ wide for rich soil in light shade and regular summer moisture. This Fuchsia LOVES rich soil to perform at its peak. In full blooms its fairly spectacular. Blooms from June to frost. The pewter glinted leaves have deep wine red petioles. The whole plant is a good package. Freezes to the ground below about 25ºF. Mulch for the first winter and do not remove frost damaged growth until you see new growth emerge in spring. You’ll easily identify the material that has to go. Loved by hummingbirds. This cultivar lends itself to planting at the top of a shady wall where you can more easily view the curtains of rich flowers.

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The bodaciously named Chilean Glory Vine is a great low weight, long and strong blooming perennial vine in our climate. Filligree intricately divided leaves and petioles wind this deciduous vine  up to 10′ in a season. Most years it returns to the ground and resprouts in spring and that isn’t a bad thing. It gives you the opportunity to clear away the previous seasons chaff. If we have a mild enough winter it will retain some green but you may still cut it back in early spring. Waves of long stemmed tubular flowers are soft pink with a recurved lip tipped in yellow. Its an exquisite show that goes unabated from late May to September. We’re very attracted to this orchid like coloration of this form and we find it accommodating for mixing colors. It also comes in red, orange, yellow, and cream- in time we will offer those. Hummingbirds LOVE this vine and will immediately show up when flowering commences. Much easier than cleaning and refilling a feeder. Remove spent flowers and that will encourage more flowers. Blooms on new growth. As it grows it blooms. Fantastic on the wall of a chicken coop providing ample shade. Rich soil that drains and regular summer water. Mulch the base- protect the crown in the first winter.

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