This is a delightfully airy evergreen whose variegation definitely enhances the over all look.  A moderately fast growing shrub to 6′ x 3′ in 7  years. Very hardy to cold enduring temperatures near 0ºF with little issues. In spring spidery star shaped cream flowers appear in every branch end. Part shade to high overhead shade but it also does not burn in full sun in our climate, Just make sure that you water it regularly. Established shrubs get by with very little. Aromatic foliage is not palatable to animals and this is a very good bet where deer are a problem. Great shrub for brightening garden corners or lightening up dark shade. Rich to average soil. aka Chinese anise shrub. The flowers have a light odd scent. Not worth repeating and its only pungent up close. Seed pods that form become woody and star shaped,- aka Star Anise. Distinctive upright dense habit. Prune if needed AFTER flowring has ended.

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Catalina perfume is the common name for this lovely, tough evergreen currant from Southern California. The round evergreen leaves which do remind one of a Viburnum are resinous and spicily fragrant, especially on warm days. To 3′ tall and spreading about 6′ -this low shrub is best adapted to part shade and little to no summer water. It is incredibly drought adapted. In late winter to mid spring panicle of rose red flowers are light and airy- followed by green fruit. This is an ideal groundcover shrub under native Oaks.  It also makes an almost formal ground cover in landscapes . Found specifically on Santa Catalina in the Channel Islands off of southern CA. There it grows with other Channel island endemics. Tolerates full sun in our climate but its home is beneath the canopy. Water for the first year to establish then none in subsequent years. Not bothered by deer- unsure of rabbits. Prune it if needed after blooming. Blooms on wood from the previous year.  Excellent combined with Vancouveria chrysantha and Camas liechtlinii. for a culture and climate adapted grouping.  Grows very fast when happy.

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This has become a famous  favorite floribunda rose of gardeners all over. It does especially well in our climate and even endures and blooms in considerable shade. The very full  double flowers are 4.5″ across. They begin as buds that are colored distinctly brown, as the flower unfurls it changes to more of a parchment color then to lavender and finally silver white. It has a  moderate sweet fragrance and it re-blooms continuously and heavily until frost. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Disease resistant foliage on an upright vase shaped shrub to  3” x 3′ wide. Rapid and heavy re-bloom provides cut material all summer into autumn. This old fashioned faded flower color is brilliant with other more solidly colored double roses of pink or orange. The pointed buds are formed on long stems. Rich soil with regular summer water for the fastest re-bloom.  Prune hard AFTER PRESIDENTS DAY ( about FEB 20th). Prune off  everything with a diameter smaller than a pencil. Very easy forgiving rose that makes all others look fantastic. I would never be with out this charming, bloomy excellent rose. A floribunda rose that is prolific but whose flowers are much more like a  hybrid tea. Appreciates three applications of a handful of organic rose food + a handful of Alfalfa meal around the base per season. On its own roots. Wonderful multicolor morphing magic rose.

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We’re intent on expanding our offerings of our cold hardy native Hairy Manzanita. This form we found in the Hood River Valley and it was conspicuous to us for several reasons. The plant which has long pointed blue leaves was exceptionally disease resistant. It also was tolerant of quite a bit of shade as well. Hairy Manzanita from this part of the state is exceptionally cold tolerant. It will happily live on both sides of the Cascades. The long blue/gray foliage is perpendicular to large stems. The bark becomes deep mahogany and glossy with age. Best in unimproved native soils. To establish water it regularly once a week until you see good new growth then set it free. Drought adapted. To 5′ x 6′ a large shrub that grows quickly to its ultimate size. Full sun to quite a bit of high overhead shade. Always good air circulation. The very early spring flowers are pure white and large on this cultivar. Russet berries that follow attract wildlife. Wonderful shrub, easier to grow than ‘Wolf Creek’.  Cold hardy well below 0ºF.  Oregon native plant.

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Calycanthus occidentalis

Western Spice bush is native throughout semi shady and shady glens primarily in central and northern California with outliers in Oregon found north of Medford. A large deciduous shrub with a lush quality. The late leaves are medium glossy green and large. In summer double petalled madder red /brown flowers appear. The 2″ wide flowers have the distinct fragrance of a wine cask. Its most noticeable up close, but a large shrub in full bloom is a fruitful fragrant cloud. To 7′ x 7′ and adaptable to full sun to quite a bit of shade. Water to establish in its first year and then only occasional. This very tough drought adapted shrub should be used a lot more in our climate. Fall color is bright yellow but does not stop traffic. Tends to hit its ultimate height and then spreads laterally from there. In habitat its associates are Ceanothus, Aristolochia, Aesculus, Smilax. Very easy and long lived Oregon native shrub. Plant with Frangula, Ceanothus, etc in shrub borders or as an informal hedge. The more flowers you have the more dramatic the perfume. Seed heads that follow the flowers are large round semi woody urns and they are showy as well. Loved by hummingbirds and native insects. Moderately deer resistant  protect when young.   Oregon native plant.

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About 30 years ago I was introduced to this form of Asian Star Jasmine in Eugene. It was passed around as a clone that survived the disastrous freezes of 1989 and 1990. Its also sweetly fragrant where most varieties of Asian Star Jasmine are not or faint. This is an actual pleasant aroma, not as heady as the more common Star Jasmine Trachelospermum jasminoides,  but pleasantly sweet. The parchment colored flowers appear for an extended period from June to September. A huge flush of flowers in early summer and then sporadically for  months. Rich to average soil with regular summer water to establish and speed growth. Asian Star Jasmine waits to grow until truly warm weather is consistent. Regular water + warmth leads to a spreading ground cover or in wind free places it can self attach to surfaces and climb. To 12′ tall as a vine 18″ tall x 3′ as a ground cover. Full sun to considerable shade but not competition from tree roots. Very cold hardy form tolerating temperatures below 5ºF for short periods. Glossy undulate leaves are handsome year round. Wonderful, durable, ground cover.  Establish this plant well before its first winter and mulch for added protection. One of our favorite forms of Asian Star Jasmine. This performs just as consistently as other clones that have proved their durability. Not bothered by deer. Tolerates dry shade when very well established. Both as a ground cover and as a vine it clothes itself densely in foliage never any bare knees. Roots along the ground as it goes, great on slopes.

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Achillea millefolium ‘Willamette Gray’

Greg got seed of this distinctive form of Yarrow near Oregon City. Unlike most garden varieties that are derived from European stock which very much appreciates rich soil and regular water to perform and those forms are also not pungent. We wanted our locally native yarrow that is incredibly durable, has gray foliage that is pleasantly aromatic with broad white flowers. This is a much more climate adapted perennial. Its found throughout all of the state, and can be found anywhere from meadows to surprisingly deep woods. This is a very thrifty plant and once established it really doesn’t need supplemental summer water. Spreads to form finely divided low gray foliage. The flat umbels of pure white flowers are very large and this is a landing pad for all pollinators as well as butterflies. To 20″ tall in bloom. Excellent meadow component with clumping grasses, annuals, and bulbs. A great plant for hell strips and hot aspects too. Very easy and forgiving perennial. Blooms May-August. Mostly evergreen save for the very harshest winters. Not bothered by deer.  Oregon native plant.

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Himalayan Forget Me Not is a perennial for rich soil in woodlands and produces tall stems with clusters of cobalt blue flowers.  A rosette of large leaves forms colonies. In late spring it rises up and blooms. A great and showy pollinator perennial for part shade to high overhead shade. Easy to grow plant that loves rich soil with regular irrigation in summer. This verdant plant begins blooming in May and continues to July. It also makes a lovely long lasting cut flower. Disappears completely in winter- no presence. To 2′ tall in bloom and spreading to form multiple rosettes.Protect from deer. Mix with other part shade and rich soil loving perennials as Tricyrtis, Clinopodium, and Hosta. Visited by hummingbirds as well. Native to northern India and China. Nice perennial that is seldom seen.

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Heuchera micrantha

Crevice alum root is one of the most widespread of our native Heucheras. This rosette and colony forming perennial is almost always found on near seeps on wet slopes and cliff faces. The handsome green foliage is typically maple shaped and evergreen. In late spring to early summer clouds of very fine white flowers erupt on 2′ stems. Its a wonderful wispy effect. Rich to average soil with regular summer water. Established plants can handle much drier situations. The rosette colonies can be quite large. Lush and verdant evergreen for shady borders, hillsides, rock walls. Very easy and adaptable. Loved by pollinators and a great native pollinator perennial for part shade to shade. It will also accept full sun, but you have to pay closer attention to irrigation. Not bothered pests. In habitat it is often left alone by deer as it can grow on the most vertical cliffs. It makes a great but limited ground cover and the more plants you have the more flower spikes and the more showy and ethereal the affect. Combine with Struthiopteris spicant (Deer fern) and Oxalis oregana, Tiarella. A good container plant as well. A perennial for the north side of the house.  Oregon native plant

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Thalictrum occidentale

Smaller growing western meadow rue is a resident of deep moist woods as well as the margins of streams. Many divided leaves are delicate and flutter in the slightest breeze. Each indented leaflet is perched in the arrangement of an arrow. In mid to late spring wiry stems extend above the 1′ tall foliage another 10″ and displays flowers that are comprised of raspberry and brown downward pointed flowers. They make an evenly distributed display that is not so much showy as it is incredibly graceful. Loved by pollinators who swing by for the suspended pollen. Best in enriched soil with consistent irrigation in summer. It spreads to form large colonies and is exceptionally pretty crawling up a low bank or hill. Winter deciduous perennial. This species which is more of an upland species requires a little less water than the similar but taller Thalictrum fendleri but it still requires irrigation in summer, even when well established. Benefits greatly from a top dressing of mulch. Companion plants in habitat are Tellima grandiflora, Mitella, Heuchera and Delphinium . Prefers protection from mid day sun and will burn and/ or die in hot dry situations. ‘Forms expanding colonies. Very good woodland pollinator perennial with a wonderful texture. Moderately deer resistant. Oregon native plant.

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