Grevillea juniperina ‘Xera Ember’

Our improved selection of the Juniper Leaved Grevillea with darker orange to near red profuse flowers and a more compact habit. To 2′ x  4′ wide in time the prickly grass green foliage of this spreading evergreen shrub allows the vivid curly deeply colored flowers to shine. Blooms nearly year round with a peak in mid to late spring. Loved by hummingbirds. Completely drought adapted- never needs supplemental water. Poor to average soil that drains but has never been amended or fertilized. Awesome candidate for a hot hillside or a protected hot south facing wall. Spectacular in bloom. Requests neglect- you should oblige. Hardy to around 7ºF.  Full sun.  High deer resistance.

Xera Plants Introduction.

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Grevillea miqueliana var. moroka

Round leaf Grevillea is a great  hardy species from the highest elevations in the mountains of SE Australia. Handsome wavy round evergreen leaves frame showy pendant flower clusters from January to June. The sunset colored flowers feature orange/yellow/pink in various incarnations depending on the temperatures. Loved by over wintering Anna’s hummingbirds. Any reasonably well drained soil that has NOT been amended. Native soils are perfect, and tolerant of clay as well as sand.  Great on slopes. Fast, large growing to 8′ x 8′ in 6 years.  Sporadic flowers appear year round. Avoid fertilizers. One of the best climate adapted Grevilleas that we have grown. Grows very fast with little water. Full sun and a hot position. Listed as endangered/threatened in Australia where it occupies just a half dozen sites in the high mountains. Extra reason to grow this fabulous multidimensional shrub that is good looking year round and blooms for a long, long period. Light summer water is best as infrequent deep soaks when it is not hot. This shrub gains cold hardiness with establishment. Excellent sited where its roots can find protection and a cool respite. Large boulders, even pavers will help create this. A very rare Grevillea that is truly alpine in nature.

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Grevillea rivularis

Surprisingly cold hardy and wonderful Grevillea that is threatened in the wild. Crinkly, prickily, finely divided leaves (bipinnapartite) create a haze of a frame to 5′ x 6′ in 6 years. This “cage” of foliage is intermittently decorated with soft purple flowers from spring to early autumn. These are tipped with a bright green style that is released in bloom. The flowers are often described as toothbrush like. Full sun to very light shade in average soil. Light summer water speeds growth but that is the only reason it is necessary. A protected location. Hardy to about 10ºF- and suffering no damage in the wild winter of 2016/17. Protect from subfreezing wind. Easy to grow with neglect and good siting. Same hardiness to cold as ‘Canberra Gem’. Give it room as it will steadily and methodically increase before you know it. Moderate deer resistance. AKA Carrington Falls Grevillea. Avoid fertilizers. If it never bloomed this shrub is fantastic for texture alone. Not for cold gardens- best with some urban protection. Very limited quantities.

Photo credit: Loree Bohl

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Grevillea victorae ‘Murray Valley Queen’

A vibrant form of Royal Grevillea that is slightly less hardy to cold than the species and requires a protected spot. Why grow this variety? It blooms, and blooms, and blooms. Rusty orange buds decorate pendant clusters that open to fresh orange. This plant sets tons of buds in summer and then releases them to the public through all the months of winter. Slightly smaller leaves are dusted in brown indumentum when young. To 8′ x 8′ very fast in average, unamended soil where water does not linger. Best in urban gardens with extra heat. It does not abort as many, if any flower buds in the summer drought. Excellent performance at the Oregon coast. Rounded upright and spreading evergreen shrub that remains handsome year round. Prune if needed after the last flush of flowers in spring. Winter flowers are a beacon to Anna’s Hummingbirds. Native to Australia where it was discovered near the Capital of Canberra. Nice cut flower. Water to establish then taper to once a month in summer. In colder gardens locate under the canopy of tall trees or near a warm wall. Full sun to light shade.

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Grevillea victoriae ‘UBC Form’

Royal Grevillea is one of the most handsome shrubs that we can grow in our climate. Native to the highest elevation in Australia and then down to the middle elevations this species has been grown in our climate successfully for many decades. Large, long gray foliage is handsome year round and a great backdrop to the masses of orange pendulous flowers which are most prolific during winter. Loved by hummingbirds – Anna’s will stake out this shrub as one of the few sources of nectar during winter.  Full sun to light shade in average soil with light, consistent water to establish. Avoid baking hot locations as this plant forms and sets its flower buds in late spring and summer and they hold until the cool of autumn arrives to open. If this plant becomes too hot or stressed it can abort these flower buds diminishing the following seasons display. So, an average position away from reflected heat produces the best blooming. Very good performance in cold rural gardens, enduring 5ºF with no issue. Very large growing to 12′ x 12′ and sometimes larger with time. May be pruned hard in early spring to both limit the overall size but to increase density and blooming wood. Great performance at the Oregon coast and in Puget Sound as well as the coast range and Cascade foothills.  In the Willamette Valley the hybrids ‘Neil Bell’, ‘Octopinky’, ‘Poorinda Queen’ and the species G. Juniperina do not abort their flower buds in the hottest weather- and seem to perform more satisfactorily.  Moderately deer resistant.  Long lived. This form is from the University of British Columbia.

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Grevillea x ‘Canberra Gem’

One of the easiest Grevilleas to grow in our gardens this free flowering hybrid requires a protected location but is surprisingly hardy when well sited. To 4′ x 6′ wide in 5 years, the needle like foliage is bright green and fairly crowded along the stems. Bloom begins in March and extends to July. A small amount of flowers appear year round.-  clusters of spidery deep vivid magenta flowers. Very showy. Loved by hummers. Full sun and average to poor well drained soils. Great at the top of a hillside or next to the south wall of a house. No summer water, or compost necessary.  You may water it weekly to establish and you can trail off as the plant grows. Native unimproved soils are what it loves. Cold hardy to the low teens. It has recovered from lower and we’ve seen established shrubs in protected places all over western Oregon. Fantastic performance at the Oregon Coast where it should become a staple landscape shrub. High deer resistance- and that includes Elk on the coast. Takes well to pruning after the first flush of bloom has ended. Hybrid between G. rosmarinifolia and G. juniperina. Evergreen. See video clip below.

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Grevillea x ‘Citrus Sparklepie’

Grevilleas are interesting in that almost all species will cross and you can end up with some really weird shit. In this instance I selected  this mounding evergreen shrub for the vividness of its orange flowers and superior cold hardiness from about 50 others. This cross between G. victorae and G. juniperina has thicker leaves than most cultivars (and seedlings) and that translates directly to improved cold hardiness and they end in a sharp tip. This variety has weathered 10ºF so far and could be hardier.  Larger, vivid orange flowers with a style stained melon red that quickly matches the orange of the perianth. (Pouch like petals that reflex when open). To 3′ tall x 8′ wide in 5 years. Full sun to very light shade in average to poor soil. Water weekly after planting and then as growth increases limit it to once a month- a deep soak. Blooms almost continually with a crescendo in late winter/early spring. Loved by hummingbirds, European honeybees, and native hover flies. Easy to grow. Mulch after planting. Its important that Grevilleas become well established by their first winter- this immediately increases cold hardiness. Once established its fairly care free except for occasional pruning. Established shrubs can go through summer without any supplemental water. Fun to grow shrub. Excellent at the Oregon coast, tolerates sandy substrates with additional water. Not bothered by deer. Elk? I have no idea- they will at least step on it so protect. Grevilleas all require good air circulation. Avoid plants that flop or lay on them- not only will it block the sun  it can even encourage rot. Site your Grevilleas where they are open and the wind can blow them dry.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Grevillea x ‘Constance’

This is an important hybrid that is among the best known in the United States of G. victorae x G. juniperina. A wiry rounded shrub with thin twisted green leaves that are rolled at the margins. Throughout the year a constant procession of orange/red flowers decks the whole frame. Loved by hummingbirds. To 7′ x 7′ in 7 years in average, well drained soil in full sun with little water once established. Not the hardiest Grevillea and has been superseded by cold hardier and superior varieties- such as ‘Neil Bell’. It is, however, an excellent evergreen shrub for the milder coastal regions. In Portland it is relegated to the warmest urban areas in protected locations. Easy fast shrub that you should protect from subfreezing wind inland. There are enormous specimens on the northern Oregon coast that adore that climate and it is naturally adapted to sandy soils. High deer resistance. Loved by hummingbirds. Prune to contain and maintain a compact habit. Hardy to about 13ºF- or slightly less hardy than ‘Canberra Gem’. Very floriferous.

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Grevillea x ‘Foxy Red’

We selected this seedling long ago for its vigor, it was chosen from a batch of 50 as one of the best and it is. ‘Foxy Red’ is a mounding, low growing shrub that spreads. To 3′ tall x 8′ wide it produces a nearly year round parade of tomato red flowers. The  elongated superior foliage is olive green on the upper surface and gray below and comes to sharp point. Fast growing in full sun to light shade. Average unimproved soils are ideal, dig a large hole and soften the soil on the outer edges.  Water faithfully, once a week until good new growth commences then water less- once every two weeks/month depending on aridity. Nice looking winter blooming shrub that is ideal planted above rock walls where it can cascade down. Loved by hummingbirds, especially wintering Anna’s who see an out of season nectar source as gold. Mulch after planting- coarse bark, chips, gravel…. Established plants take summer drought without supplemental irrigation. Should be deer resistant. At some point we’ll test it for their consumption. Really nice looking shrub both in foliage and bright flower. May be pruned at any time of the year. Avoid strong subfreezing east wind. Protected site- south or west facing.

Xera Plants Introduction

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Grevillea x ‘Leanne’

Handsome evergreen shrub that displays masses of gold/old gold spidery flowers nearly year round- peaking in late winter into spring. Clean paddle shaped leaves are olive green on top and silver gray on the underside- a great combination with the flower color.  Dense growing to 4′ x 6′ in full sun and poor to average well drained soil. Little summer water when established- extraordinarily drought tolerant.  Loved by hummingbirds. One of the easiest to grow and fairly spectacular in full winter bloom. Excellent everblooming shrub for slopes, dry hillsides, low water areas.  Avoid compost, nutrients. Tip prune if growth is too fast or rank and endangers the plant from rocking.  ‘Leanne’ thrives on our own unimproved native soils. Full sun to very light shade and neglect. Excellent cold hardiness. Hybrid between G. victorae and G. juniperina. Avoid summer water which can leave it susceptible to phytophthera. It can tolerate ANY amount of extreme drought with no problem. Nice mounding habit for hot hell strips. Mixes well with Arctostaphylos, other drought adapted shrubs. Gains cold hardiness with age- establishment.  Excellent garden shrub. At one point this and many other hybrids were known for the ranch, Poorinda where they were discovered/bred. That first moniker has been dropped in all of the varieties (Save for x ‘Poorinda Queen’- which, well. Cuz.) So, this is just Grevillea x ‘Leanne’ now. Why they made this change I do not know. Crazy Australians.

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