Hairy Honeysuckle or wild pink honeysuckle is a common vine in the western part of our state. Ranging rom S. British Columbia to California. This sprawling and twining plant is most associated with the cover under white oak woodlands. This vine can crawl to impressive heights into trees. As a child near Eugene this grew extensively on our property. It would climb pole sized trees and I would strip the winding canes off the trees and use them as a trellis for annual vines. The strong wood lasted 10 years or more. It derives its name from the conspicuous hairs on the leaves. At terminal ends of the branches soft pink curly flowers appear in cymes from June to September. These are followed by brilliant red berries that are food for birds. It has no fragrance. Excellent plant for stabilizing banks and hillsides where its incredible tenacity and drought tolerance is an advantage. Never a tidy plant this vine can be sent up a trellis or large tree. Water to establish then set it free. This honeysuckle can be afflicted with aphids early in the season but I’ve never seen it actually inhibit the plant. Just make sure not to look to closely at the plant in May-June. Evergreen to semi-evergreen with round leaves that surrounding the stem nearest the ends just before the flowers appear. Best in wild areas.- for some it can lack the sophistication of our other native honeysuckle Lonicera ciliosa. and us not as immediately beautiful. In habitat it consorts with Oregon White Oak (Quercus garryana) Poison Oak (Toxicodendron diversifolia) and Creeping snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus). Often found clambering up steep rocky slopes in dry woods. Oregon native plant.

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Lonicera x standishii

Winter Honeysuckle is an often forgotten shrub. Its large and in our climate it doesn’t usually lose all of its leaves until mid-winter. But that is the time when this big girl shines. Small but powerfully fragrant off white honeysuckle flowers stud all of the stems. And remain sweet for weeks. To 9′ x 9′ as a free standing shrub. Flowers are born on wood from the previous year. Prune after flowering in spring. May be trained as a vine with diligence. The flower stems are also easy to force into bloom indoors. A great shrub for hedgerows and even hedges. In the garden it often does duty in the back 40- where it will thrive in anything from full sun to almost dense shade and little extra water once established. Loved by over wintering Anna’s hummingbirds. Don’t forget winter flowers. Underplant with winter flowering Cyclamen coum and Crocus tommasinianus.  Very tough. Not bothered by disease or bugs. Consistent water to establish then VERY drought adapted.

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Lonicera ciliosa

PNW Orange Honeysuckle is one of our most showy native vines. Our region is sparse on native vines so this pretty plant is welcome. In late spring to summer clusters of brilliant orange tubular flowers decorate the branch tips. Loved by hummingbirds as well as other birds which is obvious, its also important for all native pollinators. The flowers change to brilliant red fruit which is consumed  by wildlife and seldom lingers.  Deciduous mid green foliage is verdant all through the season. As with the vast majority of Honeysuckle vines this plant nearly always goes leafless at the base. Expect this and plan for it. Strongly twining plant to 12′ tall and almost as wide. Provide strong support. Light consistent summer water to establish then very little necessary once established. (Also accepts regular summer H20). Excellent vine for country fences, decorating mailboxes etc. Protect from deer, otherwise it is pest and disease resistant- occasional mildew in the autumn is virtually harmless – great news for a honeysuckle. Blooms on wood from the previous season, prune if needed after flowering. This vine can be very hard to find. We grow it from seed and quantities are limited.  Oregon native plant

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Lonicera ‘Lemon Beauty’

Dramatic yellow foliage with an interior of deep green on the small evenly spaced evergreen leaves of this low spreading shrub. To 3′ x 4′ and forming something of a mound. Spreads low at first- gains height with age. Rich soil with light summer water in full sun to part shade. Very drought tolerant when established. Lights up borders, is easily clipped- without mangling the small foliage. Flowers are tiny and cream colored often followed by translucent purple berries. Sometimes reverts to all green – just cut those reversions cleanly out. Very easy to grow plant for foundation plantings, tough sites, hedges. There is some confusion over the exact species…if you look it up half say L. nitida and half say L. pileata. I’m going to have to go with L. ??. Shrubby honeysuckle.

 

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Lonicera nitida ‘Twiggy’

British selection that is a golden dwarf form of L.n. ‘Baggesen’s Gold’. Low compact dense  growing ever-gold shrub that is well scaled for small gardens. To 1′ tall and in a long time 1/1/2′ wide. Full sun to part shade in rich to average well drained soil. Leaf color is most vivid in full sun and hardiness to cold improves there too. We have never seen flowers on this cultivar of box leaf honeysuckle. Easy to grow. In very cold winters the foliage takes on maroon tints. Low hedges, massed as a ground cover.

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Lonicera nitida ‘Baggesens Gold’

Useful fine textured golden evergreen shrub that brightens the landscape. This form of box leaf honeysuckle is popular as a sheared hedge but we think it makes a better focal point. The leaves can burn in the hottest locations and conversely turn a bit more green in the shade. Takes any amount of pruning. We have yet to notice flowers or berries on this cultivar. To 4′ x 4′ very quickly. Very drought tolerant when established. Cold hardy to 0ºF when established. May be pruned into any conceivable shape. The tiny leaves escape damage by shearing and the whole plant becomes immensely dense. Prune virtually any time of the year.  Supposedly tiny yellow flowers are not very conspicuous but can transform into translucent purple berries if pollinated. Rare to see. Grows quickly.

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Lonicera x americana

A hybrid between two european species has yielded one of the best climbing honeysuckles we can grow. Less prone to pests and disease this prolific blooming vine produces huge trusses of pink/yellow/cream highly fragrant flowers from late spring to autumn. A non-twining semi-evergreen vine that requires the support of something in which the canes can interweave and be supported. Often bare at the base- plan for this. To 12′ tall and as wide. Massive initial display of flowers in late spring and then sporadically until Sept. Full sun to light shade and regular summer water to increase vigor, spur re-bloom. The fragrance is not sweet and cloying rather a complex blend of cloves, cologne and petunia. It carries for quite a distance. A good sized specimen will perfume the entire block.

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