One of my favorite separate strains of CA poppy. ‘Purple’ gleam is a tiny bit of an over statement. More accurate its pink w/ purple overtones and a lighter center. Blooms from April August in a wave of big flowers that tossles over compact plants with filigree blue foliage. Full sun and average  to even poor soil. Often potted Eschscholzia will perennialize and live for a year or two in the ground. Otherwise its an annual and will succumb when the whole plant blooms itself out. To 10″ x 12″ forming a spreading plant. Remove spent flowers to continue the show. Many plants will take a break over summer and then resume blooming w/ cooler autumn rains. Great pollinator plant. Containers, dry areas, borders. Reseeds reliably w/ about 80% true to parent type. Wonderful with Clarkia unguiculata ‘White’ and Collinsia grandiflora. High deer resistance. Leave open disturbed soil for it to reseed. Light summer H20.  Oregon native plant

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Gilia achilleafolia

Yarrow Gilly Flower as the 49ers named this sweet little annual California wildflower. Frilly green foliage gives rise to 10″ stems supporting violet to sky blue flowers. Blooms May-July in our climate. Very easy to naturalize in open disturbed sites. A great reblooming pollinator wild flower. Makes sweet little bouquets as well. Full sun and lose un compacted soil- turn the soil to incorporate oxygen before planting. Light summer water keeps things going. Or it will finish with drought setting seed for the next years performance. A reliable and useful re-seeding plant for open, rocky places, where no sane plant can find purchase. Often comes up in the ‘Alba’ white form which is fantastic and makes the blue form seem more intense. Great little cut flower. Very light H20 extends the show.

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Gilia capitata ‘Willamette Valley Form’

Globe Gilia or Bluefields is a widespread wildflower from British Columbia to Baja. To 30″ tall and forming a substantial plant very quickly. From April to July and sometimes longer  these striking sky blue flowers appear and rise on tall stems displaying the orbs of flowers.  If you apply light consistent water and remove the spent flowers they can re-bloom. Otherwise, they persist until hot weather and then set seed and die.  Studies at  OSU on native pollinators ranked this #1 as their source for pollen/nectar. That alone gives you reason to include this re-seeding plant in your garden. Rich, to average disturbed sites are ideal. It often grows and self sows in the disturbed slopes of road cuts, dry hillsides. In the garden it LOVES good conditions and will be much larger, bloom longer, with flowers of a darker hue of blue. A great wildflower for the garden that makes a sweet cut flower. Loved by pollinators of all kinds. Wild areas, hell strips, dry gardens. Easy to naturalize if you contain the competition from other plants. Locally native in the Portland city limits. New plants germinate in autumn and overwinter happily.  Oregon native plant.

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Gilia capitata ssp pacifica

We once grew this form of Gilia capitata as our own local species. WRONG. We compared it to the southern Oregon Coastal variety ssp. Pacifica. That form is shorter but blooms are a distinctly darker blue. Everything as for the species Reseeds faithfully in OPEN disturbed sites with little competition from invasive weeds/turf grasses. This thick, stout variety makes a wonderful cut flower. It also has the same attractive properties that make it one of the best native pollinator plants. To 18″ tall and forming patches that reliably re-sows each year.  See above care. WE love both forms of this Gilly Flower made famous by early European settlers. They’ve spread this wild flower around the globe where it has become naturalized in parts of New England into E. Canada. Not a bad weed but an example of something from here with adaptation to another climate.  Oregon native plant.

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Gilia tricolor

Bird’s Eye Gilia is a showy and delicate appearing but tough hardy annual from the central valley of California into the Coast Ranges as well as Sierra Nevada foothills. To 6″ tall each stalk bears multiple gorgeous purple to white flowers with a distinct dark eye. Give your pollinators a treat this diminutive plant will bloom for 4-6 weeks in late spring to summer in our climate. Give it open disturbed soil without competition form invasive grasses to complete its life cycle, where it will reseed with abandon. Lovely little west coast native annual for sunny, wild sites. Good in containers for a brief but brilliant wildflower display. Excellent in parking strips where it will love the reflected heat. Light consistent water until its time to go quietly to sleep. Good drainage helps.

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Helianthus bolanderi

Serpentine Sunflower or Bolander’s Sunflower. Who doesn’t like sunflowers? I don’t know about you but they make me smile. There are several native sunflowers but this one is the cream of the crop. Native to extreme S. Oregon and extreme N. California this wonderful plant shines on the most difficult soils. Known as Serpentine Sunflower – Serpentine soil is a special substrate full of heavy metals- zinc, iron, copper. It prevents many plants from growing. These conditions are widespread in Southern Oregon into California, where this soil reaches the surface it produces zones of very specialized plants- they LOVE the harsh conditions and poor nutrients and tolerate the toxic elements. It can be quite a transition in plant communities from normal soil to serpentine- in just a few steps. This lovely annual sunflower though is EASY to grow in average to enriched soil- It handles just about everything so long as there is full sun. To 3′ tall and forming multiple spikes of 3″ electric yellow flowers with a contrasting black center. Amazing cut flower and if you remove flowers it will encourage more . Nice long stems for summer bouquets- they appear floppy but are in fact wiry and stiff- perfect for arranging.  And a pollinator madhouse. Blooms June- October- one of our longest blooming native annuals. Forms a multibranched plant with shining flowers sticking out in all directions.  Light consistent irrigation in summer. Makes a fantastic hedge of flowers. Re-seeds in open disturbed sites. Moderate deer resistance. Easy to grow. Oregon native plant.

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Ipomea purpurea ‘Grandpa Ott’s’

Can’t imagine summer without morning glories. This old time favorite we love for the intensity of the color as well as length of bloom. This rapidly twining vine gets going after truly warm weather arrives. Funnel shaped glories unfurl early in the morning and are resplendent until afternoon. Longer on cooler/ cloudier days. To 8′ in a single season for average to enriched soil in FULL SUN with regular summer H20. Easy to send scrambling a teutier, fence, lattice. Very fun to grow. Annual vine that is not so rambunctious as to smother even low perennials, to large shrubs. Remember that the flowers always point towards the strongest sun- which is south.

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Layia platyglossa

Tidy Tips a SW american desert daisy that puts on massive displays in famous high rainfall years. In our climate this hardy annual continues blooming for months as our cool summer nights seem to trick into an eternal spring. To 10″ tall forming a spreading plant in full sun and rich to average, well drained soil. Good drainage assists it in setting seed and that seed over wintering for germination the following spring. Remove spent flowers to spur more. Light consistent summer water. Otherwise let it go to seed. Nice cut flower. Loved by butterflies. Easy to save seed and toss out in spring in open sites after all threat of frost has passed.

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Leptosiphon ‘Star Dust’

BABY STARS!  Cute hardy annual that is actually a west coast native. Also known as Stardust this little plant produces adorable stars in pink, orange, yellow, and white. All together a tapestry of color on just 3″ tall plants. Reseeds prolifically in open disturbed sites. Just one potted plant will yield hundreds of seedlings for the following year. Blooms May- July then dies, goes to seed, is no longer there. Great bulb cover. Little to no summer water for self sown seedlings. Primarily composed of Leptosiphon parviflorus which is native to central California. Our own locally native Leptosiphon bicolor is similar and In the wild the flowers are primarily pink with a yellow eye- occasionally other colors. Adorable. Baby stars.  Leave cleared space in your garden near these plants to allow these plants room to re-sow. Competition from other plants is the main reason that this plant loses its grip in the garden. Simply scratch a bare area near each patch and do not remove the spent plants until they are properly straw and dropping their fine seed. Delightful lining paths. Creates the most honest looking wildflower vignettes possible in our gardens. Full sun.

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Limnanthes alba

Willamette Valley white Meadowfoam is such an unassuming plant with an incredible tough streak. Finely divided grass green leaves are completely obscured by the copious cup shaped white flowers. Opulent bloom begins in April and extends to early June. Forms connecting mounds that knit together into one sheet of ivory petals. Native to the central and southern Willamette Valley. It can be seen occasionally on road cuts and the gravel on street margins. But planted en masse it is spectacular. Excellent plant for tough, compacted, clay soils. To 4″ tall and each plant is about 1’wide. Leave spent dried stems where you want the next years display to be.  Germination in autumn precedes most cold season weeds and forms an effective cover crop. Though prolific its well behaved enough to live between shrubs and even perennials. Excellent mixed with Baby Blue Eyes and Yellow and white Limnanthes douglasii.  Water containerized plants at installation then none necessary. Self sown seedlings are MUCH more drought adapted and can germinate on soil as hard as concrete. Moderate deer resistance. Beautiful native wildflower. Oregon native plant.

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