Western Wallflower is a very widespread biennial or short lived perennial. It occurs from Alaska to nearly Mexico and throughout the west coast. The first season is spent as a rosette of thin undulating leaves. In the second year it extends, forms branches and achieves multiple flower spikes. The species is best described as yellow/orange with some slight variation in these seed grown plants. In Oregon its is widespread but it has all but disappeared from some biomes, the Willamette Valley for instance, a victim of non native invasives. To 22″ tall in bloom. You  may get a third season but it is much less of a show.Best to let this plant set seed and die ensuring a new generation of plants. Leave open disturbed sites for re-sowing.  A gravel mulch will encourage this as well and it appreciates average to enriched soil and light consistent water to establish. The following year it can rely on only what fall from the  sky. Blooms appear for several weeks in late spring. Loved by pollinators with a special draw to butterflies. Common associates in the wild are Dodecatheon hendersonii,  Mitella , Ranunculus occidentalis, Nemophila. Oregon native plant

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Eschscholzia caespitosa

Golden poppy is native to the inland valleys of southwest Oregon. This charming annual is much more delicate in habit and color than its more common bolder cousin Eschscholzia californica the ubiquitous California poppy. This little jewel demands a hot sunny location in soil that is average, and not improved. It will self sow locally but nothing like its cousin. This demure little poppy blooms from late April to mid-June. Full sun is vital. Mix this charmer with other similarly adapted annuals. Collinsia grandiflora, Plectritis congesta, Gilia capitata. Very deer and rabbit resistant. Water potted plants to establish, resown babies in the future can get by on natural rainfall alone. Oregon native plant

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Eschscholzia californica ‘Cream’

A very favorite annual or short lived perennial. This excellent California poppy sports ivory to cream large flowers for an extended period in summer. Fine blue foliage is wonderful with the softly colored flowers. Blooms from April to August if you give it a little water- but never soggy. Full sun to the very lightest shade in average to enriched, well drained soil. Un irrigated plants will bloom for a shorter period and set seed. The seed comes true about 90% of the time. Cull orange or other colors that don’t please you. It may become a short lived perennial if treated well. New plants germinate en masse with the first autumn rains. Don’t be afraid to thin your patch a bit then. Rough areas, along gravel paths. Easy to grow. Containers, Hellstrips. Etc. High deer resistance. Oregon native plant.

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Eschscholzia californica 'Jelly Beans'

Eschscholzia californica ‘Jelly Beans’

Spectacular mix of double flowered California Poppy in shades of pink, yellow, apricot, rose, red, orange, and yellow- and more colors than that. Easy to grow plants that can even be perennial if happily sited and cared for. Otherwise an incredibly showy annual that also makes a great cutflower- cut in bud and they will last several days. Sophisticated selection of our own native poppy and they will most likely reseed in open disturbed sites. Blooms May-August and sometimes longer. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Leave the final round of blooms to set seed for the following season. To 1′ x 1′ with beautiful lacy glaucous foliage. Rough areas in full sun with light summer H20. Highly deer resistant.  Oregon native plant.

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Eschscholzia californica ‘Pretty in Pink’

True pink California poppy. Seed from this exceptional pink flowered selection comes true about 95% of the time. Deep rose pink semi-double flowers appear in late spring and continue sporadically until mid summer. A happy plant can become a short lived perennial but the majority will behave as bloomy annuals. Full sun and rich to average soil with good tilth (crumbly texture). It can even thrive in compacted soils. To 10″ x 10″ forming a compact plant with lacy blue foliage. The strident rose pink flowers are showy from a distance. Leave the last round of flowers to seed for the next several seasons. Excellent wildflower display in rough areas w/ low water. Water plants to establish then taper off. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. Wonderful flower color. Mix with Eschscholzia c. ‘Alba’ the white form. Deer resistant and drought adapted native plant. Oregon native plant. 

Xera Plants Introduction

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Eschscholzia californica 'Purple Gleam'

Eschscholzia californica ‘Purple Gleam’

One of my favorite separate strains of CA poppy. ‘Purple’ gleam is a tiny bit of an over statement. More accurate its pink w/ purple overtones and a lighter center. Blooms from April August in a wave of big flowers that tossles over compact plants with filigree blue foliage. Full sun and average  to even poor soil. Often potted Eschscholzia will perennialize and live for a year or two in the ground. Otherwise its an annual and will succumb when the whole plant blooms itself out. To 10″ x 12″ forming a spreading plant. Remove spent flowers to continue the show. Many plants will take a break over summer and then resume blooming w/ cooler autumn rains. Great pollinator plant. Containers, dry areas, borders. Reseeds reliably w/ about 80% true to parent type. Wonderful with Clarkia unguiculata ‘White’ and Collinsia grandiflora. High deer resistance. Leave open disturbed soil for it to reseed. Light summer H20.  Oregon native plant

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Eschscholzia californica 'Willamette Valley Form'

Eschscholzia californica ‘Willamette Valley Form’

Plants don’t really stay in the same place, They move according to climate and soils and with the help of humans. This famous poppy carpets meadows and glens and rocky hillsides in brilliant orange from SW Washington through Western Oregon into California to Baja  but is happily grown throughout the globe. Sunny orange flowers with an edge of lighter yellow in our local form appear from mid spring to late summer. This form was identified in 1846 at the former town of Tonquin. Tonquin is about 500 yards from our nursery and this poppy is everywhere. Blue fine foliage on spreading plants to 14″ tall and up to twice that width. Full sun in any soil where water does not collect. Reseeds itself prolifically and can become your own introduced weed. Seedlings are easy to spot and dispatch if unwanted. Nice cut flower if you pick it in bud. Loved by pollinators. Easy to grow native annual/ sometimes a perennial. Water to establish plants then none necessary. Completely deer and rabbit proof. Oregon native plant.

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Felicia aethiopica ‘Tight and Tidy’

Billions of blue daisies with a brilliant yellow center adorn profuse long stems.  Bloom occurs unabated May-October. Remove spent flowers to encourage more. A more compact form of this shrubby tender perennial to 16″ x 36″ in a single season. Excellent performance in container plantings. This is a real work horse of a daisy whose airy sprays of daisies mix harmoniously with a number of schemes. In the ground this tender perennial can over winter in a mild year (above 20ºF). Excellent pollinator plant and a real hit in my garden with butterflies. Full sun to very light shade in rich to average soil. Light, consistent summer water. If it over winters cut it back hard after all threat of frost has past. Containerized plants can be moved to an unheated garage to over winter. Brilliant blue daisies are exciting. This plant will perform as a hardy perennial at the Oregon coast.

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Gilia achilleafolia

Yarrow Gilly Flower as the 49ers named this sweet little annual California wildflower. Frilly green foliage gives rise to 10″ stems supporting violet to sky blue flowers. Blooms May-July in our climate. Very easy to naturalize in open disturbed sites. A great reblooming pollinator wild flower. Makes sweet little bouquets as well. Full sun and loose un-compacted soil- turn the soil to incorporate oxygen before planting. Light summer water keeps things going. Or it will finish with drought setting seed for the next years performance. A reliable and useful re-seeding plant for open, rocky places, where no sane plant can find purchase. Often comes up in the ‘Alba’ white form which is fantastic and makes the blue form seem more intense. Great little cut flower. Very light H20 extends the show.

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Gilia capitata ‘Willamette Valley Form’

Globe Gilia or Bluefields is a widespread annual wildflower from British Columbia to Baja. To 30″ tall and forming a substantial plant very quickly. From April to July and sometimes longer  these striking sky blue flowers appear and rise on tall stems displaying the orbs of flowers.  If you apply light consistent water and remove the spent flowers they can re-bloom. Otherwise, they persist until hot weather and then set seed and die.  Studies at  OSU on native pollinators ranked this #1 as their source for pollen/nectar. That alone gives you reason to include this re-seeding plant in your garden. Rich, to average disturbed sites are ideal. It often grows and self sows in the disturbed slopes of road cuts, dry hillsides. In the garden it LOVES good conditions and will be much larger, bloom longer, with flowers of a darker hue of blue. A great wildflower for the garden that makes a sweet cut flower. Loved by pollinators of all kinds. Wild areas, hell strips, dry gardens. Easy to naturalize if you contain the competition from other plants. Locally native in the Portland city limits. New plants germinate in autumn and overwinter happily.  Oregon native plant.

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